The Poem of June ──
Interview with Hoshino Hidehiko

Ongaku to Hito
July 2020

text by Kanemitsu Hirofumi
photographs by Sasahara Kiyoaki_L MANAGEMENT

 

20 Years of Poems¹

To think that the annual June solo interviews with Hoshino Hidehiko would see its 20th year. The phrase “persistence pays off” must have been referring to this interview series. For such a memorable milestone, plans like visiting his favourite Southern island, releasing a photobook, or throwing a fancy party were in the making, but due to the emergency declaration and self-quarantine measures put in place in light of COVID-19, we found ourselves in a mood which leaves us unable to do interviews or anything with any pizzazz.

This segment ended up being handled the same way with a short photoshoot in the garden by Tama River, followed by a remote interview held on Zoom. We mainly talked about the band and their album recording which got put on hold, and about his usual laid-back everyday life, but we also hope that the days when we can relax and talk normally about these regular things will return soon. And next year, we’ll really go to a Southern island for this interview!

 

 

The album is hard to describe in one word (lol). It’s simple but there are songs that have new wave or techno influences too

―― What do you think? Your first Zoom interview.

Hoshino (H): I heard a lot about it. My soccer friends had a remote drinking party recently but I was late and didn’t get to join them (lol).

―― Hahahahahaha.

H: I want to join them next time, though.

―― I’ll be waiting to hear about it from you. Well, it’s the 20th year of this Poem of June interview and I was thinking of setting it on a Southern island but……

H: There you go again (lol).

―― No, no, no, I’m serious. We’re going to be a year late but let’s make it happen next year. We’ll publish Simply Life 2 as well (lol).

H: If only things would settle down, right?

―― Of course.

H: How’s Ongaku to Hito coping?

―― We only come to the office when we absolutely have to, but we’ve basically switched to working remotely. For shoots, they’re now mostly screenshots or selfies too, or like today; a quick photoshoot with a small group of people on short notice.

H: Yeah, even TV programs are either being recorded remotely or broadcasting reruns. Everyone’s struggling.

―― BUCK-TICK’s recording got suspended too, right?

H: Yeah. Recording quickly came to a halt the moment the state of emergency was declared in Tokyo. That was around the start of April, so I’ve been staying home for more than a month since then. I haven’t really left the house except to buy food.

―― What do you do at home?

H: Nothing special…… But in such a situation, don’t you get the urge to rearrange things at home?

―― Totally! I’ve been spending my days decluttering and making orders on Amazon.

H: Likewise (lol).

―― What kind of rearranging are you doing? I can see from the screen, in your background, that you’re in your home studio.

H: I didn’t really make any changes here, but I made other parts of the house, like the veranda more comfortable.

―― What did you do?

H: I DIY-ed, stuck tiles on the deck. And I bought a hammock.

―― A hammock for the veranda!

H: It turned out rather nicely (lol). I was also lacking in exercise, so I did yoga with videos on YouTube.

―― It’s the same in my house (lol).

H: If this goes on for another month, you’d definitely run out of things to do.

―― Since you’re a musician, have you seized this chance to write heaps of songs?

H: Somehow, I can’t get into the mood for that (lol).

―― Please get into it (lol). But when you look at Instagram, doesn’t it seem like Imai’s composing a lot?

H: I heard he is.

―― Do you check his Instagram account?

H: Soーmetimes (lol). A little bird told me that he collaborated with a different Hoshino-san² and I was like who, who?

―― You’re bandmates and yet someone else had to tell you!

H: Hahahahaha. That’s because we don’t contact each other all that frequently.  But recently, since, you know, we’re in these circumstances, I asked them if we should hold a meeting on Zoom.

―― An invitation from Hoshino-san?

H: Yeah. But no one replied (lol).

―― Hahahahahaha.

H: I think I spoke about it with Yuta for a bit. Like, “What do you think?” But after that, we didn’t have any particular reason to hold meetings anyway; we’re just waiting to get back into recording.

―― But although it was suspended, I heard that you guys were actually making good progress.

H: Recording was going unusually smoothly (lol). All the songs were pretty much done and there were just a few songs left to record for the guitar, so it feels like if we had just a few more days [it would’ve been completed]. Though, I don’t know whether Imai-san might still be composing more.

―― Was it because the song compositions were simple that things went so well?

H: That’s right. The songs themselves were simple with lots of guitar parts and riffs too. Generally speaking, these songs aren’t the type that are jam packed with sounds. It’s more like playing guitar phrases rather than layering things on. That’s why the work itself is relatively simple.

―― How does Hoshino-san envision this album to turn out?

H: It’s hard to describe it in one word (lol). It’s simple, with less sounds, but there are songs that have new wave influences. There’s even a sort of techno song included, and stripped down songs like Datenshi. I think we’ve made this album from a different angle than the last.

―― What about Hoshino-san’s songs?

H: I’ve composed 3 songs and I think the recording’s all done already. But I still don’t know how it’s going to turn out. Because we don’t know when we can get back to work anyway, right? Besides, I don’t expect that we’ll be able to gather in the studio in a big group to work  on things like we always had. We’d probably have to cut down the number of people and make sure it doesn’t get too crowded.

I hope that our future will be one where this time next year, we’ll be able to ask, “Shall we visit a Southern island?” and laugh about it

―― Makes you wonder what it’ll be like.

H: It’s hard to say. Because this isn’t the kind of problem that can be solved with us making some sort of effort and doing our best to work it out, right? The only way around it is to keep up with [safety] measures on a personal level. Like, washing your hands for 20 seconds, doing mouth rinses, bringing your own disinfectant alcohol solution when you go shopping.

―― But it’s tough to keep doing this too, isn’t it?

H: Isn’t it way unexpected that a pandemic of this scale would happen in our lifetime? Like, who would’ve thought that the kind of event that would show up in a history textbook would happen now. Now we can’t even do the things we used to take for granted. We can’t even go out and have a meal with our friends. We can’t have a face-to-face conversation. And especially in the case of livehouses…… I never realised how lucky we were to have had all these things we took for granted. Really makes you wonder what live concerts will be like in future too.

―― Because you can’t perform shows the same way anymore if we’re going to go with what they’re now calling the ‘new normal’, right?

H: What are they referring to?

―― Keeping at least a distance of 1 metre between you and another person, needing to be far enough from each other to allow singing or cheering or just holding it online, avoidance of crowding, close contact and closed spaces, etcetera.

H: Makes it difficult, doesn’t it? Thinking about it like that it seems like we can’t even start [putting on shows]……

―― Because this problem basically won’t go away unless we can get immunised or vaccines get distributed, right?

H: Isn’t that why we’re all in agony over this? At the same time, we can’t even go out for drinks, can’t even go exercising. And when that happens, we end up doing nothing but clicking the buy button on Amazon (lol). Since the hammock is working out well, I’m thinking about getting a high-pressure cleaner.

―― What a family man³!

H: Hahahahahahahaha. I’m just thinking that it’ll probably be necessary for us to live comfortably. Like, I want to do the things I normally won’t be able to do.

―― Speaking of which, how’s your health? You got hospitalised last year and lost quite a lot of weight but after that……

H: I started wondering about a bunch of things about myself so after our tour concluded the last year-end, I thought I should probably get another check-up at the start of this year so I went to the hospital, and everything’s good so.

―― That’s good then. We’ve both come to an age when we need to take care of our health.

H: Because once you pass the age of 50, it’s just a battle against yourself, isn’t it?

―― A battle against yourself!

H: Everyone feels the same, right? It’s something you come to understand once you’re over 50 (lol).

―― If, next year, I say, “Let’s go to a Southern island for our interview in June,” where would you like to go?

H: Shonan⁴ is good enough (lol).

―― What.

H: I mean, I hope that our future will be one where this time next year, we’ll be able to mention that and laugh about it.

―― But the only thing we can do is to believe that’s how things will turn out and keep going. Although, I think I might continue working from home a little longer though.

H: We’ll have to stay home a bit more. Ah, come to think of it. I had a photoshoot at Tama River for a bit just now, right?

―― Yes.

H: I just remembered; we also did it at Tama River 20 years ago, right?

―― Ah! Now I remember (lol).

H: Though, at the time, I was also wondering, “Why an interview with me now, at this timing?” (Lol)

―― And you’ve been wondering for 20 years (lol).

H: I didn’t think it would go on for so long.

―― I think the most significant thing to me back then was probably that you poured your heart out to me and said that you were happy to be in this band. Because those weren’t the kind of words you’d hear from band members⁵ in those days.

H: I suppose that’s true.

―― I hope that the band will continue being active for the next 5, 10, 15 years and that this Poem of June will keep going, and that our magazine will endure.

H: Let’s keep our fingers crossed (lol).

 

 

 

 

Notes:

¹ Fuubutsushi (風物詩) is defined as “something which is reminiscent of a particular season” or “a poem about natural scenery or a particular season”.

² With Hoshino Gen. Imai actually posted thrice.
1st: https://www.instagram.com/p/B_Ftx6-JMtK/
2nd: https://www.instagram.com/p/B_IcNrApePI/
3rd: https://www.instagram.com/p/B_K3wX_J-Aw/

³ In Japanese, the phrase is straight up マイホームパパ (my home papa).

⁴ Shonan (湘南) is located southwest Kanagawa prefecture which is approx 1 hour away from central Tokyo. Shonan area is basically a seaside region of Sagami Bay from Enoshima to Oiso.

⁵ Not sure if he was talking specifically about BUCK-TICK or bands in general.

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Scans: Patowinds on Tumblr

The Poem of June ──
Interview with Hoshino Hidehiko

Ongaku to Hito
July 2001

Text = Kanemitsu Hirofumi
Photography = Okada Takayuki
Styling = Yagi Tomoharu

 

So, Hide-san
How’s BUCK-TICK recently?

Hoshino Hidehiko is BUCK-TICK’s guitarist. If you’re a fan, you’d definitely know that this friendly and easy-going personality of his is his honest self, but this person really hasn’t changed one bit. In a good way. There are times when he seems inconspicuous because of the exceedingly spontaneous guitarist named Imai Hisashi, but it is his guitar and melodies that give the band its vibrant allure. While Sakurai and Imai are busy with SCHWEIN, it appears that preparations for BUCK-TICK’s activities were also ongoing and there’s even a new Hoshino song included in the songs that are currently being recorded. There’s much to look forward to in the near future with BUCK-TICK. So how about it, Hide-sa~n?

 

 

—— Readers have been asking, ‘What’s going on in the realm of BUCK-TICK’s activities?’ (lol). So here we are, having this interview.

Hide (H): Yeah, well. But recent days have been just like what you’re seeing in the photos. Personally, I’ve been spending my time quite leisurely everyday. I’d routinely wake up around midday, watch daytime dramas (lol).

—— Fuhaha, daytime dramas.

H: The ones that started recently aren’t that great though, are they…… Well, but I am writing songs (lol). And recording just happens to start today too. We’re working on it bit by bit in the free time that we have.

—— On Hoshino-san’s song?

H: That’s right. Today we’re going to start recording something that I wrote myself. And there’s also Imai-kun’s song. We’ve just begun so I can’t really go into detail yet.

—— You’re being unusually assertive (lol).

H: Not at all (lol). But, well, since they’re quite busy with SCHWEIN, you know? So I have to show that I’m working hard here too (lol).

—— So about SCHWEIN, what do you think?

H: In short, they’ve taken an industrial-like approach [to music]…… I guess you could say that much was as expected since [the music] felt like the kind of sound that those two, Raymond and Sascha would make.

—— Is Hoshino-san personally on the fence……?

H: It’s not like that. I’m interested in it, though. Recently, when it comes to things surrounding guitar sounds…… I’m not talking about an intensive use of programming. More like, adding rough guitar noises [into the music] and…… that sort of direction. That’s what I’m liking recently. This year, I don’t expect that we’d be holding many BUCK-TICK concerts anyway, so I don’t think I’d out in public much. And that’s why I figured it’d be important.

—— Do you think that these extra-curricular activities would bring something significant to BUCK-TICK?

H: I wonder…… Well, there might just be something? I’m sure there’s something that will be brought back [to BUCK-TICK]. There won’t be anything coming from me though (lol), to the band.

—— An easy-going statement, as usual (lol).

H: As I’ve often been told…… (lol). But if there were to be changes, it’s better if it happened anyway. Besides, I’m pretty sure we’d fall into some sort of convention when we’re making music in the same environment with the same people. That aspect…… is a plus to me.

—— The conventions within the band itself?

H: ………… I think they definitely exist, right? Conventions. Whether they’re good or bad. And that’s why I want that to change, to some sort of transference…… In the end, it’s bad if we don’t make progress, right? That’s something I felt keenly 2 years ago.

—— Like, ah, turns out I feel like that (lol).

H: Yes…… My heart’s gone dull (lol). It felt to me like we weren’t getting anywhere 2 years ago, so I’ve been feeling uninspired since then. Most of the time I just feel like, “I want to perform live,” and things like that. I need to be in front of people (lol)…… Because then I have to appear in public. Otherwise I’d look a mess (lol). I don’t really think about myself, you see.

—— Hahahaha. Since it’s just everyday life (lol).

H: Yeah (lol)…… Well, nothing can be done even if I jump the gun myself anyway (lol).

—— It feels like you’re a band of 5 who think as 5 different people (lol).

H: Yeah. I think we’re quite independent of each other anyway (lol).

—— But hasn’t the band been progressing in good form since the release of ONE LIFE,ONE DEATH?

H: Yeah…… I think it’s good. Well, in terms of level of satisfaction though, it comes with each composition. Like the reactions I get, or when someone tells me its good…… Those are pluses to me. At least, that’s what I feel.

—— Are you concerned about the kind of reactions you’d get?

H: Mm……………… I think I am…… Well, I act as if I don’t mind but I do (lol).

—— So you’re just acting (lol).

H: No, I do care, usually even. Although, I’m not bothered. Not really (lol).

—— Wahahahahahaha!

H: I care on the inside (lol).

—— Whether it’s the lyrics or the person, you haven’t changed one bit (lol).

H: Yeah. Because I don’t think the bottom line has changed at all. It’s the same for me and even Acchan’s still the same since the first time we met. You’d get that sense too when you look at the band. Though, I guess we’re changing bit by tiny bit (lol). In the end……I think the parts that don’t change, won’t change no matter how many years we do this. I guess most fundamental aspects [of ourselves] can never be changed by people, or anyone for that matter. And we just stay like this; it’s as if we don’t interfere with one another.

—— Even though you say that, the 5 of you are often together, aren’t you?

H: I actually think we can stay together precisely because we don’t butt into each other’s affairs. We do go too far, though (lol). How do I say this…… Well, I guess it’s like, we don’t touch the things that we shouldn’t…… I don’t really give it that much thought, though (lol).

I’m happy being here. And I’m sure that it’ll stay like this going forward. All the way

—— Do you think you think you’ve achieved the ideal you have in mind?

H: Right. It’s also been 15 years since the band was formed, hasn’t it? About what we’d be like now, back then…… we didn’t think about it at all. For example, we played our first gig at Shinjuku’s JAM or something, but we only thought as far as, “Man, I hope we get to play at LOFT next,” (lol) you know? We didn’t think about where we’d be now and somehow…… it doesn’t feel like we’ve grown up, barely. Hey, am I an adult (lol).

—— Hahaha, please don’t pose that question to me.

H: Mm…… I don’t quite feel it, you know. It feels like I’ve gone through a time warp (lol).

—— From 15 years ago? (Lol)

H: Or rather…… The idea of what makes an adult back then…… is completely different, isn’t it? Although, its true that if you look at an old photo, say, from 5 years ago and compare, we’d look completely different and you’d probably even think things like, “Ah, I’ve gotten more wrinkles,” (lol) but it’s not as if we live our lives checking these things all the time, and besides, I’ve still got the same band mates around me anyway. And on top of that, we do the same things, have the same relationships, play the same roles when we drink, laugh about the same things; everything’s the same (lol). There’s something weird about this, isn’t there?

—— Like an island that’s cut off from the outside world (lol).

H: The Galápagos Islands (lol).

—— Have you ever thought something like, “I didn’t expect this would go on so long.”?

H: I did think that it would be nice if we could keep on going…… It happens that just spoke about this with Yuta just now. Like, “We’ve already known each other for 20 years, huh.” Something that was just said out of nowhere. It was shocking and at the same time it really just sank in (lol). I thought, “20 years, right. That’s amazing……”, but there we had Anii still drumming like he always had since the beginning, and Yuta was being Yuta as usual (lol). It got me wondering, “Where are these 20 years?”

—— Right?

H: It’s so weird~.

—— Seems like it happened to someone else instead (lol).

H: No, no, no. I think I would feel that I’ll probably be playing in a band for a long time to come because this is such a cosy place for me to be. Besides, depending on the person, it’s probably not good to spoil them, I think…… all while being spoiled, hahaha.

—— But I find myself wondering what is it that ties you together in such circumstances? Considering that you don’t butt into each other’s affairs.

H: Hm. What indeed…… There’s no particular “something” though…… And, well, when it comes to the music, it’s obviously because I like the sounds that everyone makes. Maybe that’s what.

—— Don’t you want to get a feel of those sounds from somewhere else?

H: I somehow don’t really…… I don’t want to do it unless its BUCK-TICK, you know? Once, I was invited to take part in the recording of ISSAY-san’s solo work but…… I just couldn’t wait to go home (wry smile).

—— Fuhahahahaha.

H: But it’s not as if I don’t like recording work itself. My surroundings, like the presence of staff members who I don’t know at all, not seeing the faces who have always been there…… Being there, I felt very uncomfortable (lol).

—— Is it the vibe? (Lol)

H: Mm… I’m not so good at it………… Like, I’m not good at dealing with people I’m meeting for the first time (lol)…… I don’t think I was like that when I was a child, though.

—— So, if you were with BUCK-TICK, you could chat casually, and you’d be at ease.

H: That’s one, for sure. I’m happy, and besides, I’m enjoying myself (lol).

—— You’re definitely the person least likely to be described as distressed or stoic (lol).

H: I don’t really want to work too hard (lol).

—— Whether it’s because of that or not, there’s a reason why Hoshino-san’s melodies and sounds feel so gentle.

H: You know, people say that, but I don’t really know why either (lol). But there was a period of time when the, melodies and whatnot…… people would say that they’re very much my style, and I really hated it when they put it like that, and I was like, “I’m gonna show you a different side instead!” So there was this period when I forced myself to go in a direction that was nothing like my style.

—— Deliberately?

H: Yeah. But then suddenly, it sort of hit me like, “Ah, the best is to go my typical way.” So I made that my brand……or something like that (lol).

—— Is your position in BUCK-TICK a pretty comfortable one?

H: I get very…… Rather, I have a lot of freedom [to be myself] (lol). That’s what I like about it. But if the only songwriter was Imai-kun then maybe…… I might start to feel that even being in a band isn’t much fun because I guess the things I’m required to do would feel prearranged (lol).

—— Ah, so you want to have the space to assert yourself a little (lol).

H: No, not that. The fact that most of my songs are BUCK-TICK’s…… I doubt that’s the case (lol).

—— Ahaha. But it’s true that the band isn’t stuck going in one direction because of Hoshino-san’s presence, right?

H: Yeah. Because I’m making music as it comes to me; I just go with the flow. Without forcing things. Without thinking about unnecessary things. That allows me to make music spontaneously…… Without considerations like what’s trending now, none of that…… Besides, even without all those, [the music] still holds up anyway, and I actually feel that in BUCK-TICK, we can’t [make music] if we’re sensitive to those kinds of things. I definitely don’t mean that we turn our backs on it though.

—— Right.

H: I just feel that we don’t have to think too much about it. As long as we can evolve slowly while swimming in the same tank…… In the end, we’re all in this together. I hope that our bottom line will always stay the same, and…… even if we have our own personal concerns, this is where we can forget about it all, right (lol). That’s why, at this point in time, I don’t know what the future holds, but I’m happy being here. And I’m sure that it’ll stay like this going forward. All the way.

 

 

 

 

Notes:

※ This interview was published online by Ongaku to Hito on 16 June 2020 as part of a series of interviews they began posting during the lockdown in Japan during that year. This particular interview was chosen partly to celebrate the 20th iteration of Hide’s series of annual interviews which was going to be published in the July 2020 issue of the magazine.

In the online post, there was an additional introductory paragraph written for this piece, also written by Kanemitsu Hirofumi:

June 16th is the birthday of BUCK-TICK’s guitarist, Hoshino Hidehiko. Here at Ongaku to Hito, we conduct an exclusive interview with him every June, and this year will mark the 20th iteration! In this latest July (2020) issue of Ongaku to Hito, Hide-san talks about his laid-back everyday life. But this character of his that has remained unchanged throughout all this time is one of his biggest charms. So here is a republication of the interview from 20 years ago. The Poem of June [Roku Gatsu no Fuubutsushi¹] began with an honest sharing of his feelings towards the band. Let’s celebrate his 54th birthday with a comparison of the new interview and the interview from back then which were both shot at Tama River!

¹ This particular interview series with Hide is an annual special called “6月の風物詩”. Fuubutsushi (風物詩) is defined as “something which is reminiscent of a particular season” or “a poem about natural scenery or a particular season”.

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Source: Ongaku to Hito

BUCK-TICK — Uta/Kimi e Review

Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll
April 1995

Text by Onojima Dai

 

BUCK-TICK will be releasing their new single Uta/Kimi e on March 24. What is this sound that broke their long silence like?

BUCK-TICK announced their new single, Uta/Kimi e. How many years has it been since we had a new record from them? Apart from Yuta’s serialised column in this publication, we’re barely heard any news of BUCK-TICK’s movements during their break. It’s also been a really long while since I’ve met or even spoken to the band members too, so I could listen [to this single] with a fresh mind.

Uta was composed by Imai Hisashi, and Kimi e, by Hoshino Hidehiko. The lyrics of both songs were written by Sakurai Atsushi.

Whichever song you listen to, the first thing you’d notice is the introduction of distortion-filled heavy metal-like rock guitars. And they weren’t effectively used in specific parts of the songs. Instead, they shaped the character of the songs by reverberating throughout pretty much the whole track. Based on the general impressions I’ve got, I’m sure that even though Imai and Hoshino’s guitars can be noisy and make strange sounds you wouldn’t hear anywhere else, I don’t think they have ever pushed such an orthodox and undoubtedly rock-styled distortion sound to the forefront before.

As a result, the subtle delicateness and exquisite shades that had always been present in BUCK-TICK’s music until now has disappeared and turned into a strong, heavy rock tune that slams into you.

On the other hand, the world of Sakurai Atsushi’s lyrics and his vocals largely maintains the image that he’s created so far. Of falling endlessly while desperately reaching your hands out in search of light in a world where hope and despair are in conflict. This in itself is an approach towards a perfected universe.

But, a problem lies in the sound balance.

I’ve listened to it close to 10 times since I received the tape, but somehow, I just couldn’t shake this feeling that something felt off. Before, I’d always feel like I’d made a new discovery or like my heart had suddenly been pierced with a delicate touch whenever I listened to a new BUCK-TICK song, but this time, there was none of that.

The singing and the playing are disparate. Or, well, maybe making them disparate is just one honest way of expressing it, but rather than going in the direction of each part complementing and playing up the other, I ended up getting the impression that these two parts were killing off each other’s positive aspects.

And the most uncomfortable part of it all was the beat. I can’t feel any groove at all. The rhythm is precise but there’s no nuance or timing that is strong enough to lead the whole song along so no matter how eager they are to try to distort the guitars, it doesn’t have the slightest bit of rock ‘n’ roll intensity. Why on earth did Anii drum such a flat rhythm when he’s supposed to be a fan of the role model of rock ‘n’ roll dynamism and nuance John Bonham (Led Zeppelin).

But I thought of something when I heard this longitudinal rhythm. Maybe the composer had in mind industrial sounds representative of Ministry or Nine Inch Nails. Rather then subtle nuances and sensibilities, the industrial machine beats that seem to barge through thick and heavy are like a sort of hardcore punk with a spasmic beat, kind of like a pulse without the groove and undulations. That, in its own way, is powerful and cool but I don’t think that this beat that BUCK-TICK brought this time is anything that meticulous. Somehow, everything is half-baked. In short, I suppose it doesn’t match their nature.

But, well, I guess it’s fine too. More than anything, the thing that disappointed me the most when I listened to this single was that I could barely sense any BUCK-TICK-ness or anything that is specifically unique to BUCK-TICK and only BUCK-TICK. The one most conventionally BUCK-TICK-like thing in this whole single was probably, Sakurai’s singing. As a vocalist, he is by no means perfect one. While delicate, Sakurai’s voice, which is neither robust nor that of a heavy rock vocalist’s, keeps getting muscled out by the loud and forceful background music. His subtle nuances and thoughtful wordings gets blasted away, leaving only a brutal impression like that of a rough, grainy photograph.

And their sound. They probably have a few creative ideas of their own, but unfortunately, barely any of their original ideas or that ingenuity can be detected in the BUCK-TICK sound in this single. Whichever song you look at, it just seems to me that they are taking overused formulae from Western rock music of 4 to 5 years ago that have been reused for years, only to recycle it again now.

I rated Shapeless, an album of BUCK-TICK’s songs remixed by Western techno artists highly. Of course, the remixing is the work of the remixers and have nothing to do with BUCK-TICK themselves. But even though they had the opportunity to see what different possibilities their music has with the help of these top Western artists, they instead chose to go against the times and step backwards, going industrial. This is just too much of a waste. I’m not saying that BUCK-TICK should make techno music. I don’t think it’s too much to ask of them to apply the spirit and new direction shown in techno, the music of this era. At the very least, isn’t this a more correct solution for them as compared to forcing themselves down the heavy rocker route if they considered their own nature as musicians? Well, having said all that, “No, I only did it ‘cause I wanted to,” is what I can already see Imai saying though……

RR97 Coverage Report:
Sakurai Atsushi/BUCK-TICK

ROCK AND READ Blog
07 September 2021

The next issue of “ROCK AND READ 097” (sale on 24 September) is a special issue of BUCK-TICK who are releasing their new single, Go-Go B-T TRAIN on 22 September.

BUCK-TICK will finally be dropping new music one year after their last album ABRACADABRA was released in the middle of the pandemic.

In addition to an interview with Sakurai Atsushi, who wrote the lyrics for all the songs on the single including the new versions, Uta Ver. 2021 (唄 Ver.2021) and JUST ONE MORE KISS Ver. 2021, in this issue, there will also be an interview with Imai Hisashi who composed the title track Go-Go B-T TRAIN, and Hoshino Hidehiko who composed the new B-side, Koi (恋).

There will also be an article discussing the original JUST ONE MORE KISS and Uta, the era they were created in and their impact, plus a report on the conceptual live stream concert Misemono-goya ga Kurete Kara~SHOW AFTER DARK~ (魅世物小屋が暮れてから~SHOW AFTER DARK~) which was broadcast back on July 17.

So, the first part of this 52-page Go-Go B-T Special is a long interview with Sakurai Atsushi, who graces the cover of this issue.

He goes into detail about all the songs recorded on Go-Go B-T TRAIN and talks about what happened in the year following the release of ABRACADABRA. Sakurai’s words in this interview on what “flowers” mean to him is quite a touching moment too, so do look forward to that.

Charging ahead fueled by love, the BT Train driven by BUCK-TICK who chants the “Spell of Love” is on its way!

 

 

 

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Scans: ROCK AND READ BLOG

 

 

Somewhere Nowhere 1995 Live Report

Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll
July 1995

Photography by Inoue Seiichi
Text by Oshibe Keiko

 

At long last, “Six/Niɴe” begins!!
Breaking report!! 2 Days’ Concert at Budokan

The curtains have finally been raised on BUCK-TICK’s tour, Somewhere Nowhere 1995 with their 2 days of opening concerts at Budokan on May 16th and 17th. Their sound becomes ever more experimental with each new release. But even as their staging becomes less appealing to the general masses, the band’s collective power remains unparalleled. Now, we’ll tell you all about what the concert was like, ahead of everyone else in this ultra breaking report that made our printing company cry.

 

 

Their continual search for sonic innovation while maintaining a pop presence is even more poignant

BUCK-TICK’s long-awaited album, Six/Niɴe was released on May 15th. They kicked off their tour, “Somewhere Nowhere 1995” with 2 days of opening concerts at Budokan on May 16th and 17th.

This tour will go on for a period of approximately 2 months, ending with their final 2 days at Osaka Koseinenkin Hall¹ on August 2nd. As this magazine will go on sale when the tour is still in its first leg, I will do my best to refrain from spoiling the setlist in this report.

Two days before the start of the tour, the band played at Shinjuku LIQUIDROOM².

Compared to an auditorium, the ambience of a live house makes it easier to bring out a sense of euphoria and a particular communal sense of unity. And I frankly think that more often than not, the closer you are [to the performers], the more tangibly thoughts and feelings can be conveyed.

However, after watching these two shows, I realised that in the case of BUCK-TICK, it was easier for them to get their message across when there’s a certain amount of distance between them and the audience.

Because their show isn’t the type where the energy gets amplified by getting the audience involved. Instead, I feel that it draws you in with a deliberately constructed overall mood on top of an increasingly unique ambience in terms of sound. Coming too close will contrarily make it difficult for them to convey this ambience, as if in a bid to create some kind of distance.

For example, in a live house, Sakurai’s lines in Somewhere Nowhere or even his screams sound like a script from an avant-garde play with a rawness that left me at a loss as to how to react, but in Budokan, it came across with a poignant effect instead.

If musicians innovated without losing their inquisitive spirit with each new work they put out, just like BUCK-TICK, then oftentimes, the range of audiences they can reach narrows. That is to say in other words, the factors of the greatest common denominator, or their mass appeal, diminishes.

But BUCK-TICK’s audience have always been flexible in accepting whatever they release. I think that is in part a result of giving typically-passive audiences a sense of autonomy through the process of them evolving their sound all while compellingly drawing in listeners. Because of that, even songs like Uta can be classified as pop as long as it is being performed by BUCK-TICK.

Personally, it’s BUCK-TICK’s band power of randomly shifting values that intrigues me.

This new album appears to be an attempt to rebuild using new elements after demolishing a certain level of mastery they had attained in their last. It is exceptionally proper of them as artists to disregard the pursuit of any sort of “likeness” or anything like that amidst the pre-established harmony. This stance along with their consistent ability to draw in an audience makes for a simply gratifying tale.

But how does the audience view this present album? While there is an increased sense of “better conveyed from a distance” in their pursuit of innovation, I also got the feeling that there was diminished connectedness with the audience. Watching the arena from the second floor, I could see that although the audience understood the band’s stance, they yearned for moments when they could somehow connect with the men on stage somewhere.

Like the tune hummed after the Uta’s break, or Sakurai’s short emcee. In those moments when it felt like there was some way to connect with the stage, the audience felt as if they were groping around trying to find it.

The main set comprised only songs from the new album, arranged such that it would bring the singular flow to a close at the end.

Caught up in such a flow, I think the audience felt that it was easiest to eke out those “moments” during the song from Kurutta Taiyou, which the band played in the encore. But that connection was severed all too soon the moment the song ended and the auditorium light up. While there might be those who simply enjoy this set up or who get some sort of masochistic pleasure from this, I’m sure there are also those who were left feeling like there’s unfinished business.

However, this concert was held the day following the release of the album which also means that not everyone was familiar with the music yet.

Taking that into consideration, at this point in time, it is still a mystery as to whether the uncertainty exhibited by the audience was because of that, or due to the confusion around the band’s direction in the new album.

It will be interesting to see what the mood in the various tour venues will be like as [the audience] soaks in the album.

At the same time, it is as Yagami Toll said during his interview for the new album; the band’s principal stance is to disregard their audience and do whatever they want.

How “pop” of an existence will this piquantly self-seeking band who hurtles headlong into going their own way continue to be for their audience from now on? Will their sound evolve as they figure out how to keep up their centripetal force so strong that it transforms their worth?  Looking at the way they’re going recently, I personally feel that there’s a lot we can expect from them in this respect.

 

 

 

Notes:

¹ Now known as Orix Theater.

² First opened in July 1994 before shutting in January 2004. Later that year in July, they moved to Shibuya and reopened.

 

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Scans: Endless Dei (@DeiEndless on Twitter)

 

Related articles:

[Jun 1995] Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll: Six/Niɴe Feature — Double-Edged BUCK-TICK

[Jul 1995]  Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll: Outpouring from the heart — Part 2 of Sakurai Atsushi’s interview in the Six/Niɴe Feature

 

Double-Edged BUCK-TICK

An Intense Hunger For Life

Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll
June 1995

photography Hitoshi Iwakiri (岩切等)
hair & makeup Takayuki Tanizaki (谷崎隆幸)
styling Tomoharu Yagi (八木智晴)

 

It’s been 2 years since their last album, darker than darkness.
Following the release of their 2 singles, Uta and Kodou, BUCK-TICK’s new album,
Six/Niɴe will arrive on May 15.
That special withdrawn decadence which was brought to fruition in darker~
has been eclipsed by the intense hunger for life portrayed in this album.
But what does it all mean?
From demise to rebirth…… The key to this are the north and south poles of a magnet or in other words,
hidden in the album title which implies the concept of opposites.
In this issue, we’ll close in on them with a double feature of personal interviews with the members of the band
and the direct confrontation between Onojima and Imai over the single Uta!!

 

 

 

 

Individual Interviews

_______________________

Atsushi Sakurai

Interview by: Onojima Dai

This interview was held right after the conversation with Imai that comes later.
Here, there are quite a lot of differences in the nuances of what they say. And this is the first time that Sakurai so blatantly shared his opinions about his fellow band members. Although it is of course that these opinions are, ultimately, based on the fact that the members have a close relationship with each other, like family.

I do sense the mismatch between the singing and the music, and I get what you mean by that.
But the main reason behind this is really because that guy was too tardy with the songwriting.

―― What did you have in mind when you were in the process of producing this album?

Sakurai (S): It was definitely…… to stop using words that I didn’t know. Even with the applications of words and phrases, I decided that I’d stop using things I don’t know. It probably sounds weird, but I guess it feels as if doing that reveals my own stupidity to a certain extent, whether in the music or the lyrics. Things like vocabulary, it shows everyone your ability, like how you would with your musical instruments and your technique. So, it’s already become difficult for me to do that, things like trying to make myself seem like a bigger deal than I really am.

―― Why did you need to make yourself look like a big deal?

S: (Long silence) I don’t know. I don’t even know if I could make that last either.

―― Maybe you didn’t want to be looked down upon?

S: That might be the reason. But we can’t bluff, can we? Humans. Especially when it comes to this sort of…… Well, maybe that’s not true for everyone. …… Because, me, I’m no actor. Neither am I a poet, right? I’m just a member of a band, anyway.

―― Do you have some sort of complex around being a band member?

S: (Silence) No, no. I don’t.

―― For you, do you feel that you don’t want to fit into the role of the band’s vocalist or that you can’t?

S: Mmn…… (Long silence) …… I don’t know (lol). Do you think so?

―― Don’t ask me.

S: Hahahah. Well, even I don’t know myself.

―― Don’t you think that people in general all get the feeling that their present state of self isn’t their true self, or that “This isn’t who I am.”?

S: I think that might’ve gradually gone away. This might sound contradictory but I’m usually thinking, “Ah~ So this is the kind of person I am.”

―― How did you come to think like that?

S: It’s self-defense, isn’t it? It’s easier like this. To me, at least. It’s like, if I’m at ease, I can deal with anything that comes my way, I suppose.

―― Looking at the lyrics in this album, there are a lot of times when expressions like “I want proof of my life” seem to come up out of nowhere. Does this have some sort of relation to this change that youspoke of?

S: Yeah. Yeah…… But poetry, it’s nothing more than theatrics after all. If I didn’t feel that I had to write, then I wouldn’t. Ah, I might’ve written poetry but I don’t know about song lyrics.

―― Is poetry different from song lyrics?

S: I think it’s different. To me.

―― Is putting music to words itself something that feels unnatural to you?

S: There’s some part of turning my words into lyrics that feels quite unnatural. Because I have to write according to Imai’s or Hide’s music. Even for a phrase like “そうですか [I see] (so-u-de-su-ka)]”, if Imai gives me tan-tan-tan, three beats, it would turn into “そ・う・か [I see] (so-u-ka)”. I noticed that this time, because of that, I had to, as much as possible, do my best to not deviate. From what I’ve written and what I had in mind.

―― So, this album, I thought that the balance between the music and the singing was exceptionally off. That was particularly so in Uta. It’s as if the singing is losing out to the music, or they just don’t match up or something. Though, Imai-kun made it sound as if that was, to some extent, intentional.

S: I can’t, I’m not capable of production like that, of myself. That guy…… Calling him “that guy” sounds terrible. He’s capable of doing that kind of production, you see. I don’t think about those things or go that far. Although, I do sense that mismatch and I do get what you mean by that……

―― Hmmm…… I don’t know if I should say it……

S: Please say anything you want.

―― I got the feeling that there wasn’t enough communication between Sakurai-kun and Imai-kun prior to writing a song and all that, though…… Or am I wrong?

S: No, there was barely anything lacking. That more or less happened when we got to the later half of our work, but there wasn’t anything like that in beginning. Then, after it starts to take some shape, we’d decide that we like this, we don’t like this, things like that…… There’s no planning on the whole, yeah. There are positives to that but there are also things that just don’t work. I don’t think we ever said it was a good thing, though.

―― Even compared to before?

S: No, but we’ve never done that before either…… Because the songs that we wrote earlier on… Like Uta… I guess it’s just Uta. There’s nothing with that song. I didn’t want to say anything, and I was frustrated too…… Because, you see, both him and I, we hate giving in. We also hate making others bend over for us.

―― But weren’t you in perfect agreement for your previous albums and releases?

S: Were we?

―― (Lol) Well, that’s just what it sounded like to me based on what I heard. That both of your goals were aligned and the band came together to move towards the one same direction. Not that it’s in monotony, you know.

S: Mm…………

―― Though, I suppose it just so happened that the result was unanimous.

S:  Yeah. I guess you can say that. Which is why this time, I really couldn’t…… grasp it. Because even after we’ve started recording, Imai hadn’t written the songs yet. Then it was a rush, recording the rhythm section, I didn’t even know anything about the other band members’ work too, yeah. It’s too late to blame anyone for anything, but I won’t blame anyone so I’ll just blame myself (lol).

―― I thought BUCK-TICK achieved a point of perfection with darker than darkness. Then, both Imai-kun and Sakurai-kun decided to change things this time around.

S: Yes.

―― But even if you chose to change, won’t you end up looking at the disparate parts? That’s why you’d get the feeling it doesn’t come together as an album.

S: Do you feel that way?

―― Yes. Frankly speaking.

S: On the whole?

―― There are, of course, good songs but if we’re talking about the power of everything coming together to become one, as the album’s appeal as one work, I think it’s definitely your previous work that has it.

S: But, you know, the main reason for this is definitely because that guy was really too late.

―― But it’s not the first time, is it?

S: No, he really was too tardy this time (lol). We couldn’t really do much about it, you know, with the songs that came last.

―― You’ve got a schedule planned out this time around, though. With the film concert and all that, so I guess you were also in a situation where you absolutely had to stick to the predetermined release date.

S: It’s not great, is it? I especially hated that. But, you see, even though I didn’t say anything, my voice was crushed. We had no choice but to do it. Well, even if I said this, it wouldn’t have changed anything. Rather than having no release at all, we decided to bring it as close to 100% and release it, though. I think that’s the kind of mismatch problem that Onojima -san sensed. Be it between the vocals and the instruments or between different instruments. Although, there’s really nothing that can be done even if I complain about it. But although there are parts that you can’t digest, I think it’s fine as long as people still feel that it’s good. Because I feel that it’s very much a case where if you think it’s good, it’s good.

―― Do you think that the misalignment that you felt with Uta has been solved by the second half of the album’s production?

S: Mm…… Rather than solved, we just stopped caring about it.

―― Gave up?

S: It’s not that we gave up…… We thought that it sounded convincing, that it’s good like this.

―― Didn’t you wonder why you had to persuade yourself into believing that it sounds convincing? 

S: (Lol) Convincing myself…… I think it’s definitely because…… How do I put this…… It stinks but having formed such a band, I guess we’re just happy that we can do what we like, so it’s simply because of that…… Is this a boring answer?

―― No, not at all. Because it means that you’ve still got that fresh feeling.

S: No, rather than saying it’s still here, I think it’s more like I’ve been taking it for granted until now.

―― Oh? Did you have some sort of change of heart?

 

…… And that’s unfortunately where we’ll stop because we’ve run out of printing space. The latter half of this interview will be published in the next issue of this magazine. Look forward to it.

 

 

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_______________________

Hisashi imai

Interviewer: Oshibe Keiko

It might be contradictory to the work I do, but I’m fascinated by this breakthrough album that turns “genre” into a mere empty word, so much so that it makes me abandon the thought of critiquing or analysing it. That is usually a direct reflection of an artist’s views and instincts, and yet, although it’s convincing, it doesn’t tend towards logic. That is simply an abstrusity that comes from the fact that the album is not bound by the logic of genres. That said, this new album by BUCK-TICK might just be an abstrusity  in itself. Even if we tried to make sense of it with logic, it is an album that immediately turns the pleasant feeling of sensual enjoyment into something profound. In that sense, we could probably say that this work is an album in which Imai was given the ability to tackle his instinctive urges as a composer in a more direct manner than usual.

If we’re talking about nerve-wracking, I guess it’s my bad for being tardy with the composing (lol).
I did have the intention of finishing things up early, but somehow…… I wonder what happened (lol).

―― Well, anyway. In terms of creative inspiration, what’s it like? This time around.

Imai (I): Nothing particularly new. I don’t think it’s any different than before.

―― I heard that you were still coming with new songs even after all the rhythm sections were recorded, though.

I: Because I just kept thinking that there was not enough, and just continued composing.

―― What’s “not enough”?

I: A bunch (lol). Same with the overall balance too. But what I was really worried about were the songs which came first. They were really just vague…… They had this feeling that they were somehow lacking one other thing. Because I wanted to do that. In the latter half, the songs, it was just…… we were late with those because of small details like drum patterns and bass riffs, guitar riffs, these things.

―― Were there any instances where the final product turned out to be a whole other song, or you had new techniques you wanted to try out, or anything like that?

I: In terms of techniques…… There were songs that were made with programming too, so that’s about it. There wasn’t really anything special in the way we did things. But also because it feels like somehow, we haven’t really found our way out of it.

―― Did you have some kind of vision for this album on the whole?

I: Mmm…… I can’t quite put it into words.

―― Say, for example, the title. Did you have a specific idea in mind?

I: The complete opposites of North and South…… The North and South poles. I had that sort of two-sides-of-the-same-coin idea. I kept thinking about that for some reason. Then I figured that indicating it with 6 and 9 might be the easiest way to get the message across.

―― As something which symbolises the aspect of opposites coexisting.

I: That’s right. Not that it’s a good or a bad thing. Aside from that…… I’m not too sure.

―― So it doesn’t particularly hold any deeper meaning. It’s just a symbol for what you had in mind.

I: Yeah. It’s just because I had that North, South idea in the beginning.

―― I see. So earlier, we talked about your vision for this album, but what about for the previous album? Personally, it gives me the sense of being run through. In terms of imagery, it’s like a futuristic yet decadent landscape at the end of the road.

I: In a way…… I suppose I wanted to do songs that are more stripped down, noisier, those types.

―― I think that gives this album a sense of speed that isn’t just about being fast and also a kind of exceptionally weighty feeling, but did you deliberately intend to enhance those elements for this album?

I: Those aspects of weight and speed naturally occurred without any deliberate effort this time around. So for that…… It was just a matter of letting it grow.

―― I wondered if perhaps those elements were increased as a result of taking that image which inspired you and transferring it into the music at a higher level of concentration.

I: Meaning?

―― Like, maybe you had less doubt than before when you’re putting the song together. For example, the kind of hesitancy where the idea comes to you and then you think, “Maybe it’s better not to do this.”

I: Ahh. Well, that it’s good to speed things up and just do it once I get an idea was…… something I only realised in the later half of my composition work (lol). Because before, I’ve only always been…… aware of it.

―― That said, I felt that this album turned out to be rather frank, though.

I: Well, that’s the idea (lol). But I know that it definitely feels best when the groove really comes out strong like that. It’s just that I ended up taking a whole day to think about how the intro should go, about the rhythm patterns, and things like that. And it was hard to expand from there.

―― When did you start composing for this album?

I: Around December…… I think it was around then. Probably.

―― So at what point did things start to stagnate after you started composing?

I: The first song was done quickly. Then I redid the second song about 4 times at home. That’s why I have quite a number of different tunes that no one has ever heard before, though. …… At that point…… was when I ran quite far behind.

―― No one’s ever heard them before…… What kind of music is it? Those you’ve rejected on your own.

I: No, well. It’s just kind of music that we’ve never ever done before. I thought it might feel a bit wrong if we were to go with those.

―― That it’s not quite the type for BUCK-TICK to play?

I: Nah. It’s the songs themselves.

―― Ahh. …… So, there were quite a number of songs, weren’t there?

I: There were. That’s why I think we might’ve been able to wrap things up a little earlier if we just did the songs in the order that they came to me, though.

―― You mean, like the song you’re most interested in or whichever song you’re having the most trouble with at the moment?

I: The song that I was troubling with on my own was Kodou. Because its a song that’s easy to misunderstand. Depending on the way it’s captured

―― Specifically speaking?

I: It can be poppy and melodious and cute and pretty and all that. For BUCK-TICK to do that…… I was worried about whether the band could pull it off or not. …… But I figured that if I leave it up to Acchan, he’d get it. That’s why I handed the song over as it was.

―― Ah, so it’s not from the perspective of the listener. But rather, the song could end up with a completely different impression depending on your band members’ interpretations. So, do you think that it turned out well in the end?

I: Yeah. I think so.

―― By the way, earlier, Yagami-san said that the recording atmosphere had improved a lot compared to what it was before. Does Imai-san personally also think that such a…… change has happened?

I: Because it felt like a chore during our first album, second, and until our third album. The recording. We had no time, we had to do one song a day, we’d go into the studio and when everyone’s there, we’d start. It was…… a chore (lol).

―― (Lol) So, were you simply able to enjoy the recording work itself this time around?

I: …… Although, there were times when it felt like something wasn’t quite right (lol). But I think we were able to go through with it very very well this time around.

―― It’s just that in reality, I assume it’d often be nerve-wracking.

I: If we’re talking about nerve-wracking…… I guess it’s my bad for being tardy with the composing (lol) and that was really what made it nerve-wracking. Although, it wasn’t all that stressful once we got to the recording stage.

―― But because it was so nerve-wracking, wouldn’t you think, “I am definitely going to make sure that I’ll finish this up early next time” (lol).

I: If I did things with that intention…… If I did that, we’d probably end up in a position where we’d be saying there’s no way we can be any more polished than we’d ever been (lol). But really, I did have the intention to do that, you know? It’s just that somehow…… I wonder what happened (lol).

―― (Lol) Soー. How much time do you think is enough time to compose an album’s worth of songs?

I: ………… Until I’m done.

―― Until you’re done. That sounds like you’re going to take forever, though.

I: Nah. …… Nothing like that (lol).

 

 

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_______________________

Hidehiko Hoshino

Interview by: Sasaki Mika

There’s always an air of calm around Hide, reminiscent of his beautiful melodies. In this album, he has recorded 4 songs and he appears to have become more aware of his position. Is it almost time for the taciturn backseat rider’s counter attack!?

I thought it’d be great if every song would have its own strong character
and we’d be able to play around with the sound to turn it all into one album.

―― Did you expect this album to end up this lengthy?

Hoshino (H): Nope, I didn’t think that there would be so many songs. Because I thought the most we would have would be 12 or 13.

―― I wonder why it turned out like this.

H: Imai-kun is why (lol).

―― How did you feel before you started composing?

H: Personally, I didn’t feel all that…… How do I say this. I felt that I couldn’t see the entirety of it at all and that I’d just write the songs I wanted to write. We compiled it later anyway.

―― Without any discussion to say, like, let’s do something like this?

H: Yeah, we didn’t do that. Then again, in the end, even if I did discuss things with Imai-kun, the differences in our sensibilities and things like that will definitely come to the fore, so you could say that it’s absolutely impossible for any one of us to be the same as the other. Such conversations didn’t happen precisely because we did our own thing. We previously did have discussions about what kind of album we wanted to make on the whole, but this time was special; we didn’t have that.

―― So, what did Hide-kun personally hope for it to be like?

H: I imagined that every song would have its own strong character and we’d be able to play around with the sound to turn it all into one album.

―― Was this 2 year gap between your previous album and the current one planned?

H: Mmm…… I wonder. I wonder if it is (lol).

―― (Lol) What did you do last year?

H: Relaxed so much that I got tired of it.

―― You’re tired of it?

H: Tired of it (lol).

―― Did you write anything during that period of time?

H: Nope, not at all. I started composing when we started talking about releasing the first single, which was around the end of last year, I think. Around November or December. 

―― How many songs did you finish by then?

H: 2 songs. Uta’s b-side, Kimi e and one more. We dropped that one, and I originally composed Kimi e for the album but it didn’t feel quite right either so we used it as a b-side instead.

―― If Kimi e was included in the album, you’d have 5 songs in there, but this 5 was picked out of how many?

H: Around 8, I think. 3 were dropped.

―― But, by the time Hide-kun had already presented all your songs, Imai-kun’s songs had yet to be done, right?

H: Yeah. At all (lol).

―― In that situation, didn’t you think of adding more of your songs into the roster?

H: Nope, not really. (Lol) I did think of putting them in if we could, but in the end, if I wasn’t satisfied with the music as a demo tape, I wouldn’t release it anyway.

―― It appears that no matter what, it’s Imai-kun’s songs that determine the album’s direction.

H: Yeah, they do.

―― If that’s the case, then it feels like Hide-kun is always just sitting in the backseat along for the ride. Do you like being in that sort of a position?

H: Mmm…… Rather than saying I like it (lol), well, it’s the natural flow of things.

―― You can tune into what Imai-kun composes because you’d feel that it’s good enough for you too?

H: Ahh, that, I do.

―― Well then, please comment on Imai-kun’s music in this album.

H: There are a lot of cool songs. The songs in the latter half were made in a hurry but they’re really cool. Like love letter. I think this one was probably composed last.

―― But do I wonder why that person took so long.

H: Don’t you think that it’s simply because of the way he thinks? I guess he probably started late too, but it’s most likely because he works things out down to the details.

―― Does no one push him about it?

H: We do. We do, but it’s completely useless (lol).

―― What’s it like recording again after 2 years?

H: It was tiring. The hours were long this time, and there were a lot of songs too. The recording itself was very…… How should I put this? In the first half of our progress, I would go into the studio on my own and work alone and that was nice. Since there wasn’t anyone else around me, I could relax and take my time with it.

―― Do you like that kind of solitary work?

H: When it comes to recording, I prefer that. Because, after all, people sitting behind me in the studio will become a distraction. Especially when it comes to my own songs. It’s better for me to mess around however I want. Although this time, it took a long time to get to business after I was done with that.

―― Waiting around drains your motivation more (lol). That’s why it doesn’t feel like you made [this album] together.

H: Because there was a lot of solo work. Like doing things in different studios and all that.

―― Are you responsible for your own songs?

H: There is that, yes, but even Imai-kun’s songs are done by him going into a different studio to work on it on his own. We were being pressed for time so if we didn’t do that, we wouldn’t have made it in time.

―― Without thinking about how the 2 guitars would play together and things like that?

H: That was done to some extent in the demos so we just listened to that and played accordingly. We did discuss it, though.

―― And this Rakuen was a different version than the b-side to Kodou.

H: We did think of putting the single version into the album, but I got a bit selfish and asked for a version that removed the drums and bass and all that and only featured the tabla, and that was what we put into the album. Part of the reason was because I just wanted to try using the tabla as an instrument.

―― When did you decide on the album title?

H: Just recently. Around the time we were done with tracking.

―― How do you interpret this title?

H: I guess you could say it’s interesting. Deep.

―― I was hoping you’d explain this “depth”.

H: I’m also not that…… (Lol) I wasn’t the one who came up with it so I don’t really know but…… I think it’s got something to do with symmetrical opposites, like the north and south pole.

―― Maybe 9 songs are the key to the album?

H: …… Could it be? (Lol)

―― I’m asking you! (Lol)

H: Hahhahhah. Maybe not?

―― There are people saying things like, “It’s the BUCK-TICK revival!”

H: (Lol) That’s not our intention. Well, it’s true that it’s been a long while though…… Hasn’t it?

―― And there are a lot of new bands who people are labelling as post-BUCK-TICK too.

H: Really? Well, I’m not familiar with that so I’ve got no idea.

―― Aren’t you worried that you might’ve lost fans to other bands?

H: No, not really. No such thing.

―― No interest in the Japanese music scene at all?

H: None at all. Because I don’t listen to them, nor do I read the magazines.

―― So you separate yourself from the trends of the general public to create your own world?

H: Yeah, that’s probably it. Don’t you think that’s better? Besides, I think it’s good for people to respectively make the music they want to make.

―― Then, what kind of reaction to the album are you hoping for from your listeners?

H: It’d be nice if they like it.

―― That’s itー?

H: Yeah. Hahhahhah. No, really.

―― Did you think about including the general public with your core fans when you release an album?

H: Sometimes I do, in the end…… While it’s true that if we made pop music…… I don’t know if you’d call it a boundary, but there are times when I get very concerned about it, though……

―― Are you no longer bothered now?

H: Rather than now, it’s like, turning down the noise distortion on the guitar alone would give it a completely different sound. I’m doing all the things that I think are good, so I don’t really think about such things.

―― So, it’s good enough for you if you win over the undecided by doing whatever you want to do?

H: Yeah, that’s right.

―― I suppose you can only think like that if you have the confidence that you’ve made something good, right.

H: Yeah. I especially feel that this time around.

 

 

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yutaka Higuchi

Interview by: Sasaki Mika

We meet every month, but there’s no one who stays the same as much as Yuta. I think it’s a welcome addition to the band to have such a person as their bassist. Although, I would’ve liked it if he would write songs like before, if possible.

That Imai-san sure is a genius. That’s something I’ve reaffirmed when we started recording again after this break.
Because listening to the 1st and 14th songs, you wouldn’t have thought that both were from the same band, right? That’s why it’s fun.

―― What do you think of the final product?

Yuta (Y): There were so many songs that I wondered how it would turn out when we put it all together, but once we put the 1st song, the 15th and this one right in the middle (the 8th) between them when we were finishing things up, everything changed. Rather than the songs just playing one after another, they really brought about a clear image of the whole album.

―― Were these 3 songs an idea that came up at the end to bring some sort of completeness to the album?

Y: There weren’t really any songs that sounded similar or were of the same genre, so we thought they’d be good for that purpose. We’ve never made an album which started with speech either so I thought it could be interesting.

―― Is there anything in the way you produced this album that was different from what you’ve been doing thus far?

Y: Most of it stayed the same but because the songs were composed late, we were recording the rhythm parts until quite late in our schedule. At least, that’s the impression I have. But the way we did things was the same.

―― Was this the latest ever?

Y: Look, we haven’t even started recording the rhythm parts for other songs when we were already working on the tracking (lol).

 

―― Is that undesirable?

Y: It’s not that, but I was hoping that I’d have a little more time to rehearse my part.

―― Wouldn’t you feel uneasy when you can barely see the big picture for this album?

Y: I was more or less uneasy, yeah. But there wasn’t really anything like changes in the organisation [of work] or anything like that [so it wasn’t too bad].

―― You’ve said before that it’s easy to see what Imai-kun wants to do with his songs, so it’s easy when it comes to figuring out the arrangement too, right?

Y: Yeah.

―― Considering that, would you say that there’s likely a clear picture of the kind of album you’d be making in Imai-kun’s head?

Y: Hmm…… Probably.

―― Did he put that picture into words and share it with the band?

Y: Mmm…… There is a certain extent of communication with us when he’s done with a song so…… Yeah.

―― I wonder how he intended to bring out that sense of completeness.

Y: Mm…… I don’t know that much about it. About what’s in Imai-san’s mind.

―― Then, what does Yuta-kun think about it? As a member of the band.

Y: Like the vibe of the music. Since we had so many songs, I personally thought of suggesting to get rid of some if it so happened that things didn’t sound good together or anything like that. But it turned out nice when we tried lining them up anyway [so we kept them all]. It’s somehow like an atypical 2-CD set, isn’t it? The album’s got that kind of image.

―― What kind of role do you think this album will play in BUCK-TICK’s career?

Y: While we’re doing new things, this new album’s also still got the good parts of what we’ve done before. I personally don’t feel like we’ve used a different approach than our usual, so, yeah, we’re trying new things while taking all the good aspects that we’ve got since our very first album. That’s why I think it’ll be a very easy album to digest for those who have always been listening to our music.

―― So, you’re saying that’s what the album resulted in?

Y: Yeah. I think that’s unintentional.

―― When you say you’re doing something new, which songs are most representative of that?

Y: Probably these few, for sure (points at 9th, 14th, and 15th song). It feels like we’ve increased the number of different sides we have to us again. Compared to our previous album, we’ve completely switched up the atmosphere in this album, haven’t we? It feels like you can clearly see the vibe of each individual song.

―― I guess that might also be the result of the songs being worked on in batches rather than all together.

Y: I think that’s another big reason for it. We’re always working on one song at a time, but in the end, the totality of it, I suppose, turned out to be slightly different than our previous album. And this time around, the vibe of our previous album still remains in a good way. That’s why it wasn’t like we got rid of everything and started back from square one again. I guess you could say that it’s like our standard work but not quite.

―― A transitional album?

Y: …… I don’t know about that. Not yet.

―― How do you feel about making music with everyone again after 2 years?

Y: We make all sorts of remarks here and there so it was fun. I don’t quite remember exactly what they were if you want examples, though (lol).

―― Was it fun while playing too?

Y: It was. It’s just that there are too many one chord songs (lol). That’s why it can get a little bit boring playing bass, but on the contrary, I thought that made it more interesting too. Because then I could play it very thoroughly. I mostly played with my fingers this time around. I guess that was fundamentally different. I basically changed my play style. Deciding between my fingers and the pick is usually dependent on the vibe of the song, but this time, I felt that there were more songs that would be better played with my fingers so I naturally chose to go with that.

―― Which songs do you particularly like how you played?

Y: I suppose it’s these (points at 2nd, 14th, and 15th song). Ah, but I like all of them~.

―― No regrets?

Y: None.

―― You’ve done everything that you’re capable of at this point in time?

Y: I guess I feel that way too. But this time, I really felt, “Ahh, we’ve really made something great.” With the songs arranged in this order, it’s of course, don’t you think?

―― What do you think about the album title?

Y: It’s sleazy…… Actually, no (lol). What was it, something like, they’re actually the same even though they appear to be opposites. Like a sort of cycle.

―― Like a pattern?

Y: That can be rolled anyway you like. Like, something that has the same shape but turns into a completely different meaning once you roll it around. As to what it means…… I don’t know (lol).

―― Was there anything you’ve reaffirmed when you started recording again after that break?

Y: That Imai-san sure is a genius. That’s what came to mind. Because, although you’d get a particular vibe when you listen to this part (14th and 15th song), when you listen to the other songs, it’s a whole other feeling again. They bring something different that doesn’t exist in everything else you’ve heard. For example, if we look at Uta, it’s got a sound that’s unique to only Uta, right? That’s why I thought he’s really amazing.

―― So even if it takes time, it can’t be helped?

Y: Yeah (lol). Because listening to the 1st and 14th songs, you wouldn’t have thought that both were from the same band, right? It’s probably the same when we listen to the 2nd song too, though. That’s why it’s so much fun.

―― To me, I think that among the members, Yuta-kun is the one who is most aware of how people perceive you.

Y: Is that soー. I guess I am the type to care about how people see us.

―― Is it the one thing you think about the most?

Y: I wonder. But I think everyone wonders about how others perceive them, so I don’t think I’m all that conscious of it all the time, though……

―― You’re most in touch with the general public, right?

Y: But Imai-san’s the most popular, though?

―― Huuhー!?

Y: He’s popular. And he’s a people pleaser too. For me, it’s just because I talk a lot, right? The other members don’t talk at all but. Imai-san is a person who can explain things in 1 sentence where I’d take 10.

―― I see. Do you think that these 2 years were a needed break for the band to make this album?

Y: It was a good period of time for the band, wasn’t it? Not specifically because it enabled us to make this album. Well, I guess it plays a part, but I think it’s been a good 2 years. Besides, if we keep releasing things one after another, we’d look cheap. Although, if we really thought that it was good for us to release something every 3 months, then I think it’s fine, though.

―― As the big-name BUCK-TICK.

Y: We’re not big at all. We’re still rookies (lol).

―― But you’ve got tons of followers.

Y: I can’t say that. That’s for others to say. We’ve got our own hands full…… But that’s good, isn’t it? As long as everyone works hard.

―― As the headliners.

Y: I suppose so. Although we’re probably only ranked like maegashira-13¹ (lol). But I think it’s good enough if we feel that we really made a good album. Besides, this one’s got weight in it, doesn’t it? It’s over 70 minutes long. Quite something, isn’t it?

―― If you were to take a 70-minute train ride, you’d travel really far too.

Y: You’ll arrive at our hometown (lol).

 

 

Notes:

¹ In sumo, maegashira is the lowest of five ranks in the top makuuchi division. All the makuuchi wrestlers who are not ranked in san’yaku are ranked as maegashira, numbered from one at the top downwards. 13 is just one rank under the rank (14) that allows a wrestler to be promoted.

 

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Toll yagami

Interview by: Oshibe Keiko

“This is how it’s always been, but we don’t really keep to what we’ve grasped in our previous release. We do things as if we’re starting from scratch again,” said Yagami Toll. More importantly, it appears that new elements that are created through the band members interacting and influencing each other on stage will naturally tie into the next album. How has his own style evolved in that flow? That’s another part of the process we’ll find out as we talk about the album.

Even if Imai wrote JUST ONE MORE KISS for this album, we’d probably have tossed it out.
Because we prioritised our desire to do things that we’ve never done before for this album.

―― So, this album. Was there anything from your previous tour that you personally wanted to bring into it? Like something related to your drumming, or sensibilities.

Toll (T): Personally, there wasn’t anything in particular but…… Although there’s always been that wild aspect and things like that, I wanted to bring out more natural-sounding drums. That’s why I think most listeners might probably think that the drums sound muddy when they listen to it this time around. But I guess you could say that’s exactly what makes it a truly rare sound coming from the drums. When you hear most drums in the flesh, their sound would be muddy. But when it gets picked up by the mic, it’d turn into a really clean and beautiful sound, right? But that’s not reality, so there’s a part of me that feels that this muddy sound is contrarily better.

―― It seemed especially so in the intro of Kimi no Vanilla.

T: Yeah (lol). That was recorded with something like this (tape recorder for interviews). Because doing that created a really great effect.

―― That’s pretty extreme, but this kind of sound that seems as if you just walked into the studio and recorded on a whim is rather fresh, isn’t it? Gives it a unique vibe too.

T: I guess it’s because the muddiness of the drums itself makes it more real. We just did it with a simple, “How’s this?”, “Sounds good.” But it came together very well, didn’t it? That’s why I’ve had enough of processed, clear sound qualities…… then again, anything goes in these times, so I guess I just want to do things that other people don’t do. Which is why I told my friend’s kid who plays the drums, “Don’t copy me.” But the kid retorted, “There’s no way I can copy such a sound.” (Lol).

―― (Lol) On the other hand, was there ever a period of time when you sought to drum with precision for a clear sound?

T: Rather than seeking it, it naturally turned out that way. Probably like our 3rd album TABOO. I guess you could say it’s because we had a producer (Owen Paul) so I simply had to be precise. But that was also a lesson in a good way, and I get the feeling that it also led into the albums that followed.

―― Would you say that if not for that experience, it would only be much later on that you’d go in the direction that you’ve chosen for this album?

T: Yeah. It might probably only happen much later.

―― But in the past, I used to have the impression that you’d go all out drumming the 8-beat pattern, yet recently, it’s like you’re more toned down or something. For example, I noticed that you’ve shifted towards the idea that drums are supposed to be an instrument played by humans and that’s what they should be.

T: I’m not all that conscious of it, though. It’s just the way it is now. That’s why I’d say that if we’re talking half a year ago or half a year later, I might feel differently too. But, you know, our recording sessions used to be very tense, but now, I can even think about how roughly or relaxed I want to drum. In the past, I wouldn’t say that it was autonomic dysfunction but there was turmoil similar to that. It’s as if your head’s always spinning (lol).

―― Was it really that bad (lol).

T: Yeah. But I won’t be able to drum well if I get too excited either. Because that happens, I decided to get very relaxed for in darker~. Up until then, I had been drumming at full power like crazy but once I decided to do that, I somehow started to feel the groove in chunks. But I wanted to produce a rounded sound, you know. It was completely different once I started drumming with leeway to spare. It’s definitely because I could move freely when I did that. …… But for this album, I didn’t really think about that. I just wanted to drum so…… It might spell trouble for me to say this, but I don’t really know whether I did well or not yet (lol). Although, there’s a strong sense of accomplishment. But, simply put, I lose interest quickly in things that are immediately obvious. There were aspects in darker~ like that, but comparing that album to our current one, I think that album might still be easier to comprehend than this.

―― Could that partly be also due to the idea of making music with the listeners in mind having faded off?

T: But for us, we’ve never done that since the very beginning (lol).

―― Since the beginning (lol). Ever since you debuted?

T: Yeah. We’ve really been doing whatever we like. That’s why, I’m grateful that we do get sales to a certain extent, though (lol). But if we do something badly, it’s just for our own satisfaction anyway, right?

―― Then, do you get the sense that having made it this far, you can now do something like this too?

T: I don’t, not really. It’s just how things turned out when we gave it a go. We don’t even consider things like, “Shall we go with an easy to remember melody?” (Lol). Because we decide whether something is cool or not based on our own standards. Like, if one of us said, “Isn’t this tacky?”, that thing would get tossed out.

―― This perspective on how good something is, are the members of the band always in agreement over it?

T: …… Before, oftentimes Imai would say, “This will definitely be a good song so let’s do this,” and I’d retort, “This isn’t ever gonna work.” (Lol). But that doesn’t happen so much any more. In any case. We have to respect the other’s feelings (lol).

―― So, if there’s even the slightest disagreement, you’d have to put in the effort to understand each person’s opinion on what’s cool (lol).

T: Because we’re a democracy (lol). Majority wins. Whenever we have to decide on something. …… But the songs that Hide wrote in the beginning were very pop. I thought that was incredible. But Acchan said, “It’s not the kind of music we’re doing now.” And Imai’s one word of, “Old-fashioned.” (Lol).

―― (Lol) Did you decide to deliberately eliminate pop music or something like that? For this album.

T: Mm~n. That’s why I think if Imai wrote JUST ONE MORE KISS for this album, we’d probably have tossed it out. It’s not that we’re intentionally eliminating anything pop, but more than that, it’s because we prioritised our desire to do things that we’ve never done before for this album. And when I think of totality, that song comes to mind, so that’s just it.

―― Ahh, I see. By the way, how did the recording work itself go? The sense of fulfillment after completion seems to be quite high, though.

T: But it was tiring (lol). Because, so far, the rhythm portion has always been the very first thing to be recorded, right? But this time, even though we’ve started tracking the music, we were still recording the rhythms (lol).

―― That’s because there were songs that were handed in quite late, right (lol).

T: Because Imai is a slow starter (lol).

―― How was it compared to the last time?

T: It’s the first time that things dragged on so long.

―― Won’t it mess up the pace? Your own too.

T: Even if it would, there’s nothing we could do about it, right? Besides, we’ve even posted the ads (lol). When I saw it, I thought, “It’s going on sale sometime in May. Can we make it?” (lol). At first, when we finished recording 11 or 12 songs, I thought, “Ah, I guess that’s all of it.” But then, Imai said something like, “I’m working on 2 songs.” But I guess he wanted to keep working on it until he was satisfied. You know…… It happens all the time, but we were told that the manufacturer was waiting for us. They stopped production.

―― (Lol) Amazing. A band that stops even the factories.

T: Hahahaha.

―― But is this recent pace of releases ideal for BUCK-TICK? For Japan, it’s come to a point where the average is to release one album a year. Compared to that, you’re taking a little bit more time, though.

T: But that, you know, is because it’s business, right? Releasing something every year. So, thanks to this, my annual income has been cut in half (lol). Because we didn’t release anything last year too. …… Kukukuk. We’re poor (lol). I was shocked when I filed my tax return. Like, “I can only save this little.” (Lol). That’s why, from a business point of view, I’d like to push something out every half a year or so (lol). But, you know…… In the end, it’s unrelated, isn’t it? [Music and] whether it makes business sense or not.

 

 

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Direct Dialogue — Hisashi Imai vs Dai Onojima

The controversy over Uta finally comes to an end!!

Mr Onojima’s criticism of Uta from 2 issues ago caused quite a stir, prompting Mr Okamoto and Mr Ohno to bring a re-examination of the song in the last issue, but I believe, in the end, to truly settle this controversy, we had to wait for composer Hisashi Imai to make an appearance after all.
In this article, Imai shows up to answer Mr Onojima’s questions about Uta and Six/Niɴe as well.

How will he counter Mr Onojima’s scathing comments?

Uta was written in the spur of a moment. It’s only natural that there would be split opinions, but that’s fine.
I’ve come to feel a lack of freedom with the format that we’ve done our songs in thus far, because you can see already where we’re heading with it.

Back in the March issue, I wrote a rather critical review of BUCK-TICK’s single Uta/Kimi e. There were a lot of responses to it including those from the band members, so this article was written to ask them, especially Hisashi Imai, the one who leads the band in their sound direction, for their counterarguments and their creative intentions.

However, since that article was written back when I had only listened to the single, the criticism I wrote was only focused on that song in the single, so now that the album is complete and Uta has now taken its rightful place in it as one of the tracks, it doesn’t make sense for us to continue discussing just that one song. And so here, we will be looking at the overall album concept and flow, which includes Uta.

The very first thing I can conclude is, Hisashi Imai is Hisashi Imai after all. “No matter what critics may say, I will do what I want to do and when it results in something that I’m proud of, I don’t particularly care about criticism or anything like that.” That is what Imai said in a nutshell. He truly is a man who goes his own way. And that’s fine. He makes music. I talk about music. Those are the things we have to do in our respective professions.

First, we started talking about the production concept of the single Uta.

“With that guitar riff, the song was quickly finished. I wrote it without thinking too hard. We chose to feature this song as the single because it’s been quite a while [since our last release], and we thought that it would perplex listeners especially because it’s a song that sounded like a chorus without a chorus, something unlike anything we had ever done before. I think it’s only natural that there would be split opinions about this song. Like some may get surprised or wonder, ‘Uhー what’s this?’. But that’s fine, I don’t really care.”

In other words, not only did he, to a certain extent, expect criticism like mine, he is also saying that he made a controversial piece of work that was bound to stir up discussions. Regarding my comments about how the imbalance between the singing and the music was a problem, this was what he said.

“Even now, we’ve got heavy-sounding songs like Deep Slow and Ao no Sekai anyway. So I don’t like it when people tell me that. Because we’ve put in the effort to make sure that these songs won’t sound like that too. But, well, I guess what will be will be. It’s just the kind of song it is anyway.”

That is to say Imai means that he doesn’t want the verdict of whether his music is good or not to come from people who received a sample CD for free, people like me. He clearly states that the only people who are qualified to judge his music are “those who spent their own money to buy the CDs”.  Then, I asked whether he meant that his music should only be judged by record sales, he answered, “Well, yes. Because all kinds of people will be listening to it.” It appears that his reasoning is that the assessment of music is based on personal subjectivity, and the only objective standard is record sales. But it doesn’t mean that good music will definitely sell, nor does sellable music necessarily equate to good music.

Next, the production concept of the album.

“So far, we have had concepts that could be described as ‘heavy’ or ‘dark’ and so on, but I didn’t want to make something around those concepts this time. I wanted [the album] to give the feeling that something else had escaped, like an additional something to the music that BUCK-TICK has been making thus far or something. The feeling that you can see where we’re heading with the style that we’ve had until now. In other words, I’ve come to feel a lack of freedom with the standard format of songs which start with an introduction, followed by the verse, then the chorus, and a guitar solo, and so on.”

I suppose this means that the BUCK-TICK sound that they have established thus far has turned into something that is no longer inspiring to Imai. That’s why their new album is actually a collection of different types of songs with a variety of arrangements. There are songs like Uta too, which are heavy yet are in no way one-dimensional. It’s a good thing, but rather than giving me the impression that [the album] “holds a rich variety”, it feels more like an album that shows the difficulties of using trial and error instead. To that extent, I don’t get the same power of completeness that darker than darkness has from this album, neither do I sense anything close to a deep conviction. Instead, all I get is the feeling that it is still on the way to completion, with songs that sound like ambient techno that, depending on how you listen to them, feel diffusive and out of focus.

“I wonder. I wanted to include a variety of songs, and I sure did include them. But I didn’t want [the album] to feel frivolous, like we simply tried to put different songs together. Yet, on the other hand, I thought it’d be very risky for us to fill up the album purely with songs like Uta.”

Following his experience with Shaft and other external projects, I think the horizons of Imai’s own creative appetite has grown all of a sudden. Imai, who had only known nothing but the band that is BUCK-TICK until recently, has started to possess an urge to express music beyond the category of BUCK-TICK. And as a result, perhaps a gap has appeared between the things he wanted to express and the band’s range of allowance. To put it differently, therein lies the question of how he can turn what he wants to do into reality with the present band. These troubles are now more clearly visible than ever before.

“Right. So how are we going to execute what we want to do together as a band of 5? But it’s also not as if it’s impossible to perform this song without being in a band.”

However, there is one thing I’m uncertain about regarding his reason for being so particular about doing things in a band and as a band. Let’s say, even if drums and bass guitar were excluded depending on the song, while guitars and vocals were taken depending on the occasion, BUCK-TICK is still BUCK-TICK and this doesn’t diminish the importance of each member or their unity. Somehow, although the things he wants to do have long since gone beyond the restrictive category of bands, he’s giving me the impression that deliberately forcing himself to squeeze into that small frame.

Imai himself says that he believes that his band mates understands his intentions. 100%. But I’m under the impression that apparently, communication with his bandmates wasn’t always smooth this time around. It feels to me that as a result, this shows in the vocals-music balance in Uta, in the album’s overall unfocused ambiguity, in how conspicuous it is that the album is the aftermath of ups and downs, and all these things. I do wonder whether Imai had no choice but to stick to his insistence of the “format” of a band because there wasn’t enough mutual communication involved. Or perhaps, this opinion is just a little too farfetched.

After I wrote my review of Uta, I had hoped that I would change my assessment of it after listening to the album. But honestly speaking, even after I’ve now heard what Imai had to say, the murky feeling I’ve got hasn’t disappeared. I think there’s no one who praised Kurutta Taiyou, Koroshi no Shirabe, and darker~ more than me. However, when I listened to this new release, it did not hit me with an impact that got me feeling, “Amazing! They’ve won me over!” or a freshness that made my heart throb like those albums did. Those albums had a monstrous power, asense of unity that forcefully pins the listener into a corner without leaving room for negotiation. I suppose it can be said that I was overwhelmed by the immensity of their talent which grew with every new album they released.

However, even if this time’s BUCK-TICK release was “hard work”, I cannot say that it was their “best work”. Perhaps, BUCK-TICK are now at a critical juncture in their career. At least, that’s how I feel.

 

 

Return to Top

 

 

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Scans: Endless Dei (@DeiEndless on Twitter)

 

Related articles:

[Apr 1995] Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll: Review of BUCK-TICK’s Uta/Kimi e Single

[Jul 1995] Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll: Part 2 of Atsushi Sakurai’s interview

The “Plague Repelling Spell” BUCK-TICK Speaks Of

BARKS.jp
18 September 2020

 

The latest issue of the “rock magazine to read”, ROCK AND READ #091 will hit the shelves on September 19. This issue’s front features Sakurai Atsushi and Imai Hisashi of BUCK-TICK who will be releasing their 22nd album, ABRACADABRA on the 33rd anniversary of their major debut, September 21.

Also joining Sakurai Atsushi and Imai Hisashi within the pages are Hoshino Hidehiko, Higuchi Yutaka, and Yagami Toll. All 5 members of the band will talk about the album ABRACADABRA and each track on it individually.

ABRACADABRA, their first original album to be released in 2 and a half years was finally completed after a brief pause in recording activities because of COVID-19, but at the same time, it has turned out to be an album which was aptly born out of such a production situation. Furthermore, the interviews are said to give a fulfilling glimpse to the behind-the-scenes of the album’s production with content like the messages which Sakurai conveys through his lyrics and why the album has been given the title of a plague repelling spell of Abracadabra.

In addition, the magazine includes an article which discusses the “Buck-Tick Phenomenon (Bakuchiku Genshou)” that occurred 33 years ago in 1987. It will re-examine all of this while looking back on the intent behind the stickers which were pasted everywhere to announce their 1 April 1987 concert at Toshima Public Hall, the significance of their major debut with their 21 September 1987 Buck-Tick Phenomenon at THE LIVE INN (Bakuchiku Genshou at THE LIVE INN) concert video, their Tokyo Dome performance in 1989, and their documentary movie Gekijouban BUCK-TICK ~Bakuchiku Genshou~ (The Buck-Tick Syndrome I).

 

■『ROCK AND READ 091』, releasing Saturday, 19 Sep 2020 

■ Related links
ROCK AND READ Official Twitter

 

 

 

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Source: https://www.barks.jp/news/?id=1000189036

“Kogoeru” to be Ending Theme of Yamishibai (Iki)

Natalie.mu
14 August 2020

 

It has been announced that BUCK-TICK’s new song, “Kogoeru”, will be the ending theme song of the TV Tokyo late-night drama Yamishibai (Iki) [Shadow Picture Show – Live] premiering on Wednesday, 9 September.

Adapted from the popular horror anime Yamishibai directed by Iguchi Noboru, Yamishibai (Iki) is a live-action drama produced by TV Tokyo and Dear Stage. The ending theme song “Kogoeru” is a striking new song with lyrics written by Sakurai Atsushi (vocals) and music composed by Hoshino Hidehiko (guitar), with chilling lines that serve to highlight the sense of dread present in the drama. This is one song where BUCK-TICK’s style of pop-sense and dark world view shine.

Sakurai shared a few comments in response to the band’s involvement with the provision of the ending theme song. With regards to the song itself, he explained, “This song is about a sorrowful soul who wanders between that world and this, and from this world to the next.”

“What a blessing it is that (this song) is to be the lullaby which draws everyone to the edge of darkness in the aftermath of Yamishibai. I will be waiting for you on Wednesday in September, before the dead of night at Yamishibai (Iki). Do your best to make sure you don’t forget.”

Comment from Sakurai Atsushi (BUCK-TICK)
It is a great honour that this time, BUCK-TICK’s Kogoeru
has been chosen to be the ending theme song for Yamishibai (Iki).
I hope that we can contribute some deadly flowers to the world of television drama, even if just a few.
This song is about a sorrowful soul who wanders between that world and this, and from this world to the next.
What a blessing it is that (this song) is to be the lullaby which draws¹ everyone to the edge of darkness in the aftermath of Yamishibai.
I will be waiting for you on a Wednesday in September², before the dead of night² at Yamishibai (Iki).
Do your best³ to make sure you don’t forget.”

 


Premiering: Wednesday, 9 September 2020 at 25:28~25:58*
(※25:28~25:58 on every Wednesday thereafter)

 

 

 

 

Notes:

¹ Instead of using the modern-day reading of 誘う, さそう (sasou), Sakurai has seemingly deliberately chosen to use いざなう (izanau), an archaic and more uncommon reading of it which is more exclusive to poetry or literary works these days. A notable instance where Sakurai chose to use the “izanau” reading that I can remember off the top of my head is in Ai no Souretsu (lyrics).

² Here, Sakurai used 長月 (nagatsuki) rather than the usual 九月 (kugatsu). Nagatsuki the name that was used for September in the old Japanese which was adapted from the Chinese lunar calendar. Nagatsuki literally means “the long month).
On the other hand, Sakurai used 丑三 (ushimitsu) to state the approximate time of the show’s broadcast. Under Japan’s ancient time-telling system, Ushimitsu is the period between 2:00 AM and 2:30 AM. Certain hours of the day such as Ushimitsu-doki (the dead of night) and Omaga-doki (twilight hour) were thought to serve as boundaries to the sacred area. Omega-doki is probably around 6 PM, dusk.

³ Sakurai used 努努 which reads “yume yume”. I’d bet my coin it’s a wordplay which, once again, revolves around 夢 (yume) – dream. Because, of course it is.

* Yet another interesting thing about Japan is that they denote hours past 24, as seen above (25:28). Basically it’s to state that a particular show starts after midnight or a place’s business hours extend beyond midnight. So in this case, 25:28 will be 1:28 AM. Just subtract 24 from the hour.

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Source: https://natalie.mu/music/news/392069

BUCK-TICK comments for Forever Shinjuku Loft project

SHINJUKU LOFT
May 2020

 

 

As a brief introduction, Shinjuku Loft opened in Nishi-Shinjuku in October 1976, moved to Kabukicho in April 1999. It has a history of more than 40 years to date.

Since the end of February this year, many performances have been cancelled or postponed to prevent the spread of COVID-19, and after the government declared a state of emergency, Shinjuku Loft has refrained from business activities. If the voluntary restraint on business continues, the survival and history of Shinjuku Loft, which has been in business for more than 40 years, will be in jeopardy.

“Forever Shinjuku Loft” was launched as a support project. The organising committee will be working on various support projects for the survival of the Shinjuku Loft, including the production and sale of distribution programs and donation goods.

More information can be found on their official website here: http://www.loft-prj.co.jp/LOFT/forever/

The members’ comments are as follows below:

 

 

The first time I went to Shinjuku Loft was for a BOΦWY show (30 Mar 1984). I remember going to a pub with the members after the live and getting to talk to them as if it was yesterday. BUCK-TICK’s first performance was at the “Taiyo Matsuri” [Sun Festival], an event held by Taiyo Records. I remember that it was a very happy occasion for us because this was the one live house that we wanted to perform at the most ever since we all moved to Tokyo. In recent years, they took care of us again when we shot a PV here. Personally, I come here every January for the annual drummers’ meet. I feel that Shinjuku Loft has been an asset to our musical cultural heritage ever since its founding in 1976. Right now, it’s facing a difficult situation but as a number one fan of Shinjuku Loft, I hope that it will be able to reopen again soon.
<Yagami Toll>

When I first moved from Gunma to Tokyo in 1985, Shinjuku Loft was already known as the source of rock music, and as the live house which has produced numerous wonderful artistes. And even now, I still remember that it was BUCK-TICK’s goal to perform on this stage and the excitement that I felt for our first stage performance. Now, because of global COVID-19 infections, we have entered tough times and Shinjuku Loft, too, is in crisis. Let us all cooperate and work together to overcome this crisis so that many more artistes may have the chance to perform on Loft’s stage in future.
<Higuchi Yutaka>

The checkerboard stage that is admired regardless of era! I hope that Shinjuku Loft will stay on forever! Let’s aim for it! I’m rooting for you!
<Hoshino Hidehiko>

✌️ PEACE! We are strong
<Imai Hisashi>

For now, let’s hold on together and endure through this. Spring will come. Stay strong until then.
<Sakurai Atsushi>

 

 

 

 

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Source: http://www.loft-prj.co.jp/LOFT/forever/

Datenshi, PARADE Ⅲ Feature

PHY Vol. 15
February 2020

text by Ishli Eriko (imai, higuchi), Kanemitsu Hlrofumi (sakurai, hoshino, yagami)
photographs by CHITO
hair&make-up by Tanizaki Takayuki, Yamaji Chihiro (FAT’S BERRY)
styling by Shimizu Kenichi

costume by
kiryuyrik 03-5728-4048
DIET BUTCHER SLIM SKIN 03-5728-4765
原宿VILLAGE 03-3405-8528
UK EXTRA 03-3311-1992
JULIUS TOKYO STORE 03-5728-4900

 

I feel that the one who has to shoulder that burden is me
Because singing about it saves me

You’ll understand as soon as you listen to their new single, Datenshi; that BUCK-TICK has entered a new mode, and that unchanging strength and resolve of theirs. Two years ago, they released their album No.0 in which they incorporated their imagination and message to the fullest. It was a work they stuffed to the brim with the diversity of worldviews which the band possesses, but this single, which brings us a sign of what to expect from this band in 2020, has shown us the complete opposite; a powerful sound which is full of gaps. That makes it a simple yet distinctive sound. From this, originality which can only be produced by these 5 musicians can be heard. That is also the forte of a band which is heading towards their 35th anniversary, and, at the same time, it is also a resolve which stems from the unavoidable awareness that an end will come sometime.

In this special feature, we will explore the present and future BUCK-TICK from various perspectives. Through personal interviews with the members based on their new song, Datenshi, and, celebrating their tribute album PARADE III ~RESPECTIVE TRACKS OF BUCK-TICK~, which will be released at the same time as their single, there will also be a dialogue between Higuchi Yutaka and TOSHI-LOW (BRAHMAN), along with an interview with ISSAY (DER ZIBET) who will talk about the draw of BUCK-TICK and Sakurai Atsushi.

 

 

 

 

 

Individual Interviews

_______________________

Sakurai Atsushi

Interview by: Kanemitsu Hirofumi

Knowing that everyone is watching us with all these thoughts and emotions
It makes me want to get my act together, like, I have to do my best

―― I’d like to hear about your thoughts regarding THE DAY IN QUESTION which concluded last year-end.

S: I’m relieved. Because although there was only one new song while the rest were familiar tunes, I’m constantly plagued by worries about my throat. But I somehow managed to do it.

―― It’s an annual affair on 29 December, but having had to perform at Yoyogi National Stadium First Gymnasium rather than at Nippon Budokan, how did you find it?

S: The first thing that came to mind when I entered the venue was, “The audience is rather far away…… I feel bad.” It was difficult for the audience in the back to see, wasn’t it? I hate to say it, but Budokan is where I find it easiest to get the audience into it and that makes it great, though.

―― Well, you’ll be back at Budokan on this year’s 29 December anyway.

S: I don’t think it’s all that great to perform in large venues, and I think for us, we don’t have to aim for that any more, do we? (Lol). Big venues, they’re not suitable for us. Not really.

―― No, no (lol). The last song, LOVE ME, was just wonderful.

S: That song, I think it was Yuta who said that he wanted to perform it. He felt that it might be nice if we shared a sense of unity with everyone at the end.

―― That’s true.

S: The lyrics are quite messed up, though (lol). But since these people have made it here to watch us perform, I’m happy that it can bring us all together and excite them (even if) that’s the kind of song it is.

―― That was a great end to the year, wasn’t it?

S: It was. Last year, I had quite a lot going on in my private life too and I was in the hospital again, and quite a few ups and downs…… It got me thinking, “Just get it over with!” (lol). (At the end of the year) I got that sense of “Is it finally over?”. Though, it’s not as if (going into the new year) changes anything in particular.

―― And among all of that, Datenshi was produced.

S: That’s right. There’s one other song which was a candidate too. That’s another really nice one. We more or less already decided that we’d go with that one, but then Imai Hisashi pulled out another song. Which was the one which turned into Datenshi. The other song which we had decided on was a very nice medium-tempo song, but we felt that (it would be better) if this could turn into something that was edgy and aggressive even to us…… So, we were able to really venture into Datenshi. 

―― Why did you want it to be aggressive?

S: The first two songs that we completed were very gentle songs. Unlike their finished version, Luna Park, too, initially had a very relaxed tempo. If we lined up those two songs together, (the single) will leave the impression that it’s like an extended version of Moon Sayonara wo Oshiete. Then, just as we were thinking, “Hm… I’m not sure if this is a good idea,” Datenshi came along, so, that was a lifesaver. (With the determination that) I’ll torment myself as badly as I can with this.

―― What do you mean by tormenting yourself?

S: To say,  “You’re no good guy, are you?” (Lol).

―― It’s okay to be a little nicer to yourself, though.

S: That may be true, but I end up feeling that if I torment myself, the real me will emerge from that, you know? It’s funny, but it was the first day of work at the office yesterday, and we (found out that we) received hundreds of mail from the fans since the end of last year (lol). As I read them one by one, I was once again reminded that I had to firmly stand true to what I really feel.

―― Meaning?

S: You see, everyone comes to our concerts with different emotions in them. There are those who are parent and child travelling from far away to come and watch us, and there are also those whose loved ones have passed away. Knowing everyone is watching us from the back of Yoyogi with all these thoughts and emotions, it makes me want to get my act together. Like, I have to do my best.

―― But on the other hand, I believe that there are those who also feel, “You don’t have to shoulder all that burden, though……”.

S: Rather than a burden, it’s an encouragement, you see. It’s the reason why I would want to stand (on stage). To exaggerate, it’s because to me, “to do my best” is as good as a battle with myself.

―― So, you’re saying that it’s necessary for Sakurai Atsushi to be like this and face himself.

S: But it’s just for those few hours. On stage, that would be 2 hours, and during recording, I won’t show my face (to an audience) but (the final product is) something that we’ve worked hard on and condensed into an album for people to hear, so if I do this right…… That’s really how it is, but I guess, maybe it helps a little. Because I usually am a really hopeless man. And today, I’ve made this much of a mess of my face too (lol).

―― (Lol) Haven’t you ever thought that it would be nice if you could get all of that done while being a little more relaxed?

S: As long as the fans enjoy it, I don’t care if people write or say bad things about me. I’m not bitter about it. But it’s not easy (for me) to deal with myself…… Well, I’ve said it hundreds of times, but it’s a matter of what’s learned in the cradle being carried to the grave. And now, I’m the same age as my father. It’s getting more and more ingrained in me, isn’t it?

―― This is something we’ve been talking about for decades now.

S: Yeah, having known Kanemitsu-san for decades, there were times when I wondered when I’ll ever feel better*, but it doesn’t look like that will ever happen (lol).

―― Is it the fear that you might be just like that father of yours?

S: After all, the same blood flows in my veins. The misery and the hate are always…… there, you know? Our blood types are the same, and even our birthdays are the same. That’s a 1 in 365 chance! Can you believe that?   Our faces are exactly the same too. And now, we’re the same age.

―― You definitely can’t help but feel something.

S: I get the feeling that something’s pulling me. Like, come here…… I’m just kidding, though (lol).

―― I don’t want to hear about it even if it’s a joke!

S: I guess so. My elder brother said to me, “Hang in there until you turn 54,” but…… We’re back on this topic again, huh (sigh). Let’s stop.

―― Well, because it’s like a routine (to talk about it)**, isn’t it?

S: Shall we talk about Valentines’ Day or something?

―― Wahahahaha, why so sudden!

S: Maybe we can make a guess of how much chocolate we’d receive or something (lol).

―― Why would I even enjoy competing with Sakurai Atsushi over how much chocolate I’d receive (lol).

S: No, no, no, I mean, a ton (of chocolate) would arrive in the editorial department, right?

―― They don’t (lol). But I have to give my age a little bit of consideration too.

S: Well, age is one thing, but this personality is really…… something that I’ve come to realise I can’t get run away from. I thought I was prepared (to do that), but I guess I really can’t escape from it, can I? I’ve also spoken about this numerous times, but in present-day terms, we’d say that my father committed DV***, right? Domestic violence. My father beat my mother on a daily basis. That memory has always stuck with me, always frightened…… Well, it’s the usual story, though.

―― Apart from that memory, have you ever wondered how far you can go from this point on?

S: I have. Although I’m aware that I have to take it easy and live life following my experiences of getting hospitalised and so on, at the same time, I also wonder how long I can keep doing that. I’m doing what I love so I can somehow discipline and inspire myself, but if I get sick, then, it’s as if my father’s calling me……

―― So we’re going back to that topic.

S: We are (lol). That’s why I want to turn 54 as soon as possible. But I’ve been blessed in the sense that I get to do what I want to do, and recently, I’ve been getting a really strong feeling that I’m doing it right, so when I can find it in myself to say that I’m happy, I am happy.

 

I may make people wonder, “Is he alright……”, but I’m happy. I am.

―― In what areas do you get the feeling that you’re doing things right?

S: When I’m satisfied with our own work. When we put out works that I feel good about. When there’s even a little bit of that although it may not be 100%. It’s because we have music and songs like that that I can say, “Ah, well, I suppose it’s alright.”

―― And also, because you have band members who understand such a Sakurai-san, right?

S: That’s the best part, isn’t it? Though, we don’t usually talk much anymore (lol).

―― Hahahahaha.

S: There are times when I’d spend a couple of days with Imai-san and Hide but we don’t talk at all. It’s just that when we finally realise, we didn’t talk about anything at all (lol). But they consider things from a vocalist’s perspective; there is this invisible care for me. Simply because we’ve known each other for 35 years now. We no longer have to say anything for us to fully understand the other party, and when I’m as tense as I am now, they’ll just let me be too.

―― Perhaps it’s because you’re working with these people that you can express yourself.

S: Perhaps. If we’re talking about the stage, though, Imai-san will come and interrupt my singing (lol). At points when I’m like, “But I wanted to sing it well here!” (Lol). But performing while having such thoughts is something else that is interesting in a band. Like, “Ah, just now, Anii made a mistake,” and so on (lol).

―― Ahahahahaha.

S: As long as I’m on stage, I’m enjoying myself even when I start thinking, “Ah, that just now was off. I definitely went out of tune…… Ah, I’m never getting over it.”  That’s why it’s fun to be in a band, isn’t it? It’s because the other members are around that I’m given the ability to do what I love.

―― Do you have aspirations of wanting to become a certain way or something like that now, at 54?

S: Uh, like perform at Tokyo Dome and the like? (Lol)

―― That’s what Anii spoke of when we went drinking (lol). He said, “I’ll play at Tokyo Dome for my 60th birthday!”

S: He says the complete opposite of what I say (lol).

―― Hahahahahaha, indeed.

S: Anywhere’s fine as long as we can hold a concert. Well, I’d love to if I could, though…… But first, the immediate future; I’d like to ask for our next song as soon as possible (lol).

―― Imai-sa~n, Imai Hisashi sa~n (lol).

S: Ahahahahaha. But the fact that he mentioned his “60th” with “Tokyo Dome”, I have to say Anii’s rough plan is really great (lol). I think that’s also something that has been helping me, you know? It encourages me and makes me aware of things I haven’t thought of, things that I couldn’t have done alone.

―― So, what kind of dreams does Sakurai-san personally have?

S: Ah, well…… I don’t have any. You know this very well, don’t you? (Lol) I’m incapable of doing anything if I’m left to my own devices, and I’d probably be a man who won’t even leave his bed (lol). Though, going to a snowy mountain and freezing to death without anyone finding out about it…… I think it’s just so beautiful, that’ll be nice, I guess.

―― Please stop that (lol). Didn’t you say before that you’d like to live deep in the mountains in the middle of nowhere and spend your life making pottery?

S: But now, I think it’ll be troublesome to learn how to make pottery or even spin the potter’s wheel (lol).

―― You’re getting worse!

S: Because I’m a klutz (lol). Before (this interview), I happened to catch a glimpse of the footage on WOWOW (note: 29 December’s performance at Yoyogi National Stadium First Gymnasium) and I thought,  “You’re an idiot, man.” (lol).

―― Ahahahahaha. Was it the MC?

S: Yes (lol).

―― When you tripped on your words, and then had your embarrassed face show up on all the screens (lol).

S: Don’t you think that’s so stupid?

―― Nope. It’s cute.

S: Hahahahahaha.

―― Don’t everyone in the audience love this Sakurai-san?

S: I’m grateful for it. Although, I feel like I have to do my best and become something like that rockstar who everyone admires……

―― No, I don’t believe that everyone expects Sakurai Atsushi to be cool all the time.

S: I’ll try my best.

―― So what do you hope for this year?

S: I don’t think there’s anything (going on this year) that will bring in interview requests. I’d like for myself to remain healthy, both physically and mentally. Since I’ll feel down when I get sick, I just want to stay healthy as much as possible (lol).

―― You’ve announced that you’ll be releasing a new album this summer. I’d expect that you don’t have all the songs yet, but what do you hope for this album to be?

S: Earlier, I mentioned Imai-san’s song which was a candidate for the single, which wasn’t Datenshi. That was a really great song. It’s Imai Hisashi and Sakurai Atsushi’s music, and lyrics, and song. This might just be the best we’ve ever had…… That said, if we raise the bar too high, that might just be terrible (for the future) (lol).

―― No, no, no, it’s good!

S: I feel that it’s turned out to be a really great song. I think that it was a good thing that Datenshi was made this single, but we really had problems with deciding to the point that we were debating until the very very last minute so…… That’s why I want people to listen to it first as soon as possible.

―― What are the lyrics like for that song?

S: Ahh. You’d probably think, “This again?” (Lol). But although I do feel that I’m talking about the same things, I think there’s nothing I can do about that anymore. Because even if I try to twist things, I’d end up feeling that it isn’t me. It’s not that big a deal, but I do feel that the one who has to shoulder that burden is me. Because singing about it saves me.

―― In other words, it’s something that will never change no matter what happens, like your earliest childhood memory, something you learnt as a child that you’ll bring to the grave.

S: That’s right. I can’t force it. Even if I borrow a concept from somewhere else and decide to perform that, all the things I like are going to be similar anyway, so I can’t run away from it. I can’t be a professional (if I do that). But that does, indeed, appear to be my place. On the contrary, I don’t really know where I belong in everyday life (lol).

―― What do you mean?

S: If I’m working, I know for sure that my dressing room, the centre stage mic, and standing on stage with the other members to sing is where I belong, but when we revert to our regular lives, there are times when I don’t really know where I should go…… I’m pretty sure I come across as a serious man like this.

―― I know (lol).

S: When it comes to work, too, I’ve been late, but I really give my all, you know? (Lol). That’s why it ends up taking a toll on other areas, like family^, and so on.

―― Ah, I see. You’re trying too hard to be BUCK-TICK’s Sakurai Atsushi. 

S: I’m normally as good as an invalid (lol).

―― Hahahahahaha. But it’d be distressing if it disappears, wouldn’t it? Your place of belonging.

S: That’s why I feel that I have to cherish it, whether I’m in my on- or off-mode. Because I’m thankful that there is a mic being placed centre stage for me, and that there’s even a light being shone on me.

―― For this person that you are (lol).

S: Yes. I’m happy.

―― And that is what everyone seeks. We feel that all is well if Sakurai-san is happy.

S: Thank you. I may make people wonder, “Is he alright……”, but I’m happy. I am.

 

Notes:

* The phrase used here was “晴れる (hareru)”, which is usually used to describe sunny weather.

** The original phrase is “業みたいなもの” but the problem here is, I can’t tell if “業” is being read as “gou” or “gyou”. If read as “gou”, then it would mean “Karma”. While as “gyou”, the more common reading, it would generally mean “work” along with all other similar connotations. I’ve gone with “gyou” to say that it’s “routine”, as in something that is done/brought up on a regular basis – like work. Because I honestly don’t think Sakurai is being plagued by this out of some Karmic reasoning.

*** That’s apparently the abbreviation used in Japan.

^ Family here doesn’t literally mean familial relationships. “家庭 (katei)” rather than “家族 (kazoku)” was used, which refers to general nuance of having/starting a family.

 

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Imai Hisashi

Interview by: Kanemitsu Hirofumi

While I was figuring that out, somehow, what came out from inside of me was something that had been sort of sticking out like this which gave off a somewhat deviant feeling
Kind of like the enjoyment of things which fall outside of the rules. Somehow, that was the kind of image that came to mind

―― To start, how did you feel about the 5-show nationwide tour for THE DAY IN QUESTION?

I: Good. I thought it was good.

―― I got to watch your performance in Tokyo too. It felt strange seeing that it wasn’t in Budokan.

I: About that, since it was our first time performing there, I couldn’t really get a proper feel of the sound either. And I was performing without in-ear monitors.

―― Huh, you were?

I: Me and Hide, us two guitarists didn’t use them. That’s why I wondered how the sound would turn out in this case. Budokan is the venue that we’re most used to performing at after all, and while there’s a certain enjoyment in playing at Yoyogi, there was also a bit of unease. But after we gave it a shot, there was nothing to worry about, I guess.

―― Is there a reason why you performed without in-ear monitors? I’d assume that it’s more natural to use them when there’s that much noise being made and being played at the same time, though.

I: No, well, I’ve kind of always…… not used them (lol). I think it depends on the song, but if I’m wearing them, I feel that I can’t quite grasp the atmosphere around me, and I’d be hearing clicks in them…… Like, that’s not very fun is it?

―― Hahahaha!   So rather than (wearing the in-ear monitors), your synchrony with the band and feeling the atmosphere in the venue is more important.

I: Yeah. So, well, I’d just do as much as I can anyway, until I have to ad lib. But, well, then…… I’d start wondering about whether in-ear monitors are really that essential or not, though.

―― Because it seems like it isn’t since you can go that far (lol).

I: But during Locus Solus at Makuhari, there was a point when I went all the way to the front without wearing in-ear monitors. I had to play based on intuition then.

―― Intuition. It’s amazing that you didn’t play out of time.

I: Naaah, I think I did?   The others had quite a few things to say to me, though (wry smile).

―― Also, the setlist which you had for THE DAY IN QUESTION gave me the impression that it was the opposite of the setlist for Locus Solus.

I: Ahh, I guess you may be right. But it’s not as if we deliberately aimed to do that. THE DAY IN QUESTION doesn’t have any particular concept either. The closest (thing we have to a concept) is, “Let’s have fun every year.”

―― Or, “Let’s come together every year-end.”

I: Exactly. Although, that’s why there are also occasions when we’ll bring out lightly thematic stuff moment by moment. Also, we generally tend towards darker (themes) while at the same time leaning towards more upbeat (music). It feels as if we have everything, doesn’t it?

―― Yes. Well then, moving on to the topic of production, you’ve been composing since around last summer?

I: Yeah. Well, relatively early. I started composing at the stage when I started thinking that maybe it was about time for me to make preparations.

―― For Imai-san, do you compose only when you decide to? Or is it an accumulation (of compositions) regardless of when they come to you?

I: Nah, I don’t do accumulations. Although I do occasionally go into my workroom and write a memo or do something like that on a whim.

―― What kind of themes or hints came to mind when you decided to compose?

I: Mm…… There wasn’t really any in particular, but, well, I thought that as long as I started working on it, something might come up. So, while I was figuring that out, somehow, what came out from inside of me was something that had been sort of sticking out like this which gave off a somewhat deviant feeling. Kind of like the enjoyment of things which fall outside of the rules. Somehow, that was the kind of image that came to mind. Even now, I can’t quite put it into words though.

―― At the same time, “deviant” is, in other words, pretty much “the usual BUCK-TICK”, isn’t it?

I: That’s right. And that’s why the more I say it, the more I end up getting the feeling that we just keep going round and around the same things. When I talk about this feeling in this particular circumstance…… it feels like, “This isn’t all that much of a concept, though” (lol). That’s why I’d first start with an album that we had already made, and then take it somewhere different. To somewhere where (I can find) interesting elements.

―― So you’ll be taking No.0 somewhere different.

I: Yeah. I’ve been thinking that I want to do something interesting. We have 2 guitarists, a vocalist, and a drummer and a bassist. And I’m wondering if we can do something interesting with that structure, the way the sounds overlap and so on. Something like a slightly different kind of band sound than our usual. Whether or not that’s possible, I’m still figuring it out.

―― Are you talking about (looking for) something that is yet unknown from within your band’s style?

 

I: Yeah. Like, “is there still anything that’s kind of amazing, and intriguing (in here)?”

―― That’s a very interesting sense. And that’s despite that we’re in an era where bands as a structure is most certainly said to be, “Something old, a thing of the past”.

I: That’s true. But it’s also something that’s normally considered as cool; the sense that something which is cool, is cool. But if you’re too consumed by that and only that, then it’s like, getting your priorities wrong, like, you’d find yourself in a situation where you don’t know what the hell you’re doing (lol). That’s the feeling I have now. Maybe I’d go in a more electronic direction, or maybe I won’t even have guitars in (the music). Nothing has solidified yet, at all.

―― If we’re talking about Datenshi, it’s based on rock n’ roll, right?

I: Ahh. Well, because that very first riff is a riff that came from somewhere.

―― A riff from somewhere (lol).

I: You know, that’s a very simple riff, and it’s not as if I started composing the song because I thought, “Ah, this riff is cool.” It really is something that can already be found somewhere.

 

I think that if we do things in accordance to a demo, we won’t be able to go above and beyond. We can’t just follow what’s there
Instead, I think we need to break it down a little or take a little out and loosen up so that we will be able to do even bigger things

―― Though, it’s true that for a moment it sounded as if it bordered on becoming a parody. Like, (a parody of) T. Rex or something similar.

I: Exactly. It’s a very simple rock riff, like a representative of that. I’m really glad that it turned out like that. And from (that riff) came the image of (a song that’s) a slightly peculiar kind of pop which includes (elements which are) somewhat radical and cutting, and noisy and disquieting.

―― And that’s also a deviation from the image itself, isn’t it? This is a very extreme example, but Imai-san, have you ever thought of being in a band similar to Ramones?

I: Mm…… Well, I’ve released 2 albums with the band Lucy, though. For those, well, I ended up adding a variety of sounds into it once I started working on it, but it was originally a band which started out being tied to a simple rock n’ roll concept, you see. That’s why I got the idea that it might be interesting to go all out (with the concept). After all, there’s also beauty in being able to do nothing but that.

―― It’s the same with SCHAFT, too, right? It was tied to the industrial genre. Is no such thing in BUCK-TICK at all?

I: Yep. None. If anything, I guess you could say that these types of rock n’ roll and industrial genre music that you just mentioned, these old-school styles (of music) is not what (BUCK-TICK) goes for.

―― You don’t go for old-school styles (lol). To seriously and thoroughly pursue one particular genre is an engaging route to take too, but I suppose you’re not very interested in that?

I: Mm…………… Nah, I don’t really think about it.

―― Hahaha.

I: I just go for whatever happens to catch my interest at that point in time. Because I think that’s how it naturally works. And the whole band comes together for a meeting before we start recording, but we don’t talk about things like, “This time, we’re doing this and this with that concept,” y’know? Though we always do it here.

―― Ah, in this room in Victor Studio?

I: Yeah. We talk here, and if we happen to have demo songs on hand, we’d listen to it, then we’d go for dinner…… That’s when the conversation gets serious, though (lol).

―― Yuta-san said this previously, that Imai-san’s demos are quite vague or something.

I: Recently. It depends on the song, but if it’s, let’s say, a song with a four-on-the-floor dance beat, I’d usually play the bass (first) with the root note. (Then I’d tell Yuta) something like, “I probably don’t have to say this but you’ll play something that hits hard, right?”

―― So you leave that to the band members.

I: Yeah. I think it’d still turn out to be an okay song even if I don’t go that far. Because I suppose they can already do it without needing me to fill in every single detail.

―― So, it’ll always turn into something with a BUCK-TICK flavour no matter what you do. But is this something that’s only came about recently?

I: It’s recent. It was like this with Kemonotachi no Yoru, and also, this new single. Before these, I’d put in a lot of effort to elaborate on things down to rather minute details, but it’s not quite…… Even I started to get the feeling that (being so particular) makes things kind of boring. It’s like, there were moments when I thought that maybe things would be more interesting if they were not done exclusively to my preferences. That’s why, when Yuta asks me, “What do you think about this?” I’d say, “I don’t really like it but it’s fine.”

―― Must you say that (lol)? But it seems to me that people who don’t get those notions can’t be in a band. Since there are also people who will create entire tracks on their own and think, “If I can play everything on my own I’d be my own band, though.”

I: Such people definitely don’t (belong in a band) (lol). But really, in the beginning, I was that sort of person too. I’d start composing the demo, put everything together on the computer, decide on how every melody should sound and say, “This part must not, cannot be changed.” That’s all I was like. I was really like that even up to just a few compositions ago, but gradually, I started to get moments that made me think that perhaps it would be more interesting if I loosened up a bit on that area. Also, when, for example, Anii gets a drum phrase wrong, I’d be like, “Ah, maybe sounds better that way,” and so on.

―― So, the singing changes a lot too? Compared to the demos?

I: It happens. Because Sakurai-san would mostly change what was initially sung in English into Japanese. When he does that, the vibe would definitely change, and when Sakurai-san picks up the notes in his own unique way, when he covers it the way only a vocalist can, he gets me saying, “Ah, it’s better like this.” I think, after all, a demo tape is just a demo and if we really do things in accordance to it, we won’t be able to go above and beyond. I guess we can’t just follow what’s there. Instead, I think we need to break it down a little or take a little out and loosen up so that we will be able to do even bigger things.

―― That’s also a kind of deviation, isn’t it? This might sound like a simplistic question, but why does Imai-san hate rules and lines* so much?

I: Nah, I don’t hate them. It’s more that I prefer to remove them. Because I sometimes do think that it can be interesting to be tied down by those and go along with it. That’s why I think, in the end, I guess what I’ve decided to do is to just ignore the rules.

―― What’s the best part of that, I wonder? I suppose it might be an exaggeration to compare it with the discovery of a new world, but I guess it’s the feeling of wanting to find something that has not yet been found by anyone else?

I: Ah, that, there is.

―― Or is it that you have a spirit that simply hates following a format and just wants to destroy that?

I: Ah. …… Nah, I think it’s even simpler than that. It’s just the desire to create something good, something cool. But it includes a feeling just like that “discovery of a new world” you mentioned which gets me wondering about whether I will find anything interesting. It’s vague, but that’s a thought I have all the time.

―― Right.

I: So I guess I do actually get that feeling. Of excavating something that has always been there and feeling like, “Ahh, I’ve found it.” It won’t be anything that I’ve come up with on my own. Rather, it’ll be something that was originally already there, and I’d occasionally manage to excavate it. Something like that. There are times when it feels like that.

―― So, you don’t come up with (music) in your own head?

I: Ah, of course, there are songs like that too. Songs which are shaped through my messing about. But also I think that there is a method of song composition which isn’t done like that; which is (done by) finding something or occasionally excavating something.

―― That’s the continuing adventure that the 5 of you are on.

I: That’s right. Also, while there are, of course, things that we need to spit out, we’re all making things, aren’t we? As creators. I think that every one of us have the mindset that we’re creating music as composers. I believe we’d stop if the thought of, “Ahh, this is troublesome, I don’t want to do it anymore” wins, but generally, we’re consciously writing music and lyrics, you know?

―― Everyone?

I: I think so. The other band members too, and Sakurai-san too. Everyone’s composing. Not that it comes naturally or automatically.

―― Even for Yuta-san and Anii-san who don’t compose music?

I: Yeah. Those two would first listen to what we give them and then they’d go into the studio and practice. Then, after they’re able to play or drum (their parts), they’d say, “What do you think about this phrase?”. And that’s when they compose. That’s how I think they keep creating. I also get the feeling that this probably wouldn’t happen if I was in a band with other people instead.

―― It’s because it’s the 5 of you that things are like this.

I: Yeah. Exactly, that.

―― It’s amazing that even now, this creative drive hasn’t stopped. When I heard that the band was going to take some time off after Locus Solus, I thought for a moment that you might start some other project or maybe Lucy would make a comeback.

I: Ahー, I didn’t think about that. Or rather, I didn’t actually consider taking time off at all.

―― Ah, I see. I thought maybe you got yourself refreshed in some way.

I: Nope…… Not really. Not in particular.

―― It’s just that when I consider the simplicity of Datenshi’s riffs, I thought, maybe, at the very least, darkness and weightiness isn’t what you seek now, is it? Less is better.

I: Ah, yeah. That’s right. That isn’t rock or anything close to rock, but (if we were to classify it) it’s more towards pop. I think I paid more attention to music that classify as pop songs (when composing), and even the lyrics too, they have a lightness unique to Sakurai-san. In the sense that I think that’s the sort of thing that he managed to put into them.

―― By the way, I heard that Sakurai-san was pretty depressed last year, though.

I: Ahh. Well…… There was a period when I thought that he kept silent for the longest time, though. But, well, not particularly. Around him, we just…… let him be.

―― Right (lol). But it indeed does sound like there’s a strong pop flavour in the song too. Especially at parts like the “Ah ha”.

I: Yes. Exactly.

―― Considering the melody of Luna Park too, can we say that “pop” is a hint of what your next release will sound like?

I: Well, I suppose. Yes. I believe we can deliver something really interesting.

 

 

Notes:

* The loan word “レール” (rail) was used rather than line but I used line because it doesn’t quite make sense in English to say “rules and rails”.

 

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Hoshino Hidehiko

Interview by: Kanemitsu Hirofumi

I guess, maybe I felt a sense of liberation within myself when I composed Luna Park?
It was a little before this, but I suppose I wanted to compose something that felt far out

―― Now, it’s just before the show at Yoyogi National Stadium First Gymnasium (note: this interview was held on 26 December), but to start, tell us about the response you’ve had so far for this THE DAY IN QUESTION tour.

H: It’s our year-end live show that we’ve consistently held for 20 years, even as a tour too. It’s something we’ve been doing consistently so I think we’ve been able to make it unique to this year too.

―― Rather than simply being chock full of nostalgic songs, I was left with a middle era impression. Or rather, that there were a lot of songs from your BMG Funhouse* days.

H: It wasn’t intentional but that’s certainly true. When we band members picked the songs, lined up our choices and then sorted them out, that’s how it turned out. In the beginning…… I think it was probably Yuta who suggested that we start with Muma-The Nightmare. He said, “We’ve never done that before so don’t you think it would be interesting?” We then made our selection based on that and this is sort of the kind of setlist we settled on.

―― What songs did Hoshino-san request for?

H: None in particular (lol). But Dokudanjou Beauty -R.I.P.- wasn’t part of the initial song selection, so I guess I suggested that. Also, I wanted to perform Snow white but Yuta also brought that up so it’s not as if I made any particular appeal for it (lol).

―― Even though it’s Hoshino-san’s song (lol). How was the year 2019 for you?

H: Well, it wasn’t a year when we were constantly on the move due to live shows, so it was sort of a year when our flow got switched up. In the first half, there were a few rescheduled shows we had to do, but after we were done with Locus Solus no Kemonotachi at Makuhari, it felt like a grand closure to the flow which we kept up until then. It had the impression of, “Alright, off to whatever’s next.” But, well, going on such a trajectory is something that we’ve imagined and scheduled since some years ago, right?

―― So, in other words, it was a year of actively working on production.

H: Well, I can’t really say that either (lol). 2 songs were presented for the single this time around, but both of them were songs which had been sleeping in my PC (lol). We decided for Datenshi to be the single so we were looking for a song which would couple well, and we thought that this one was suitable.

―― Do you have a lot of those stock music?

H: Nope (lol). Though I’ve got some riffs and bits and pieces of stuff in there.

―― Well, then what kind of impression did Datenshi leave on you?

H: I guess it gave off a bit of a new wave vibe. It’s not exactly pumping rock music but neither is it light. That part is what reminds me of new wave. Also, it doesn’t feel as if it’s being filled up (with sounds), but there’s a stronger nuance that (if there was just a little less) it would break apart.

―― Imai-san used the word “deviant” (to describe it). In the sense that this song excludes bass lines where one would expect it.

H: Yeah.

―― I suppose that means he’s looking for intrigue that cannot be found by following (music) theory but have you heard about anything like this prior to recording?

H: He didn’t say anything in particular when we were previewing the demos, but maybe that topic came up while we were having drinks after that?   In No.0, both the music and the worldview were built rigidly and it was a work that we can no longer add anything more to, so he wanted to do something a little more broken down next…… At least, I think that’s what he said. Probably. I can’t really remember (lol).

―― Why’s your memory fuzzy (lol).

H: Because we were drinking (lol). But because of that, this time around, we pulled back a little on the guitar bits too where we would normally go rugged on the riffs.

―― Meaning?

H: For example, during the interval, we raised the guitar bits up higher than usual around the middle to create a spaced out feeling and things like that. I think that these particularities which we applied in our production will only increase as we move towards the next album. Besides, Imai-san bought a weird effector and has been messing around with it too (lol).

―― Do you think that doing this will bring about something like a change within the band?

H: I do think so. I’m guessing that if we keep each of these areas in mind, we’ll be able to apply this to different songs so this might affect the album a lot. Whatever it is, we’re headed in that direction. I think it’s going to feel like everyone’s in step with each other.

―― But there’s also a completely unbreakable Hide melody in contrast to that, like in Luna Park.

H: You brought up the melody, but we didn’t have plans to include that song in the album, to begin with, because it was just a song that we thought would work well as a coupling. As something which matched Datenshi.   

―― Ah, so it was a song that you put out for the sake of balance.

H: Yeah. I guess, maybe I felt a sense of liberation within myself when I composed Luna Park?   It was a little before this, but I suppose I wanted to compose something that felt far out.

―― I see.

H: But before I put this song out, I had another that I had made a demo of up to its interlude, and I thought of going with that one but it felt too mid-tempo, you know? I figured that it wouldn’t match well as a coupling song so I pulled back on it and then brought Luna Park which had been sleeping in my PC.

―― Ah, you made that decision to reel it back yourself?

H: If I wasn’t told, I think it might’ve just gone out as it is (lol).

―― It’s just a balancer after all (lol).

H: But isn’t it of course that we want to do things well as a band?   Although, we do intend to release a bigger variety of songs on the album.

―― But it’s true that in BUCK-TICK, you don’t eliminate songs or remove (ideas) from your heads just because it’s “wrong”. You basically give it a try anyway.

H: You’re right. We don’t really…… do that, I think. Everyone thinks rather positively with the notion that it’ll probably get better when we try it out. So the responsibility placed on me is greater in that sense, but all I’ve ever experienced is the result of my songs turning out better than I expected. That’s why no one denies (any ideas). (There’s this sense that) if we do it as a band, it’ll probably turn into something interesting.

―― So, that’s why if you think that it doesn’t work, you’ll pull the idea back yourself.

H: Yes, exactly. Also, I’ve recently been around Cube-kun (Cube Juice) and Yoko-chan (Yokoyama Kazutoshi) and YOW-ROW-kun (GARI). So there are now more people around me who do manipulator work for us. Each of their musical flavour is different, so we don’t really get the same things from them, and there’s also a part of me that looks forward to the changes (to the songs) which come from them. There’s a lot of that chemistry these days.

―― Are you saying that in other words, you’d throw them something that will serve as a sort of base and they’ll do a bit of arrangement with it, put in the music and return it to you, following which you’d get inspired by it and that will give shape to the song?

H: That’s right. I guess you could say that’s the recent trend. It’s something I really look forward to.

―― Both of these two songs involved Cube Juice, right?

H: Yeah, it just so happens. Perhaps it was Cube-kun who wanted songs, though.

―― I see. This special issue will be published in 2020, but I’m getting the feeling that you more or less know your direction for this (2020) year.

H: Well, there’s also a large possibility that there’ll be a 180-degree change, though (lol).

―― Hahahahaha. But you’ll be doing lots of things this year, right?

H: Yeah. We plan to produce the album and go on tours too. I think it’d be nice if we could announce that at Yoyogi, though (note: they announced the album’s projected summer release and a national hall tour in autumn).

―― Definitely. And in your upcoming 3rd tribute album, it’s given me the impression that you’ve gathered an even more unique and interesting lineup than ever before.

H: You’re right. It’s the most varied one we’ve had so far, isn’t it?   There are quite a few female artists too, so that will probably bring about an impression unlike anything thus far. And there’s a wide range of genres too.

 

When I see the smiling or crying faces of our audience from the stage, I get reminded that this is why I do music
I get to see that this presence that is BUCK-TICK is so sought after by everyone

―― Are there any memorable songs for you?

H: Ringo-san’s Uta is amazing, isn’t it? People won’t normally go with such an approach; singing (our songs) in English and arranging it like that. It surprised me. Also, Fujimaki-san’s** song was nice too.

―― This also came up in my conversation with Imai-san too (note: the interview published in the February issue of Ongaku to Hito), but he said that there are 2 Fujimaki-san’s in this tribute album (lol).

H: Aah (lol). That’s true. Fujimaki-kun’s*** song was nice too, of course, but I’m talking about Fujimaki-san** who did Konayuki (lol). It’s only on occasion, but we meet for soccer so I thought I’d talk to him about this next time, but it feels as if the strength of that song comes through because he was singing while playing the guitar. I believe it’s something that one can’t do unless they have confidence in performing with that style.

―― This is an insight coming from BUCK-TICK’s acoustic master, huh (lol).

H: I thought it was really good. All the other participants carried it out in such unique ways and we wanted them to make the songs their way, so I’d say the album turned out really well. Listening to this made me feel once again that the merits of our band’s songs really stood out too.

―― That’s true. And you’ve also commenced recording work for your album.

H: Early, isn’t it? 2020 is an Olympic year too.

―― Are you going to watch the Olympics? (Lol).

H: I don’t think I can (lol). I’d assume that there’ll be a lot of people around during that period and I won’t be able to get around much, so I’d probably hole myself up and work in the basement. I think we might be going on tour after that too.

―― You won’t be able to go to the southern islands too.

H: I won’t be able to during that period, so I guess I’ll go after recording is done (lol).

―― You’re going? (Lol) But I believe you’re thinking of making this another solid year of activities for BUCK-TICK, right?

H: Yeah, for the second half.

―― I wondered if all of the band members might start getting the desire to do something that is different than the vibe they’d get from being in a band following the success of creating an album with as high a level of completion as No.0, but I’m getting the feeling that this isn’t the case.

H: Well, I don’t know about that. I would suppose that each of us has different thoughts, although it is true after all that we’d feel a sense of accomplishment after producing No.0 and performing our live shows. But I don’t think that this would be reason enough for us to feel like we want to try something outside of BUCK-TICK?

―― I do wonder why that is.

H: Hmmm, I wonder why.   Based on what I personally feel, that (lack of desire for something else) is the reason why we’ve been performing live shows like THE DAY IN QUESTION  for 20 years, and when I see the smiling or crying faces of our audience from the stage, I get reminded that this is why I do music. That is, in the past, whether we’re writing music or performing shows, it was mostly for ourselves. We would mostly do whatever we wanted to do at that point in time, so I suppose we were pretty egoistical, though. But seeing the audiences’ faces, realising that this presence that is BUCK-TICK is so sought after by everyone makes me want to share that space more and enjoy it with them.

―― I see.

H: My awareness of the band might’ve been slightly different in the past than now, but I will never ever get tired of this.

―― Those are strong words. I suppose we can say that whatever you’ve built up with the fans has become a strong motivation for you.

H: Yes, yes, exactly. Personally, I guess I want to see the faces of people who come and watch us. I’ve somehow come to feel that way, you know. Like, “Ah, I want to see them again. That was fun.” I feel that this is the kind of relationship that we have right now.

―― That’s a great story.

H: And that’s the moving tale that I’ve come up with (lol).

―― Don’t be shy, now (lol). Well then, I guess it looks like there won’t be a Hoshino Hidehiko solo anytime soon.

H: There’s no chance of that anymore.

―― Y-you made a vow (lol).

H: I didn’t, right? Surely (lol). I don’t feel any motivation towards that. And I think that’s the same for everyone now.

―― Indeed. I can feel that the unifying force within this band of 5 has grown even stronger after No.0. Like a strengthened resolve that you 5 will make things work no matter what happens.

H: That sums it all up. I don’t think there’s anything else aside from this, and I guess this alone is enough to keep us all filled. I suppose it’s important to direct our energies outwards too, but I’m getting a little old for that, you know. Didn’t both Sakurai-san and I fall ill in 2019?   When I think about that, I feel that I’d rather give my all to working on what we already have and do the best I can. After all, I don’t know when I won’t be able to play as BUCK-TICK ever again.

―― I assume there’s a sort of a flipside to that.

H: There is. Well, it would be great if I had the energy to direct outwards too, though. Those who will leave us will leave us anyway (lol), but right now, I want to make sure that I do right by the band.

―― I can understand that. No one knows how long it can go on for, and that’s why you’re now exuding the desire to do whatever you can now while you can.

H: I think that’s precisely how everyone feels now. I’m not looking to confirm that this feeling exists, but I can sort of sense that everyone probably has that on their minds. The kind of sense you get from knowing each other for years (lol).

 

 

Notes:

* BUCK-TICK was signed to BMG Japan between 2000 and 2010, which changed its name in 2009 to Ariola Japan. BMG Funhouse is a subsidiary of BMG Japan.

** Referring to Ryota Fujimaki who covered Just One More Kiss. He covered Konayuki (粉雪) with ToshI (X Japan) in December 2019’s edition of FNS Music Festival. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nipXhWb_Gs

*** Referring to Maki Fujii of minus(-), Soft Ballet. He worked on the cover of Keijijou Ryuusei with Chiai Fujikawa.

 

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Higuchi yutaka

Interview by: Kanemitsu Hirofumi

I personally feel that there’s still a lot more we can do when it comes to creating music among the five of us
This feeling that there is still a lot we can show off is very much alive in me

―― We’ll start by looking back on last year. So, Locus Solus no Kemonotachi happened in the first half.

Y: Yes. Locus Solus wasn’t an album tour and neither was it our usual THE DAY IN QUESTION, so we started by coming up with a different title before we brainstormed. We also got to perform our new songs, so I think it was a great show.

―― There were some firsts too, weren’t there? Like performing your encore set at the centre stage, and that unbelievable pro-wrestling style entrance.

Y: Pro-wrestling style entrance (lol). That stage extension was pretty long, wasn’t it? And playing in the middle with everyone was fun too. Gathering there and squeezing together, we were even closer to each other than we’d usually be in our rehearsal studio (lol). We really haven’t performed together in such a small space in decades, so it was somehow nice in a way.

―― That space was probably as small as the studio you used in your early days, right? Do you remember those days?

Y: Ahー, Koenji’s…… I wonder if it’s still there?   PAL Studio*. But I also think it’d be nice if we could do new things like these going forward.

―― Though, I’d expect that it can be stressful to do something for the first time or challenge new things.

Y: Yeah, well, but I want to do more of what we’re capable of. Because even I can feel that there’s still a lot that the five of us can do together, and that our live performances are only getting better and better. That’s why I want us to do more and more together.

―― You’ve come to realise that for yourself and can proudly say it here too. This is nice.

Y: After all, we’ve come all this way without stopping. Especially considering that I started out having only played bass for a year or two by the time we debuted. Keeping at it, I more or less grew to understand how to play well, but that’s not the focus of what I’m saying. Now, when the five of us come together and make music, I can distinctly feel that we’ve gotten good. That’s why I feel that we’ll only get even better. Yeah…… Although, it certainly is weird for me to say that myself (lol).

―― No, that’s a good thing. Doesn’t it often happen that it becomes difficult to see how else you can grow after doing the same thing for so many years? And instead, (rather than that,) you’d be thinking about your physical limitations first.

Y: No, well, it’s because I personally feel that there’s still a lot more we can do, you know? In terms of expressing something or creating music with the five of us involved. This feeling that we still have a lot we can show off to the people who are always waiting for us is very much alive in me.

―― You’re putting emphasis on “the five of us”, aren’t you?

Y: Yes. Isn’t BUCK-TICK made up of five people anyway? (Lol). Of course, we do have the support of our staff, but it’s always been the five of us going through all sorts of experiences together. The laughs…… Well, there weren’t many tears, but there were a lot of fun times. Even during our tours or rehearsals, we still get that same feeling when the sounds made by the five of us come together for the very first time. It’s not (the kind of feeling that) gets us grinning, but there’s a comfortable tension.

―― Is it something similar to the moment when high school students enter a studio and sound their instruments?

Y: Yeah. (It happens whenever) we do something together or play together. Would it be weird to say that this in itself brings me joy?   I really enjoy it. I can’t quite explain it well, though.

―― It’s amazing that this hasn’t turned into a monotonous routine to you. Such feelings don’t last that long between a married couple, for example.

Y: As you’d expect, it’s because our composer Imai-kun has a lot to offer. And usually, there’d be things that I have to study up on too. That’s why, although it might be dependent on the song, the thought that something is a bore has never crossed my mind.

―― So, for this single’s Datenshi, what did you think of it when it first came up?

Y: A rock-flavoured song. In the demo tape stage, Imai-kun filled in the vocals so that (version) had quite a strong rock-flavour to it. And I thought it’d turn into something pretty good once Acchan sings it.

―― I heard that the initial candidate for the single was something different.

Y: Yes. It’s a slightly milder song, but when it came to deciding which we should release first, we went with Datenshi. Well, although Hide wrote a song too, (we went with this decision because this song is one where) Imai-kun wrote the music while Acchan wrote the lyrics. I believe, after all, that’s the image which the songwriter and the lyricist have when they think about what it is they want to put out at this point in time. So, I suppose in a way, (we’re making the decisions) according to that.

 

―― By the way, how do you see Imai-san as a composer?

Y: ……Vague.

―― Vague (lol).

Y: He always says, “Like this,” but he’s only got a skeleton of things like the bassline done, so when I change a certain part some way I like, he’d say, “Okay, okay.” He doesn’t really push for things to be done according to the demo he made himself. Maybe rather than that, it’s more about (composing) it together and expanding it to him. That’s why I say he’s vague.

―― I see. I haven’t asked everyone but the original demo is rather different than what goes on air, right?

Y: Exactly. Basically, the impression it leaves is different. After all, the bass is the part which gets recorded first, so with every song, I’m always wondering, “How will this song end up sounding?” This single’s Luna Park was (initially) completely different too. In the beginning, it was a British-sounding demo tape. Once the vocals and music were added in, the image of the song changed a lot and brightened up a lot.

―― Ahh, that electropop programming wasn’t there in the beginning, was it?

Y: It wasn’t there at the start. I think Hide probably did that through a manipulator’s mastery, but I really thought that it became very pop.

―― Does such a thing often happen?

Y: Yeah. It’s also because Imai-kun would steadily make changes along the way. Even though he’s the one making the demo tapes, he’d more often than not add in something completely different midway. It might sound strange when I say it like this, but this is why it feels as if the song gains its soul the very moment Acchan sings it. At that moment, I’d get that sense of “…… Ohh!”

―― I’ve got a weird question, but, have you ever thought, “What an awesome band I’m in”?

Y: Mn!   That’s…… Nope, I respect them, but “awesome” has never crossed my mind.

―― But I think that a tag team like Imai-san and Sakurai-san isn’t something that can be found in just any other band, and there’s really something quite miraculous about it.

Y: Hmm. But we’ve been together since we were in high school, and I was even their junior too (lol). I don’t really think about those things. From then until now, nothing has changed. For example, back in high school, Imai-kun would tell me, “I’ve got this sorta music, I’ve got that sorta record,” and he’d let me listen to indies stuff that could only be procured in Tokyo in those days. I guess you could say that’s something which still goes on even now. It feels as if he’s a~lways telling me, “I’ve got something good.”

―― And that’s something which still interests Yuta-san even now.

Y: That’s right. And I’d be like, “Whoa, that’s amazing!” That’s why things haven’t really changed between then and now.

―― Though, now, I can’t quite imagine what Imai-san was like in his high school days.

Y: He was someone who didn’t talk much. Although, I guess all of us are the same in terms of not talking much. Hide isn’t the type to be all loud and rowdy anyway, and Acchan is even quieter than either of them.

―― When the five of you came together as a band, did a chemical reaction occur right off the bat?

Y: That’s right. Good vibes. Well, that was after we moved to Tokyo, though. After Acchan became our vocalist, the vibe changed. Ever since then, we’ve been performing with that same vibe, so I guess that’s why I enjoy it.

―― But that feeling that you’re getting better and better, I suppose that’s probably something that everyone feels too.

Y: Yes. Probably. We won’t say it out loud, though. But I think that those who’ve been watching us all this while probably think so too. Our band has definitely become better than we were before, and we want to be even better. Because we have so many people supporting us and coming to our shows, it makes us want to make it even more powerful and have everyone enjoy themselves even more.

―― I get this feeling that the ‘circus’ image is what you’ve firmly settled on in recent years.

Y: Kind of like a show; something that entertains, right? But that’s why it’s not simply about getting the audience into it. I guess as artists, we have a lot of songs and there are many different approaches (we can choose from), but in the end, (the response) we want to hear in the end is, “That was fun.” And also, things like, “That got me thinking.” I can’t really express it well in words, though.

―― Because it’s not just about entertainment that brings a smile, right? In the end, you want everyone to truly enjoy this world (of yours).

Y: Exactly. After all, we five members definitely have this desire to entertain.

 

If I was asked, ‘how far can you go?’ some decades ago, I’d be able to respond with ‘forever’ but
The older we get, the more it makes us think about things…… But I’d like to keep doing this for as long as I can

―― And among everyone, the one who smiles the most during shows is Yuta-san.

Y: That’s right. Because I think that if you feel great during the performance, you should feel free to smile. I think everyone naturally shows what they personally feel. Of course, I can’t laugh frivolously when it’s a surreal tune, though (lol). That’ll just make me a nuisance, so I’ll try to interpret it in my own way.

―― I think Yuta-san who has a wide range of connections across various genres and has done a serialised publication in support of Hanshin** has been actively doing things that are uncharacteristic of BUCK-TICK’s image.

Y: No, no, I’m actively being asked to do all of this (lol). Editor-in-chief Kanemitsu*** is making me do this. Although, I’m also (thinking, I’ll do it) to at least represent BUCK-TICK.

―― “At least”, you say (lol). But BUCK-TICK is completely detached, and you don’t have any obvious followers too. That’s why I feel this makes Yuta-san’s existence a cheerful window (into the band).

Y: Ahh~. If you say that, you’re (heaping) responsibility (onto me).

―― It’ll be fine since you have this smile of yours. It looks contrived anyway if everyone (in the band) has the kind of face that makes it feel you’re all in the demon world.

Y: Ahh, well, we had made those faces when we debuted. Glaring as if saying, “No laughing at us, don’t take us lightly!” But I think as we went along, we began to find our own style that is unique to us.

―― When did that start to change?

Y: Probably just a little bit before 2000. It just gradually changed within us. Maybe it was around the time of “ONE LIFE~”, just as we entered our Ariola (era). It’s not as if there was any particular event which made us change, but we got the sense that we can do what we want to do. That we should have more fun doing this.

―― Would you say that things became easier?

Y: Probably. Rather than easier, you could say we began to feel that we can express (what we want to) without creating (that sort of impression). Although, we don’t really do that much anymore anyway.

―― That’s true. When I think of the past, I get this image that makes it seem like no one (in the band) eats or uses the bathroom at all.

Y: …… If we don’t eat, we’ll die (lol).

―― At the very least, I couldn’t imagine you living a normal life at all.

Y: Ahh, we’re normal, though, right? Well, if you compare (us) with normal bands, there are those who (make their hair stand up) like this too, and there are also those who are always silent (lol). But I think that’s simply because a lot of us are shy and quiet people.

―― But can shy and quiet people endure on that stage?

Y: Mm, it feels like a switch gets turned on and I think this goes for us too, though. Although, it’s not as if we’d be in the wings going, “Let’s do this!” or, “Yeay!” and all that.

―― Hahaha. If you did, that’d be scary.

Y: We’re relaxed, though. But the moment we go up on stage, everyone suddenly snaps into gear with a “Bang!” I think that’s how it is for all 5 of us. Because this has already become the norm for us.

―― And you’ve been doing this for more than 30 years. It’s stunning.

Y: Mm… But you could say our 30th anniversary was more like a checkpoint. Like, it’s something that we’ll definitely get to as long as we keep at it. That’s why we’ve been thinking about what’s next and what comes after that since the year of our 30th anniversary. It’s quite common, isn’t it? Situations where a band’s members’ emotions which hit a climax on their anniversary and then start to wane after that, ending up with them doing nothing.

―― The typical anniversary waning (lol).

Y: Exactly. I’m also trying to avoid that personally. Which is why we did Locus Solus and also held the DAY IN QUESTION tour last year, and I thought that it was great that we didn’t slacken off. It’s like the feeling that if we keep this up, we’ll be able to carry these feelings over into the new year.

―― Although…… You only released one single in 2019, didn’t you?

Y: Oh, that’s right. It’s true. That’s why I’m thinking that in 2020, I want to first make our album something great and then go all around Japan to where fans are waiting for us. We didn’t do that many shows last year anyway. And besides, I believe it’s such a joy (for fans) when the band comes to the city where you live, isn’t it?

―― How’s the current stage of production?

Y: We’re at the stage where… our manager is asking us to please save up songs for the album.

―― Hahahaha.

Y: Imai-kun says things like, “They’re always on my mind.” Although, we always ask, “Where?” Like, are they in his Mac, or are they not in there yet…… I’ve no clue about that (lol).

―― I’ll be looking forward to your summer album. Also, I assume this is something that you’d have been asked numerous times in recent years, but do you think about how long you can do this and how far you can go?

Y: I don’t know, though. …… But if I was asked something like this some decades ago I’d be able to respond with ‘forever’, but you know, the older we get, the more it makes us think about things, so although I want to say forever, I also know that it’ll all end if (I) die after all. But I’d like to keep doing this for as long as I can.

―― Is it scary to think about the end?

Y: Mm, well, it’s almost as good as asking, “Are you afraid of death?”, isn’t it? But (if we’re afraid of the end), the band might end up becoming strained and all that, you know. Yet, like I said earlier, I know there’s still more to come going forward, so as long as I still feel like that, I want to keep going on.

―― Do you have an ideal ending?

Y: Ideal?   ……… Uh…… I guess, it’s to end without disbanding.

―― Disband…… Are you going to do that now?!

Y: It gets people thinking, “…… What?” Doesn’t it? (Lol).

―― More like, “What the hell are you saying?”

Y: Or rather, “Huh, why make such an announcement when you could’ve just kept quiet?” For sure (lol).

 

 

Notes:

* PAL Music Studio in Koenji, Shinjuku.
Source: https://duck-walk.blog.ss-blog.jp/2008-09-15
image

** Hanshin Tigers; baseball team. 

*** The interviewer.

 

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Yagami Toll

Interview by: Kanemitsu Hirofumi

No matter what type of song we play, it’s always being described as uniquely a BUCK-TICK song
But this is because of the honest work that the band members have put in throughout the years without growing conceited

―― The year-end THE DAY IN QUESTION has concluded. How was it, holding your final at Yoyogi National Stadium First Gymnasium for the first time?

T: Shall I make this clear?   It was the first time in a while that I messed up so much. Even I was shocked. Like, “Whoa!   I’m so tense!”

―― Was that because it was your first time performing there?

T: Yeah. That venue was a first for us, and the pressure from the audience was incredible too.

―― Because the ones right at the back were pretty far away from the stage, weren’t they?

T: I’d guess it was difficult for them to see us too. The acoustics too, it’s pretty tough (to get right) since (the venue) was long sideways. But the condition of Acchan’s voice sounded great, didn’t it? I could tell with the in-ear monitors on. It’s the usual balance, but when he started singing, he could push his voice pretty low. In fact, when he did that, I thought, “Oh, he’s doing well”.

―― What concept did you have in mind when you were selecting the songs for the setlist?

T: This time, for me, I picked Aku no Hana and Jonathan Jet-Coaster. I figured we should play those kinds of fast-tempo songs while I still can (lol).

―― As a drummer, you mean?

T: Yeah. We put them into the setlist and I’ll practice to confirm that I can still perform them. When you watch old footage of songs like Aku no Hana, I didn’t use click tracks for any of the songs back then so the tempo was fast.

―― Now you’d use click tracks no matter the song, right?

T: The only exception would be Speed. Because it seems as if Imai would get uncomfortable if I drum that song too proper. For Aku no Hana’s final outro too, if I drum according to the click track, we’d go out of sync. That’s why I’d listen to Imai’s guitar and drum just for that last part. The nuances from those days have been ingrained into both of our bodies.

―― I see. But that was a great live show.

T: It was, wasn’t it? Despite my messing up (lol).

―― You seemed to be the liveliest one at the after-party too (lol).

T: I don’t really remember it, though. It appeared that we drank until 10 a.m. (lol). I get an adrenaline rush from performing live, so when it’s over and it’s all been released, I’d look like an idiot. And besides, since it’s the year-end, there’s an added sense of closure too (lol).

―― So how was the year 2019 for you?

T: There weren’t many live shows, but I’ve more or less practised consistently. I had my own solo activities too, and we started recording after September, so I didn’t really have time to waste. That in itself was good.

―― For drummers, you won’t be able to play well unless you drum every day, right?

T: Yeah. I mentioned this before in my autobiography too, but in the past, there was a period of time when the band was being suspended and we had no activities. Plus I couldn’t go out because there were tons of paparazzi so I didn’t get to drum for about half a year and (my drumming ability) ended up declining badly. A small percentage of geniuses may be fine even if they didn’t drum every day, but for someone like me, an average drummer, I have to work hard to make sure that this doesn’t happen. I’d ask for advice too. Kamiryou-kun (Kamiryou Wataru*) taught me some and that’s when I changed my drumming style to this present one.

―― Considering that you’re the senior bowing your head to a junior to ask for direction, doesn’t pride get in the way?

T: Not at all. Because to ask may be a moment’s shame, but not to ask and to remain ignorant is an everlasting shame. There’s also Bunta from TOTALFAT who’s about 30 years my junior but he bangs out ninelets without a problem, so I asked him to teach me with the V-Drums I have at home. I just stared and watched his drumming form (lol). Basically, if I’d like to take it in if I can absorb it.

―― That kind of effort is crucial, isn’t it?

T: That’s how it is for us all in this band. Although there are aliens like Imai too (lol).

―― Hahahaha. Well, then what did you think of your new song, Datenshi when you first heard it?

T: When I heard the initial demo, I thought that it sounded very Western. With the simple beat. But while listening to it, it felt as if there was something weird about it.

―― Because the bass was put in areas where it normally wouldn’t be, and at times it’d be removed.

T: I thought that approach was interesting. Although such a hollow feeling could turn out badly if there wasn’t a good (music) sense behind it, Imai can do it just fine, so it’s alright. Once again, this round’s demo for Datenshi made me think, “This guy definitely ain’t no regular person.” The music may sound empty but impactful phrases will hit you.

―― And that beat is very fresh, isn’t it?

T: For me, as a drummer, it was great. Luna Park was actually more difficult. It’s subtle, so I had to use a snare which was made in 1910. And made of real leather too.

―― A vintage you own.

T: In the past, I used it for Tight Rope and I broke it on the first hit. Since it’s made of real leather, it doesn’t last too long before it breaks. So I had to drum gingerly, very carefully (lol).

―― Did you get the impression that Imai-san was doing something new with Datenshi?

T: Rather than that, Imai’s demo sounded like a Western song in the first place so I couldn’t really tell (lol). (It was only after) Acchan sang, then I got the sense of, “So that’s how it goes. It got better.”

―― I see.

T: There’s a good balance. We even recorded 3 songs this time though; Datenshi, another nice mid-tempo song, and Luna Park. So it’s good because we have Hide’s songs too. Age-wise he’s younger (than Imai), so there were no clashes nor any obstinacy (with regards to switching his song for Imai’s Datenshi). I do wonder if things would be different if Hide and Imai were classmates, though. But (based on) his character, he isn’t the type to be driven by ego anyway.

―― That’s true. I guess you could say that he’s suited to writing songs for the band.

T: You see, no matter what type of song we play, it’s always being described as uniquely a BUCK-TICK song, but this is because of the honest work that the band members have put in throughout the years without growing conceited. If not for that, I don’t believe we could have found ourselves here.

―― What does Yagami-san personally think is the reason that you have been able to keep going without growing conceited?

T: Because those around us don’t let us (lol). If we get cocky** we’d get smacked.

―― So, if you stick your nose up too high, they’ll break it*** (lol).

T: I think there was a time when I was on the verge of becoming like that, though. But when I was in my slump, I could feel the members’ feelings and how they put up with me and supported me, so after that experience, there was no way I could become conceited. In my case, there was a period when a lot of things were going on in my private life and that dealt a huge blow to me mentally. It wasn’t that I was lacking in physical strength or anything, but I was mentally worthless. I think it must’ve been really tough for all those who stuck by me during those times.

―― In other words, you were unable to have a positive outlook about the band.

T: Yeah, I couldn’t. I had no motivation, I wasn’t at all happy with the way I drummed, and I even felt that it might be better if I wasn’t a part of the band. For real, from my early to mid-40s, I was afraid of being on stage. I was really terrified.

―― So this was around the time of Mona Lisa OVERDRIVE?

T: Exactly. It was awful back then. I kept thinking maybe it was time for me to quit, that it was a good time for me to go. Our manager and Yuta kept nagging (lol) at me for that, so I started going to the gym, changed my form, changed my drum sticks too. I tried out all sorts of things. Whatever I could easily do in my 20s and 30s I could no longer after I turned 40. It even got me feeling that maybe bad years^ really do exist (lol).

―― But you were able to shake it off and reset your emotions.

T: Yeah. The members waited for me with the feeling that (the band) can’t do it unless it’s me, so those bitter thoughts gradually went away. I guess it’s the same with age. As in, since we’re nearing the end, there’s no point in grumbling about the trivial things (lol).

 

I’m turning 58 this year, so every single moment, be it our live shows or our recording sessions, becomes precious
I’d only think about what I have to do to keep playing in the band, what should I do to bring joy

―― Come to think of it, I noticed that your drum solo, too, has gradually changed.

T: That’s right. I believe anyone can tell if they look back on our film releases or something, but in the past, I wouldn’t hit the cymbals with my bare hands. Because, you see, I felt that it’s tacky if I were to do exactly what John Bonham (Led Zeppelin) did. In a sort of not-daring-to-do-it-because-I-like-it sense. But I thought about it, and I came to feel that since I was influenced by him, it’s probably better to show (that influence). Like, if I was the audience, I think I would prefer to see me do it as it is instead of accommodating to my strange particularities. And that’s why I do it with this present style that I have. Besides, it’s probably weird for me to close things off without showing (that influence) at all.

―― Similarly, I’m also getting the feeling that all 5 members of your band can sense somewhere that the end is nigh and when everyone performs with that awareness, your bond grows stronger, doesn’t it?

T: That’s bound to happen when we grow old (lol). My father passed away at the age of 70 and taking that into consideration, I’m turning 58 this year, so that means that I’ve only got 12 years left. When I count backwards like this, every single moment, be it our live shows or our recording sessions, becomes precious. And rather than fretting about the details, I’d only think about what I have to do to keep playing in the band, what should I show (our audience), what should I do to bring joy.

―― Although Sakurai-san had a slightly different view of it, he spoke about something similar with regards to age, didn’t it?

T: I think everyone thinks the same, but I think if any one of us can no longer perform, this band can’t go on anymore.

―― So, more like Led Zeppelin after all than the Who.

T:  Because BUCK-TICK isn’t a business, is it? (Lol). Although, I think something similar to Zeppelin’s Coda^^, a release which sort of says, “Everyone, this is goodbye,” can be done even if any one of us isn’t around.

―― I see.

T: Because in rock bands, it’s not a matter of whether you’re good or not at singing or playing an instrument, is it? I say this a lot, but we’re the ultimate amateurs, you see. And this nuance of ours can’t be brought out any more if we’re missing even just one of our members. Look, there’s no other guitar player like Imai anywhere else, is there?

―― I don’t suppose so (lol).

T: They say this about him often, don’t they? Even though Imai actually belongs in the “poor” category of guitar players, don’t you wonder why people call him a genius? It’s because he’s one of a kind. It’s because he has a uniqueness that cannot be replicated by anyone.

―― Because this is the only place where that uniqueness comes into play.

T: There are loads of people who can play in time with the metronome properly. But (he’s the one who goes), timing? What’s that? (Lol). And that’s BUCK-TICK’s groove. I mentioned it earlier, didn’t I?   That nuance in Speed and Aku no Hana isn’t something that can be produced if it isn’t Imai and these band members playing it. This is something that I’ve only understood now. I’m glad I didn’t quit (lol).

―― Please say this to all the distressed band members (lol).

T: You’re prohibited against quitting your band! (Lol). Anyway, the punk genre has always been a gathering of people who aren’t good at anything from the very beginning. So if you keep at it, that’ll become your unique characteristic!

―― Compelling (lol).

T: It doesn’t only apply to bands, but to everything too, right? Theory is boring anyway.

―― Well, these days, the main platform (for music) to be listened to is YouTube or some sort of subscription service, so the theory is that you won’t be able to sell well unless your intro before the song is short and you cut out the guitar solo.

T: Even if that were true, it then begs the question of, “You may sell well, but are you having fun doing that?”

―― Indeed.

T: You may call it a gut feeling, but I think that no matter what you’re doing, what matters the most is your motivation, your complex, and who you’re doing it with. Because that’s how it is for us. We wanted to do this with these 5 people even though we were criticised mercilessly when we first debuted. (It also worked out) because the band members waited for me even when I wasn’t sure if I could do it any more. And thanks to that, I learnt humility and didn’t become conceited.

―― That’s true. When I listened to the tribute album, it was clear that (BUCK-TICK is) band unlike any other. Including what you’ve just said.

T: For me, I genuinely want (the participating artists) to take apart (our songs). I’m already grateful for their participation in the first place, but if I were to say what I really desire, it’s for them to destroy it all and turn it into a form of contradictory respect. Because that will become references for us. You see, back in the day, when we did karaoke, we didn’t use recorded playbacks. Instead, we had people playing (the music). Studio musicians would be playing the drums. I’d listen to those nuances and steal from them instead (lol).

―― And that’s humility, isn’t it? Because you won’t deny (their versions) and say that it’s wrong.

T: On the contrary, isn’t it one way to learn and realise that there’s another way to play something too? This is the style that BUCK-TICK’s music production has developed, so I felt that it’d be weird if there’s no quirkiness in this band’s drummer after all.

―― What does Yagami-san want to do in BUCK-TICK in future? Or, what would you like the band to become?

T: I want us to become sharp old men. 

―― Sharp old men (lol).

T: The type who gets noticed by the youngins (lol). I want people to say, “They’re amazing,” even though we’re old men.

―― And for that to happen, health comes first.

T: Come to think of it, I haven’t gone for any health checkup recently (lol).

―― Please go!

T: But I haven’t had any symptoms (of illnesses) at all, see (lol). Look, I’m even drinking until 10 in the morning.

―― That’s not the point.

T: Yeah, yeah (lol).

 

 

Notes:

* Support drummer originally of GRASS VALLEY and then SOFT BALLET. Other notable associated acts he has been involved with are P-MODEL, Kikkawa Koji, cali≠gari.

** The actual phrase is “天狗になったら” (tengu ni nattara). Literally: “If (we) turn into Tengu”. Tengu are long-nosed goblins in Japanese folklore.

*** This time I used a literal translation that references the English language of “sticking one’s nose up in the air”, which is a figure of speech to describe haughty behaviour. The “break(ing)” part of the translation also alludes to the Tengu imagery from the phrase Toll used in the last line. On the whole, the phrase “鼻を折る” (hana wo oru / lit. break a nose) basically means to humble a person’s pride.

^ “厄年” (yakudoshi) loosely translates into “bad/unlucky year”. It is generally known as the ages of calamity differ according to gender; 25 and 42 for men, and 19 and 33 for women.

^^ Coda is a rarities compilation album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin. It is a collection of unused tracks from various sessions during Led Zeppelin’s twelve-year career. It was released in 1982, two years after the group had officially disbanded following the death of drummer John Bonham. The word coda, meaning a passage that ends a musical piece following the main body, was therefore chosen as the title. (Wikipedia)

 

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PARADE III ~RESPECTIVE TRACKS OF BUCK-TICK~

 

TALK SESSION:
Higuchi Yutaka (BUCK-TICK) ✕ TOSHI-LOW (BRAHMAN)

text by Ishii Eriko
photographs by Sasahara Kiyoaki (L MANAGEMENT)

 

For real, all the bands who stand out from the rest
possess the resolution that, “If we’re going to do this, we’ll be number one at it.”
I think that in the end, this is what truly makes a band (Higuchi)

With the utmost respect for the band known as BUCK-TICK, BRAHMAN have fed listeners an intense counterpunch with a cover done their way. Out of this comes a peculiar conversation between TOSHI-LOW, the frontman with the nickname “Oni*” and bassist Yutaka Higuchi. What brings them together despite being completely different in terms of character, generation, and the music scene they grew up in?

 

Although the bassline remained the same, they managed to come up with something so different
This just says that the power this band possesses is very real (Higuchi)

―― Yuta-san’s, “I want to meet TOSHI-LOW-kun,” led to the planning of this interview. Was the first time you met at 2017’s Arabaki**?

Yuta (Y): Yes.

TOSHI-LOW (TL): No…… The actual (first encounter) was about 25 years ago.

Y: Eh?

TL: You know, at Shelter***, when THE POGO’s Ryota had just started JIGHEAD*** in their early days. That was BRAHMAN’s first live show. 

Y: …… Wha――at!

TL: That was the summer of 1995, so it really was BRAHMAN’s very first show. Of course, you weren’t there to see (BRAHMAN), but we were at the afterparty.

Y: ……… Whoa, that gave me goosebumps (lol). Amazing. I remember that. Ryota-kun was there.

TL: JIGHEAD went bass-less a while after that, but back then, the bassist was around, some flashy guy wearing a sun visor. That person going involved with a woman or something and a huge fight started but it was stopped with the casual, “Stop it, stop doing that.” (Lol).

Y: Hahahaha!   But I can clearly recall talking to Ryota-kun. We debuted with POGO in the same period and also performed at Shinjuku Loft and so on together.

TL: I’ve thought since then that (Yuta) was such a nice guy. I think I was someone who didn’t trust anyone at the time so I was very mean to everyone I came into contact with, though. But (Yuta) was suーper nice. Let me say this first; I’m glad (for that).

Y: …… That gave me chills (lol).

―― I’m sure you knew about BUCK-TICK’s existence since your early days.

TL: Of course. Although, their early days’ JUST ONE MORE KISS and Aku no Hana, and Speed was as far as that knowledge went. But that’s because my interests drastically shifted away after that. Though, RONZI (drums) liked them a lot. I always thought that we have no connection with each other and going from that perspective to now having this bring us together makes me nervous. You see, when talk about the tribute album reached me, I even thought, “They definitely made a mistake when choosing artists, right?” (Lol).

Y: Nah, but I run a blog too, and I often receive emails but (upon the release of the news), I had a ton of comments along the lines of, “I’m so happy that BRAHMAN is on board.”

TL: Ah, thank goodness. But on our end, we really had a lot of seesawing back and forth, though. It was first RONZI who decided that our song choice would be ICONOCLASM. “For sure,” he said. But it wasn’t a song I knew so I listened to it again and this song…… This song is a very difficult one to play, isn’t it (lol). We can’t do anything with the arrangement, right? This vibe goes on and on, and that dispassionate detachment is where its appeal lies, so if we mess with that, the song will be destroyed. And to add to that, RONZI said that he didn’t want the bassline to change and MAKOTO (bassist) agreed as well. We tried our best to do this cover while keeping the bassline intact, but it only resulted in our song sounding like a mere copy. So, at that point, I decided to give Yuutan a call.

Y: Heh heh heh heh heh heh.

TL: Yuutan gave me his LINE. I think it was around October of last year. He said something like, “I’m really looking forward to it!” And when I showed (his message) to RONZI, RONZI said, “Oh shit…… We’ll have to rearrange it and do it all over again……”. So, then we started back from square one again. We also figured that if you’re inviting us to take part in this, you’re expecting us to present something that’s been done our way.

―― Ah, so in the beginning, you just read the lines out quietly as they were?

TL: I just read it monotonously, without intonations. I decided to risk doing it with a mechanical sounding voice, but then it all changed from there. I figured that if this was our own song, we wouldn’t be doing it like this, so we tried bringing in more heat into the song. But it was difficult after all. Because only Acchan can produce those vocals, right? And even after we sent our song over, I didn’t receive any reply from Yuutan for the loooongest time. I was freaking out (lol).

Y: No, but it’s not what you think! I already wanted to send my reply upon receiving the sound source, but I thought it might probably be better to do that after the mastering has been properly done. So I just kept resisting the urge (to reply). And once mastering was completed, I immediately sent the message.

TL: And I was just so anxious throughout that period. Like, “Ahh… Did we get the arrangement wrong after all…?!”

Y: No, no, no. To that, all of my band members and I were in total agreement that, “This will definitely be the first track!”

―― It sounds like you ended up experiencing a hit and split rather than getting to quit while you’re ahead (lol).

TL: I was dying here!   Because in fact, we worked harder on this than normal. Also, while we were working on the arrangement, I took the liberty to try and find some common ground (between our bands), but there are contrasts even within the band, aren’t there? For example, the music is pop although it may be dark, and even though it may come across as exclusionary, it’s actually very human. Because such front sides and undersides exist, it made me feel that it would be possible to execute this song with our kind of passion, and that’s what I put my belief in.

Y: Yeah. It was wonderful. Like you said earlier, the bassline remained the same, didn’t it? But despite that, they managed to come up with something so different. This just says that the power this band possesses is very real. Everyone (in BUCK-TICK) remarked that (the cover) was cool too.

TL: …… Thank goodness~.

Y: For real. I think this is the number one (example of what we’re hoping for) when we ask others to do this (with our music). It’s the same for all the bands who stand out from the rest. They all possess this one (resolution) that, “If we’re going to do this, we’ll be number one at it.” And I think that in the end, this is what truly makes a band.

TL: That’s what a band is all about. The music that is created by people who want to do music, those definitely have some sort of format, don’t they?

Y: Yes, yes.

TL: I listened to a lot of past recordings upon this time’s participation, but I found it very intriguing that somehow, what we sought was originality and novelty for ourselves rather than musicality. We’re better described as people who want to play in a band, rather than people who want to dabble in music. And that’s where my affinity (with BUCK-TICK) lies. We, too, don’t (create music) with the intention of writing good or sellable songs but instead, we want to find music that only we, only we 4 (BRAHMAN) can make.

Y: I understand that. There’s 5 of us (in BUCK-TICK), but that feeling of becoming one when all 5 of us come together is so very important. And also, not getting too personal with each other. That’s why I’d also go exploring for song arrangements myself.

TL: But it’s not as if you’re all disparate individuals. I felt that at the Arabaki afterparty too. You’re a band that’s been around for over 30 years, but it’s the after-afterparty and it’s already morning, you know?   But all the band members are there?   It went up little by little but in the end, the only ones left were me and the whole of BUCK-TICK. That was quite the sight (lol).

Y: That was fun. It was the first time in a long while that I was going home by bullet train, and I’m going home drunk too (lol).

 

Being in a band is already the goal and the ultimate form
That is what I can see in BUCK-TICK (TOSHI-LOW)

TL: But everyone (in BUCK-TICK) stayed all the way until morning, and you can see the relationship between the members from that, right?   I’ve always thought that we don’t really have any role models or textbook examples to go by, but I felt that there were things that we could learn from BUCK-TICK. Somehow, it’s as if the band is not a mere means (to an end), but instead, the band itself gives me a very happy feeling, and it makes things super cosy. So I ended up getting so plastered and at the very end I even got to kiss Acchan――.

―― They’re gonna kill you, TOSHI-LOW-kun.

Y: Hahaha. We really had fun drinking.

TL: Well, but Imai Hisashi slept the whoーle time.

Y: These days he falls asleep fast, you know. He’d even fall asleep when we’re eating (lol).

TL: But what I thought was most amazing was when we woke him up and told him we’re leaving, he said, “Already?” with the straightest of faces. He had been sleeping for 2 hours (lol). If we’d known each other a little longer I think I would’ve teased him with an, “Oy!” But everyone ignores it. I thought that was some amazing teamwork. No matter the angle you consider them from, they’re a great band.

―― And that’s not just because of the existence of a drummer, bassist, guitarist(s), and a vocalist, right? This “great band” that TOSHI-LOW-kun speaks of.

TL: Putting it simply, it’s where being in a band on its own is already the goal and the ultimate form. That is what I can see in BUCK-TICK. And even within this, there’s always something they’re pursuing. Their goal isn’t to use music to become rich or famous. I believe that’s why they’re capable of doing something groundbreaking every time and why they aren’t afraid of change. But that said, they’ve always cherished their past and the way things have always been since the beginning. I mean, (your band’s story) starts from your hometown, right?   From your stories in Gunma.

Y: Yeah. Talk about (our days in) Gunma tends to come up in conversation (lol). Since we’ve always been together since way back when, we’d be like, “That guy did this back then,” and, “Nah, that was decades ago.”

TL: The fact that you can still talk about your high school days even now is seriously amazing.

―― Also, in terms of common ground, the starting point (of both bands) is actually punk. BUCK-TICK originally started out as a cover band of THE STALIN^, right?

Y: Yes, that’s right. Imai-kun had (one of) their records. I think it was STOP JAP?   He told me, “This is good stuff,” and I said, “So cool!  A cover^^!” It was just right after I got my hands on a bass, but I figured, well, I can play that with just one finger, right (lol). You know, songs like Tempura (天プラ) and the like. And to that, everyone was like, “Let’s do this!”

TL: I bet Michiro-san was real happy about that.

Y: Michiro-san attended an event of ours’ during our 20th anniversary. And back then, we went on tour together in Kyushu too. We had a lot of fun, and he said he loved ramen, so we decided to go to a ramen stand^^^ to celebrate. And Michiro-san was so happy. In our band, all of us drink alcohol, right? So Michiro-san, he drank with us back then.

TL: I’ve never seen him drink before.

Y: Later on, we asked him, “Michiro-san, you usually don’t drink, though?” But he said, “Just one glass,“ and drank with us.

TL: …… So that’s what brought about his early passing…

Y: Ehhhhhhhhhhh!

TL: Like, you’d wonder, what if he didn’t drink back then (lol). There’s no way it would’ve made a difference, though. But that’s so nice. There’s that punk aura, isn’t there? I’m the one who didn’t go through the positive punk [goth] genre, but doing this cover, I understood that both our bands’ roots were never far from each other’s, to begin with.

 

Even back when you had to stop band activities, all your band members, everyone waited, didn’t they?
I think that this is what friendship is supposed to be
That’s why they’re a role model for these times
(TOSHI-LOW)

―― There’s also another common ground, which doesn’t really mean much, where the bassists of both bands are Hanshin⁰ fans.

TL: Yeah, that’s right. He goes all the time. If there’s a free day while we’re on tour, MAKOTO would definitely go to a Hanshin game. I think you two must’ve definitely passed each other by before.

Y: TOSHI-LOW-kun, you don’t like baseball?

TL: Not at all for me.

Y: But somehow, when Oh⁰⁰ and Nagashima’s⁰⁰ names show up in Oniben¹, don’t they? 

TL: Well, it’s just that I said if I were to make a character bento, I’d want to use aonori¹¹ to make Nagashima’s stubble. And that I’d use the number 3 to form the eyes (lol).

Y: When I read that, I wondered if you were a Giants fan. But I really enjoyed reading Oniben. For me, my father had aーlways made bentos for me. He’s already passed away, though.

TL: If it was back in the day, it’s really rare for a father to prepare bentos for his children, isn’t it?

Y: It might’ve been because Anii didn’t really get bentos made for him much. Maybe he made them for me because he thought that it would be difficult for me, or maybe he felt sorry for me. When I was in elementary school, the lunchroom got closed for construction, so ever since then, he’s been preparing it for me from 4th grade in elementary school until my 3rd year in high school.

TL: What?   Amazing!   Isn’t that obviously because Yuutan was more adorable than Anii?

Y: Eehhhhhhh (lol).

TL: I think from a father’s perspective, the youngest child is the cutest since they’re the smallest of all. But for him to have done that for such a long time, there’s gotta be some sort of love behind it, I’m sure. Otherwise, he wouldn’t do it. Hearing that from you now, it gave me feels. To prepare bentos occasionally is still easy, but doing it every day is really tough. I think your father probably had something in his heart he wanted to convey to Yuutan, and that he decided he would see through this.

Y: Ahh…… But I’ve never thought about what my father could’ve had in mind while preparing that until I read Oniben. Because back then, I thought it was only to be expected. So when I read it, I suddenly realised that my father must’ve been thinking about a bunch while preparing the bentos. But you’re amazing, you know, TOSHI-LOW-kun. BRAHMAN too; you’re all amazing. Your band has been putting out releases one after another, so I can’t really pose as your senior any more.

TL: No, no, no, I had such a great time listening to all your old stories you shared at Arabaki. Like recollections of your early days playing at Loft² and all that, I felt like I could listen to them until morning comes. In terms of era, I’m from the band-boom period, so it may be casual small talk to you all, but to me, all of it is precious. Imai Hisashi, too, he can be one of those opinionated characters now, can’t he? Like the sort to say, “Didn’t I say before that’s off limits!”²² on a gossip talk show. 

―― Hahahahahahaha.

TL: Even back when you had to stop band activities, the fact that you weren’t a band that broke up because of that is wonderful, isn’t it? Of course, I believe it was tough for the members, though. Come to think of it, that was during your first career peak, wasn’t it?

Y: We were really beyond busy at the time. Like, we were constantly in a situation where we would be producing our new album while still going on tour for our previous release.

TL: Wow.

Y: Our heads were already getting all messed up. With our hair put up, there’s no time to even let it down, so we’d sleep on high pillows³ for a little like warriors of the old days and then head straight out right after (lol). That’s why, although that incident wasn’t a good thing, I just think that our band was definitely headed in a bad direction. On the contrary, I guess you could say that making us stop once allowed us to properly shift back to normal.

TL: And all your band members, everyone waited, didn’t they? That’s the strength of a team.

Y: Instead, back then, we were worried, y’know, about Imai-kun. When we met him for the first time (since all of that happened,) he just clapped everyone on our shoulders going, “Mh, mh.” And I think there was even a part of it which turned into a sort of drive (which motivated us to get back up). Because we were in a situation where only our names were out there but we couldn’t appear in any form of media, and our promotional videos and all of that couldn’t be broadcast.

TL: I think that this is what friendship is supposed to be. Of course, things you shouldn’t do, you shouldn’t do, but (the band) didn’t simply cut that person off. Instead, you used (the incident) as a springboard and to move forward together once again. In that sense, BUCK-TICK is a role model for these times, aren’t they? That isn’t how things go at all nowadays. (The offending party) simply gets beaten up and discarded and that’s the end of it. Maybe it’s a sign of the times?   My generation and those a little older than us, I think, definitely have a stronger sense of camaraderie. For better or for worse, there’s some “biker gang” left in us, so we’re people who will never do something like sacrificing one person while everyone else runs away scot-free. I think that’s how it should be even now.

Y: Because we’re all from the Showa era, right? And really, we grew up watching Showa era bands too. We’re of the generation who happened to get to watch Japan’s rock scene getting cooler and cooler. So I think that’s the root of it all for us.

TL: But even with that foundation there, you still keep bringing in new things, don’t you?   If even your foundation changes, then you’d be simply going with the times, but say, for example, if you were to try playing The Stalin’s music with present-day equipment, or if you did it with music programming to see how it would turn out, or something like that, I get this really strong “BUCK-TICK” feeling. That’s why (you make) outlandish music, right? But there are a lot of eccentric parts, and although it’s experimental, it’s also music that is universal.

―― On the other hand, what does BRAHMAN’s music sound like to Yuta-san?

Y: It definitely leaves the impression of heavy rock and punk music. I’ve been invited (to their live show) once. Actor Katsumura (Masanobu) -san asked me to go and watch a BRAHMAN show with him and Sugimoto Tetta-san³³.

TL: Ahh, come, do come.

Y: Actually, I did ask him along too. But I couldn’t go because of work. Even now I feel like I’ve missed out. I definitely want to go to your show next time.

―― To add to that, by all means, please do perform together next time.

TL: For me, anytime. I really want to perform with you together in a band. But…… I guess I might end up showing the fans hell again (wry smile). Because we’ve done that before at Lunatic Fest, y’know.

Y: Did you mess up or something?

TL: Nah, it’s more like the discomfort, on the whole, was overwhelming.

―― Probably because you rudely stepped on the SLAVES⁴ (lol). Now, during BRAHMAN’s shows, TOSHI-LOW-kun leaps into the audience and stands up with his feet set apart on people.

Y: I know, I know. When I saw the pictures and the videos, I thought, “This…… What’s going on here?” Are you standing on their shoulders with that post?

TL: Uh, nope, anywhere will do.

Y: Anywhere (lol). You’re standing in a sea of people, right?

TL: Yeah. I wonder if I could do that and piggyback Acchan. I guess it might work if I can piggyback him.

―― Everyone will be supporting that, with all their might (lol).

TL: Indeed. Both of us are creatures of the underworld, but I’m of a lower rank (lol). Because our statuses are different, you know. An “Oni” is definitely ranked lower than the Demon King, right?

Y: But I most definitely want to perform with you too.

TL: Also, I might be pushing it with this but I’d be glad if you’d come to New Aco⁴⁴ too.

―― Ahh. Have the acoustic BUCK-TICK take part in New Acoustic Camp⁴⁴. That sounds great. I’d like to see that someday.

TL: Their melodies have always been elegant, and they’re really universal and beautiful. So I think their music would really sound great acoustic.

Y: When we previously performed (some songs) acoustically, it was really great. We normally have a variety of synchronicity, but (for that performance) it really felt like all 5 of us was breathing in sync. Also, I could really feel the audience’s breathing too. Yeah, I like that. If there’s any opportunity, I’d like to do that again.

 

Notes:

* I thought of translating “鬼” (oni) into ogre or demon, but I think it works better if I just leave it as “Oni”.

** BUCK-TICK only performed at Arabaki Rock Fest in 2018 so maybe they attended the 2017 one on their own as an audience.

*** Ryota Ogawara is the frontman and guitarist of the mojo punk band JIGHEAD (formed 1995), and before that, rock band THE POGOS (formed 1985, disbanded 1933).
“Shelter” is the shortened name for Shimokitazawa SHELTER (下北沢SHELTER) where JIGHEAD and BRAHMAN played their first live shows.
http://jighead.info/livepast.htm

^ Fronted by the late Michiro Endo, The Stalin were an influential Japanese punk rock band that formed in June 1980 and disbanded in February 1985. BUCK-TICK has previously taken part in a tribute album to The Stalin called Romanticist ~The Stalin/Endo Michiro Tribute Album~ (ロマンチスト〜The Stalin・遠藤ミチロウTribute Album〜). In it, they covered the song Omae No Inu Ni Naru (おまえの犬になる / I Wanna Be Your Dog).
Lyrics and trivia can be found here: http://www.bucktickzone.com/lyrics/uncategorized/omae-no-inu-ni-naru/ 
Listen to the cover here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOZXxjL9Ezo 

^^ Yuta literally said “カバーだ!” (It’s a cover!) so I’ve got no idea exactly what he’s saying beyond this.

^^^ Either something like this or this.

⁰ As in, the baseball team the Hanshin Tigers.

⁰⁰ Sadaharu Oh, also known as Wang Chen-chih, and Shigeo Nagashima are prominent names in Japanese baseball. Both of them played for the Yomiuri Giants. Notably, Oh holds the world lifetime home run record, having hit 868 home runs during his professional

¹ Oniben (鬼弁) is a book of TOSHI-LOW’s bento-making adventures for his eldest son which was released in 2019. Available here.

¹¹ A type of seaweed. Also known as green laver or just dried seaweed.

² The live house, Shinjuku LOFT.

²² The actual statement is, “一回でアウトとか言ってんじゃないよ!”
I honestly have no idea what it could mean but I suppose it’s some kind of common outburst or phrase on those shows.

³ Google “高い枕” for examples. There are other variations but I would assume he’s talking about this.

³³ Also an actor.

⁴ What LUNA SEA fans are called.

⁴⁴ New Acoustic Camp is a sort of not-really music festival which incorporates both the mountains and camping into the events. It is a local Gunma event.
Tokyo Weekender’s posting for the 2019 edition: https://www.tokyoweekender.com/events/new-acoustic-camp-2019-gunma/ 

 

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_______________________

SPECIAL TALK:
ISSAY (Der Zibet)

text by Kanemitsu Hirofumi
photo&design by MISAKI JUN

In Russian

Even among the many artists who participated in PARADE Ⅲ ~ RESPECTIVE TRACKS OF BUCK-TICK ~, Der Zibet’s Ai no Souretsu stands out from the crowd. It is, after all, because this band understands more than anyone else the one core that BUCK-TICK possesses and has tributed this song to them with love. To understand this band is to know the essence of BUCK-TICK.


That feeling of being at a loss, a vast, empty landscape came to mind
And I thought, ‘ah, I know this landscape very well’

―― Sakurai-san said, “Ai no Souretsu suits ISSAY-san better……”, and I also agree that in this tribute album, Der Zibet was the band who made (BUCK-TICK’s song) most like your own.

ISSAY (I): It’s very nice of you to say that. When I was told about the tribute album, I immediately replied with “I’ll do it!”, but it was such a terrible struggle.

―― The song selection?

I: Exactly. When I thought of picking a song, I guess, since they’re a band who has been constantly active for over 30 years, it’s expected that they’ve got a vast variety of options……

―― That’s true (lol).

I: I listened for days, but there were so many good songs that I found myself thinking, “Ah, this one’s good too. But that one’s good too. This is a problem……” so I texted Atsushi-kun (lol).

―― Hahahahahaha.

I: I said, “I’m in a bind.” (Lol). And he replied, “You can do it this way too, and there’s this other way to help you make your choice.”

―― So there’s that kind of advice too!

I: There is, but in the end, I ignored it (lol).

―― Hahahahahaha!

I: First, I decided that I’d stop trying to decide on a song by pinpointing it out. So I selected a few and then discussed with HIKARU (Yoshida Hikaru / Guitar) which from that list would be interesting for us to do as a band. As to how I chose, I picked 2 to 3 songs that I’d like to sing as a part of Der Zibet, and another song that I’d like to sing if I were doing this solo.

―― By the way, what song is it?

I: It’s an absolute secret!

―― Hahahahahahaha!

I: I won’t ever tell Atsushi-kun either (lol). So I sent those songs to HIKARU, and he replied, “I think either one of these two would be good.” And out of those two, the song which grabbed first place was Ai no Souretsu. Actually, I did think that it’d be interesting to do this song with Der Zibet and I did want to try singing it so that’s why I chose it. I suppose what I was thinking of was pretty close to what HIKARU felt.

―― So what exactly were you thinking of?

I: The imagery which Ai no Souretsu has, you know? That isolation and loneliness that is also present in the lyrics. And the romanticism which he possesses. This, I thought, was very similar to our worldview. Also, I think it was 3 years ago? I watched him perform this song at Budokan and it left such a deep impression on me that it’s unforgettable. I was sure that if this was the song we were to do, we would definitely be able to perform it with Der Zibet’s sound without changing the fundamentals of BUCK-TICK’s expression.

―― What did you think of Ai no Souretsu the first time you heard it?

I: I thought it was very Atsushi-kun. That feeling of being at a loss…… A vast, empty landscape comes to mind, doesn’t it? This world view that he has painted, I thought, was extremely close to my own. The way we deal with this feeling of loneliness it brings is probably different, but I feel that I know this landscape very well.

―― What is ISSAY-san’s method of coping with it?

I: Instead of coping, I suppose it’s more accurate to say that in my case, such a landscape basically already exists. And rather than confronting it, I’d just acknowledge that this is something that will always be in me and not do anything about it. It is there as a given.

―― That’s not the case for Sakurai-san?

I: No, I believe it probably exists inside him too. Because (the imagery) wouldn’t have come out like that if it didn’t. However, I feel that the way his heart wavers, or the way it moves when he sees it, that behavioural pattern of his is different than mine.

―― What’s the difference?

I: Atsushi-kun is…… This is simply what I feel, but the first time he lays his eyes on that situation, his heart will be shaken by, for example, surprise and bewilderment. Then he would wonder what this emotional turmoil is about and endlessly pursue (an answer). I think that emotional capacity of his is interesting.

―― I see. So although he feels sad, he’d wonder about the reason behind his sadness or loneliness and get to the bottom of it, right?

I: Exactly. Also, I get the feeling that there’s always a question mark somewhere in his emotional turmoil.

―― A question mark?

I: Yeah. I don’t know if I’m allowed to say this (lol).

―― That’s exactly what we’re looking for (lol).

I: Everyone has their own interpretation, and those aren’t answers, but the question I speak of is not about how things should be, rather, it’s a question mark pertaining to the question of what am “I” when in turmoil.

―― So, it’s about confronting one’s self.

I: I’m the type of person who acts out songs, to begin with, but he sincerely faces (himself) when on stage. There’s a slight difference (between the two of us) there, but since this is a landscape that is very familiar to me, it was easy for me to immerse myself in it.

―― I see.

I: But in these last few years, I can really feel his strength.

―― Strength?

I: I immensely feel the strength that comes from him standing tall and firm on his two feet.

―― How were things in terms of sound production?

I: The final track-down took quite some time, but I think the fundamental areas went relatively smoothly. (We worked on it) while keeping in mind the romanticism and loneliness, and also that isolation which I spoke of earlier, and at the same time, remaining conscious of how much bleaker we can make it sound. Don’t you think that’s where HIKARU’s musical sense came through nicely?

―― That’s true.

I: Don’t you think that if we simply went ahead with taking the same approach to this song, it’ll become nothing more than a simple cover precisely because it’s a song with a world view close to mine? That’s why we went with a tango…… Then again, it’s more like a pseudo-tango, though (lol). Well, HIKARU came up with that idea and suggested, why not take it in that direction. And I was very sold on that, you know. It gives off the sense of an alternate zeitgeist too. I was just allowed to sing freely in that sound (lol).

―― Freely (lol).

I: Yes. I was able to see the scenery very clearly this time, so I decided to sing the lyrics naturally; without a single gratuitous gimmick in the song, nor any weird vibrato (lol). When I was thrown into it, I decided that I’d stand up straight and sing it.

―― Have you heard any response from BUCK-TICK about the song?

I: We spoke about it the other day when we were drinking after Yoyogi. I was pretty drunk (lol) but Atsushi-kun gave me a compliment; he said, “It was great.” At the time, he asked me, “This song…… was it difficult to sing?” (lol). And when I answered, “It was,” he said, “It’s difficult after all, isn’t it, this song?”

―― Hahahahaha.

I: Our lyrical approaches are different, you see. In this song, Atsushi-kun put phrases with symbolic and impactful words in the chorus. I don’t really use that approach, but as a singer working with such lyrics, it’s very difficult. I could feel how amazing he is as a vocalist. So…… I can’t lose! (Lol).

―― But it’s already turned into ISSAY-san’s, or rather, Der Zibet’s song.

I: I’m glad you think so. Since it’s a favourite song of mine, I was even thinking of perhaps singing this song as my own in future live shows. As a vocalist, I’d be very happy if I could, one day, sing this song with Atsushi-kun be it in this arrangement or the original.

―― I would love to hear it. Also, aside from your world views being similar, it’s also filled with love, isn’t it?

I: When involved in a tribute, isn’t it truly frightful if you ended up doing it wrong?   Because we’re essentially different, to begin with. But I think that it’ll turn out to be something really interesting as long as my love for the work and the musician(s) doesn’t go in the wrong direction. We’re not the same person, but it’s important to acknowledge one another, and as a vocalist, I thought a lot about how to put our differences into play.

―― It’s turned out to be a lovely tribute.

I: Because I sang it with all my love for the band BUCK-TICK, and Atsushi-kun (lol).

 

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Contributor Article

A One-Of-A-Kind Polyphony

by Okada Iku

 

Today I surrender to the “polyphony” that melts together into one
I chant the answer without a question, “Only BUCK-TICK is BUCK-TICK”

In 2019, when Ringo Shiina and Sakurai Atsushi performed Elopers on a music show, viewers who saw Sakurai’s performance for the first time screamed in delight on social media one after the other, causing a huge commotion. I, on the other hand, was reminded of the proverb “a borrowed cat¹” when I watched him take a step back for Ringo Shiina in the middle of the song. Because, after all, she did borrow him briefly for that little while.

Elopers is, simply put, very much a BUCK-TICK-styled song. The showy lyricist harmonises with Sakurai Atsushi, no, performs a unison where their voices do not intermingle. It’s an outstanding piece of work that could have been inadvertently inserted right after PINOA ICCHIO -Odoru Atom- as the 3rd track of Atom Miraiha No.9. But such a thing will never happen, because this is, after all, an external collaboration and “not” BUCK-TICK.

But if that’s the case, then what “is” BUCK-TICK on the other hand?   It’s actually surprisingly difficult to define their musicality and answer this question. I find myself laughing at the contradiction that no sooner were they praised as “having remained the same for over 30 years,” than were they described as, “constantly evolving.” Although I have been listening to them for 27 years, even now, I’m always finding fresh surprises whenever I put all their songs on shuffle.

Nevertheless, if you arrange it all properly and trace the changes, there is one major factor that points to linear time and that is the voice of Imai Hisashi. Sakurai and Imai stand side by side and harmonise, no, perform a unison where their voices do not intermingle. Those moments are the instances when my auditory nerves take unparalleled pleasure in acknowledging, “This! This is BUCK-TICK!”

When I first listened to Kurutta Taiyou, I was amazed at Sakurai’s ability to express himself in a variety of different ways, starting with the opening track Speed. More than that, Imai’s “Open it onto Evolution Mode” in the B-side, Brain, Whisper, Head, Hate is noise was even more impressive. Imai Hisashi’s vocals are primitive; it’s a noise that strikes a chord with listeners. He descends suddenly like a deus ex machina, forcibly taking away the gaze that tends to be focused on frontman Sakurai and giving the audience a bird’s eye view of the whole performance. This looks like a monologue, not a solo act. It is not an ensemble of five people, but one Lingua Sounda. This was the “heavenly voice” which opened up the metaperspective to the lost lambs and allowed them to decipher the entirety of the band’s sound.

Also, Aikawarazu no “Are” no Katamari ga Nosabaru Hedo no Soko no Fukidamari and Sid Vicious ON THE BEACH, where Imai performs as the main vocalist, are “foreign bodies” which were cleverly mixed in to prevent the balance and harmony of their respective albums from being boring. On the other hand, listening to Deep Slow, Madman Blues ~Minashigo no Yuu’utsu~, Living on the Net, and other songs of the like now leave the strong impression that they are masterpieces of “the lead actor of the BUCK-TICK theatre Sakurai Atsushi who has an intimate knowledge playwright Imai Hisashi’s direction.” Songs of Sakurai’s vocals give off the sense that if times were different, this might’ve been a stage performance with Imai as the main star.

The chorus work and banter in MY FUCKIN’ VALENTINE, Cyborg Dolly: Sora-Mimi: PHANTOM, 21st Cherry Boy, LADY SKELETON, and, of course, Memento mori also get the crowd excited at their live shows. A similar, but not identical, approach was taken in BUSTER and Les Enfants Terribles, where the same tunes are being repeated by different voices. With Sakurai going before and Imai going after, it is impossible to perform these songs without one or the other. Or, perhaps, they are a two-headed beast that rears its sickle-neck. From this point, the playwright gets in as a cameo in the signatory actor’s solo performance, establishing it as a fabulous two-man show.

During the interlude of Alice in Wonder Underground, Imai’s voice continues to sing DIABOLO -Lucifer- from their previous work 13th Kai wa Gekkou. In Tenshi wa Dare da, the same words which were previously sung by Imai are again pursued by Sakurai with a different melody. As we move onto the days of Tango Swanka, it’s no longer a simple relationship of Sakurai being the main star and Imai being the guest. And by the time we lead up to DADA DISCO -GJTHBKHTD-, the whole song is composed of dialogue between Imai and Sakurai. It is as extravagant as breaking two perfect, beautiful bowls into pieces on purpose and then putting them together once again by kintsugi². Surely the line in Elopers which reads “pH stays at seven as we bind each other up” is a homage to this?   Ringo may not have said anything in relation to this, but I understand how Ringo feels. Because, I, too, love this.

Like a large flower blooming open from a bud, the presence of the polyphony of the BUCK-TICK theatre is only growing. Most noteworthy in their latest album, No.0, was the flow from Nostalgia -Vita Mechanicalis- to IGNITER. From “Open it onto Evolution Mode”, these double vocals have grown and built up over the years, overlapping to a point where rather than no longer getting surprised when they come up in various tracks, we are bathed in an amalgamation of sounds that makes it impossible to even tell where the five-man band is coming from.

In 1993, I watched Dress at some point which led me to check out all the old scores from the local ward library. As a 13-year-old who grew up with YMO as a lullaby but still couldn’t quite find music which hits the spot even after listening to any number of great rock albums, I was immediately hooked on them. The very first thing which moved my heart was, above all, the beauty of the melody woven by Hoshino Hidehiko, then, thanks to the “danceable” groove which Yagami Toll and Higuchi Yutaka created under the skin of a rock band, I can still listen to them without getting tired of them. And finally, my desire to spend the rest of my life watching the one who always craves for the “next one” to death no matter how satisfied he is with their new work; Imai Hisashi and Sakurai Atsushi side by side with each other.

Still, it’s a little late to be wondering what kind of planetary alignment occurred to draw me towards Hoshino’s aria, to peek into this band where Sakurai’s aesthetics coexist with Imai’s noises and the rhythm brothers Higuchi and Yagami. Where the scales and rhythms and festivities of all world music on earth are incorporated in an unadulterated and elaborate manner, primitive yet mechanical, letting you stand and headbang and shake your head side to side, and feel the groove moving you, swaying your hips as you dance with alternating steps. It’s hard to describe its musicality in one word. But today I surrender to the “polyphony” that melts together into one, and I chant the answer without a question, “Only BUCK-TICK is BUCK-TICK”.

 

Okada Iku●
Writer. Born in Tokyo and lives in New York. After working for a publishing company, she began penning essays. Author of Haji no Oi Jinsei, Yome e Iku Tsumori Jyanakatta, Tengoku Meshi to Jigoku Mimi, 40-sai Made ni Kore wo Yameru, and co-author with Nimura Hitoshi and Kaneda Junko for Otoko no Karada wa Kimochi Ii.

 

Notes:

Lyric translations come from This is NOT Greatest Site.

¹ 借りてきた猫 (karite kita neko) literally means a borrowed cat. It refers to a person-for-hire, or a person who appears meek and quiet, as if like a reserved cat in an unfamiliar environment.

² Kintsugi, also known as kintsukuroi, is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery by mending the areas of breakage with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver, or platinum.

 

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Translation: Yoshiyuki
Scans: spanielonthemoon on Tumblr