The ornaments are incendiary*.
── Sakurai Atsushi Mesmerises!

GQ JAPAN
September 2021

Photos 奥脇孝典 Takanori Okuwaki@UM
Styling 清水ケンイチ Kenichi Shimizu
Hair&Make-up 山路千尋 Chihiro Yamaji@Fats Berry

 

Having turned 55 this year, Sakurai Atsushi who made his major debut in 1987 as the vocalist of BUCK-TICK is a forerunner of the rock scene even now. This rock legend who “have always been fascinated by the New Romantic movement” charms us bewitchingly, clad in his latest look.

 

 

 

Coat ¥649,000 | Sweater ¥209,000 | Pants ¥132,000 (All from TOM FORD), Sunglasses ¥55,000
〈TOM FORD EYEWEAR /All the above are from Tom Ford Japan〉
Necklace ¥242,000 | Bangle  ¥1,320,000 | Ring ¥286,000 〈All from TIFFANY & CO.〉

“The architectural tailoring is reminiscent of British brands, and the way it fits the body was really cool. I also liked the combination of the metal buttons and gold jewellery.”

Music rejuvenates me

A glossy shirt and slim-cut jeans, along with a pair of heeled boots. Sakurai-san showed up at the studio in an all-black ensemble. The moment he came in, he introduced himself with, “I’m Sakurai from BUCK-TICK.” There were, however, no mannerisms suggestive of the impetuous performances he puts on stage. He was mild-mannered and his tone, courteous. “It’s been a while since I last did a fashion photoshoot, but I had fun,” he said.

“My fashion is really, simply, black. I feel at ease when I wear black, and somehow I look sharper as well, so part of it is that it’s easy for me, and like putting on armour, when I wear black and slip on my boots, I’d naturally get into the zone.”

The hallmarks of BUCK-TICK when they debuted were heavy makeup and flamboyant outfits. But where did that come from?

“We’ve been influenced by 80s punk and New Romantic music, artists like David Bowie and Sex Pistols, Culture Club and all that since we started out as an amateur band, so we learned and imitated them with the makeup and the music. Putting on makeup gets me into the zone before we go on stage and perform in front of everyone. That stretch of time gives me such a sense of fulfillment. Back then, we’d be told that men aren’t supposed to wear makeup, but now, we’re at a time when there’s no need to decide that “men have to be this way”, everyone is free [to be as they please]. I think this trend of enjoying your own life is something good.”

Last year marked the 35th anniversary of the band’s formation. Still rocking at 55 years of age, the one thing that keeps Sakurai-san’s unchanging style alive is music.

“I drink and there are times when I neglect my health, but music is what rejuvenates me. Music is the only secret behind my energy cycle (lol). Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, I’ve come to think of the day-to-day life that I’ve led up until now as a miracle, so all I hope is to perform as many concerts as I can, and to keep making music for as long as it is possible.”

 

Jacket ¥583,000 | Pullover  ¥117,700 | Pants ¥506,000 | Three-strand necklace (Top) ¥162,800 | Necklace (Middle) ¥138,600 | Necklace (Bottom) ¥113,300 | Belt ¥244,200 | Bracelet ¥73,700 | Ring (Right hand) ¥24,200 each (est. price) | Ring (Left hand) ¥40,700 〈All from DOLCE & GABBANA〉

“The glitter from the embellishments and accessories designed into the set-up brought about a positive feeling and made it an enjoyable look to shoot.”

 

Coat ¥512,600 | Shirt ¥57,200 | Pants ¥171,600 | Stole ¥36,300 〈All from YOHJI YAMAMOTO〉

“I actually became a fan of Yohji in my 30s and there was a period of time when I bought the pieces for my own collection. It’s been a while since I’ve worn [clothes from Yohji Yamamoto] but it’s impressive to see that there is this consistent attitude in the craftsmanship that hasn’t changed since that time. I occasionally visit the Aoyama store, so it’d be cool if I get to bump into Yohji-san one day.”

 

Jacket ¥517,000 | Shirt ¥330,000 〈Both from GIORGIO ARMANI〉
Necklace with brooch ¥4,730,000 〈MIKIMOTO〉

“Matching Armani’s signature velvet texture with pearls creates an air of nobility, doesn’t it? This is the first time I’ve worn pearls but it’s got an elegance and an aura of tranquility, I think they can be used on a variety of occasions.”

 

 

PROFILE
Sakurai Atsushi

Born 1966 in Fukuoka City, Gunma Prefecture. Made his major debut as a member of BUCK-TICK in 1987. The band has remained active ever since with no change in member line-up. Legends in Japan’s rock scene, they celebrated their 35th year together in 2020 and continue to be an influence of many artists’ to this day. Their latest single, Go-Go B-T TRAIN is set to be released on September 22 while their live Blu-ray & DVD, TOUR 2020 ABRACADABRA ON SCREEN/ABRACADABRA LIVE ON THE NET is now available. Their national tour, TOUR2021 Go-Go B-T TRAIN will kick off on October 3.

 

 

 

Notes:

* This was a challenge. The title was 装飾がバクチクする (soushoku ga bakuchiku suru). You’d probably recognise バクチクする as the phrase that was often used as a naming pun for BUCK-TICK. It was translated as “explosive”, “crackling”, “fire cracker” (this doesn’t work as a verb) but in this case I chose “incendiary” because the whole piece wasn’t exactly as… bombastic as the other words might imply. The clothing prices though…

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Source: GQ JAPAN

BUCK-TICK — Uta/Kimi e Review

Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll
April 1995

Text by Onojima Dai

 

BUCK-TICK will be releasing their new single Uta/Kimi e on March 24. What is this sound that broke their long silence like?

BUCK-TICK announced their new single, Uta/Kimi e. How many years has it been since we had a new record from them? Apart from Yuta’s serialised column in this publication, we’re barely heard any news of BUCK-TICK’s movements during their break. It’s also been a really long while since I’ve met or even spoken to the band members too, so I could listen [to this single] with a fresh mind.

Uta was composed by Imai Hisashi, and Kimi e, by Hoshino Hidehiko. The lyrics of both songs were written by Sakurai Atsushi.

Whichever song you listen to, the first thing you’d notice is the introduction of distortion-filled heavy metal-like rock guitars. And they weren’t effectively used in specific parts of the songs. Instead, they shaped the character of the songs by reverberating throughout pretty much the whole track. Based on the general impressions I’ve got, I’m sure that even though Imai and Hoshino’s guitars can be noisy and make strange sounds you wouldn’t hear anywhere else, I don’t think they have ever pushed such an orthodox and undoubtedly rock-styled distortion sound to the forefront before.

As a result, the subtle delicateness and exquisite shades that had always been present in BUCK-TICK’s music until now has disappeared and turned into a strong, heavy rock tune that slams into you.

On the other hand, the world of Sakurai Atsushi’s lyrics and his vocals largely maintains the image that he’s created so far. Of falling endlessly while desperately reaching your hands out in search of light in a world where hope and despair are in conflict. This in itself is an approach towards a perfected universe.

But, a problem lies in the sound balance.

I’ve listened to it close to 10 times since I received the tape, but somehow, I just couldn’t shake this feeling that something felt off. Before, I’d always feel like I’d made a new discovery or like my heart had suddenly been pierced with a delicate touch whenever I listened to a new BUCK-TICK song, but this time, there was none of that.

The singing and the playing are disparate. Or, well, maybe making them disparate is just one honest way of expressing it, but rather than going in the direction of each part complementing and playing up the other, I ended up getting the impression that these two parts were killing off each other’s positive aspects.

And the most uncomfortable part of it all was the beat. I can’t feel any groove at all. The rhythm is precise but there’s no nuance or timing that is strong enough to lead the whole song along so no matter how eager they are to try to distort the guitars, it doesn’t have the slightest bit of rock ‘n’ roll intensity. Why on earth did Anii drum such a flat rhythm when he’s supposed to be a fan of the role model of rock ‘n’ roll dynamism and nuance John Bonham (Led Zeppelin).

But I thought of something when I heard this longitudinal rhythm. Maybe the composer had in mind industrial sounds representative of Ministry or Nine Inch Nails. Rather then subtle nuances and sensibilities, the industrial machine beats that seem to barge through thick and heavy are like a sort of hardcore punk with a spasmic beat, kind of like a pulse without the groove and undulations. That, in its own way, is powerful and cool but I don’t think that this beat that BUCK-TICK brought this time is anything that meticulous. Somehow, everything is half-baked. In short, I suppose it doesn’t match their nature.

But, well, I guess it’s fine too. More than anything, the thing that disappointed me the most when I listened to this single was that I could barely sense any BUCK-TICK-ness or anything that is specifically unique to BUCK-TICK and only BUCK-TICK. The one most conventionally BUCK-TICK-like thing in this whole single was probably, Sakurai’s singing. As a vocalist, he is by no means perfect one. While delicate, Sakurai’s voice, which is neither robust nor that of a heavy rock vocalist’s, keeps getting muscled out by the loud and forceful background music. His subtle nuances and thoughtful wordings gets blasted away, leaving only a brutal impression like that of a rough, grainy photograph.

And their sound. They probably have a few creative ideas of their own, but unfortunately, barely any of their original ideas or that ingenuity can be detected in the BUCK-TICK sound in this single. Whichever song you look at, it just seems to me that they are taking overused formulae from Western rock music of 4 to 5 years ago that have been reused for years, only to recycle it again now.

I rated Shapeless, an album of BUCK-TICK’s songs remixed by Western techno artists highly. Of course, the remixing is the work of the remixers and have nothing to do with BUCK-TICK themselves. But even though they had the opportunity to see what different possibilities their music has with the help of these top Western artists, they instead chose to go against the times and step backwards, going industrial. This is just too much of a waste. I’m not saying that BUCK-TICK should make techno music. I don’t think it’s too much to ask of them to apply the spirit and new direction shown in techno, the music of this era. At the very least, isn’t this a more correct solution for them as compared to forcing themselves down the heavy rocker route if they considered their own nature as musicians? Well, having said all that, “No, I only did it ‘cause I wanted to,” is what I can already see Imai saying though……

RR97 Coverage Report:
Sakurai Atsushi/BUCK-TICK

ROCK AND READ Blog
07 September 2021

The next issue of “ROCK AND READ 097” (sale on 24 September) is a special issue of BUCK-TICK who are releasing their new single, Go-Go B-T TRAIN on 22 September.

BUCK-TICK will finally be dropping new music one year after their last album ABRACADABRA was released in the middle of the pandemic.

In addition to an interview with Sakurai Atsushi, who wrote the lyrics for all the songs on the single including the new versions, Uta Ver. 2021 (唄 Ver.2021) and JUST ONE MORE KISS Ver. 2021, in this issue, there will also be an interview with Imai Hisashi who composed the title track Go-Go B-T TRAIN, and Hoshino Hidehiko who composed the new B-side, Koi (恋).

There will also be an article discussing the original JUST ONE MORE KISS and Uta, the era they were created in and their impact, plus a report on the conceptual live stream concert Misemono-goya ga Kurete Kara~SHOW AFTER DARK~ (魅世物小屋が暮れてから~SHOW AFTER DARK~) which was broadcast back on July 17.

So, the first part of this 52-page Go-Go B-T Special is a long interview with Sakurai Atsushi, who graces the cover of this issue.

He goes into detail about all the songs recorded on Go-Go B-T TRAIN and talks about what happened in the year following the release of ABRACADABRA. Sakurai’s words in this interview on what “flowers” mean to him is quite a touching moment too, so do look forward to that.

Charging ahead fueled by love, the BT Train driven by BUCK-TICK who chants the “Spell of Love” is on its way!

 

 

 

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Scans: ROCK AND READ BLOG

 

 

Somewhere Nowhere 1995 Live Report

Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll
July 1995

Photography by Inoue Seiichi
Text by Oshibe Keiko

 

At long last, “Six/Niɴe” begins!!
Breaking report!! 2 Days’ Concert at Budokan

The curtains have finally been raised on BUCK-TICK’s tour, Somewhere Nowhere 1995 with their 2 days of opening concerts at Budokan on May 16th and 17th. Their sound becomes ever more experimental with each new release. But even as their staging becomes less appealing to the general masses, the band’s collective power remains unparalleled. Now, we’ll tell you all about what the concert was like, ahead of everyone else in this ultra breaking report that made our printing company cry.

 

 

Their continual search for sonic innovation while maintaining a pop presence is even more poignant

BUCK-TICK’s long-awaited album, Six/Niɴe was released on May 15th. They kicked off their tour, “Somewhere Nowhere 1995” with 2 days of opening concerts at Budokan on May 16th and 17th.

This tour will go on for a period of approximately 2 months, ending with their final 2 days at Osaka Koseinenkin Hall¹ on August 2nd. As this magazine will go on sale when the tour is still in its first leg, I will do my best to refrain from spoiling the setlist in this report.

Two days before the start of the tour, the band played at Shinjuku LIQUIDROOM².

Compared to an auditorium, the ambience of a live house makes it easier to bring out a sense of euphoria and a particular communal sense of unity. And I frankly think that more often than not, the closer you are [to the performers], the more tangibly thoughts and feelings can be conveyed.

However, after watching these two shows, I realised that in the case of BUCK-TICK, it was easier for them to get their message across when there’s a certain amount of distance between them and the audience.

Because their show isn’t the type where the energy gets amplified by getting the audience involved. Instead, I feel that it draws you in with a deliberately constructed overall mood on top of an increasingly unique ambience in terms of sound. Coming too close will contrarily make it difficult for them to convey this ambience, as if in a bid to create some kind of distance.

For example, in a live house, Sakurai’s lines in Somewhere Nowhere or even his screams sound like a script from an avant-garde play with a rawness that left me at a loss as to how to react, but in Budokan, it came across with a poignant effect instead.

If musicians innovated without losing their inquisitive spirit with each new work they put out, just like BUCK-TICK, then oftentimes, the range of audiences they can reach narrows. That is to say in other words, the factors of the greatest common denominator, or their mass appeal, diminishes.

But BUCK-TICK’s audience have always been flexible in accepting whatever they release. I think that is in part a result of giving typically-passive audiences a sense of autonomy through the process of them evolving their sound all while compellingly drawing in listeners. Because of that, even songs like Uta can be classified as pop as long as it is being performed by BUCK-TICK.

Personally, it’s BUCK-TICK’s band power of randomly shifting values that intrigues me.

This new album appears to be an attempt to rebuild using new elements after demolishing a certain level of mastery they had attained in their last. It is exceptionally proper of them as artists to disregard the pursuit of any sort of “likeness” or anything like that amidst the pre-established harmony. This stance along with their consistent ability to draw in an audience makes for a simply gratifying tale.

But how does the audience view this present album? While there is an increased sense of “better conveyed from a distance” in their pursuit of innovation, I also got the feeling that there was diminished connectedness with the audience. Watching the arena from the second floor, I could see that although the audience understood the band’s stance, they yearned for moments when they could somehow connect with the men on stage somewhere.

Like the tune hummed after the Uta’s break, or Sakurai’s short emcee. In those moments when it felt like there was some way to connect with the stage, the audience felt as if they were groping around trying to find it.

The main set comprised only songs from the new album, arranged such that it would bring the singular flow to a close at the end.

Caught up in such a flow, I think the audience felt that it was easiest to eke out those “moments” during the song from Kurutta Taiyou, which the band played in the encore. But that connection was severed all too soon the moment the song ended and the auditorium light up. While there might be those who simply enjoy this set up or who get some sort of masochistic pleasure from this, I’m sure there are also those who were left feeling like there’s unfinished business.

However, this concert was held the day following the release of the album which also means that not everyone was familiar with the music yet.

Taking that into consideration, at this point in time, it is still a mystery as to whether the uncertainty exhibited by the audience was because of that, or due to the confusion around the band’s direction in the new album.

It will be interesting to see what the mood in the various tour venues will be like as [the audience] soaks in the album.

At the same time, it is as Yagami Toll said during his interview for the new album; the band’s principal stance is to disregard their audience and do whatever they want.

How “pop” of an existence will this piquantly self-seeking band who hurtles headlong into going their own way continue to be for their audience from now on? Will their sound evolve as they figure out how to keep up their centripetal force so strong that it transforms their worth?  Looking at the way they’re going recently, I personally feel that there’s a lot we can expect from them in this respect.

 

 

 

Notes:

¹ Now known as Orix Theater.

² First opened in July 1994 before shutting in January 2004. Later that year in July, they moved to Shibuya and reopened.

 

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Scans: Endless Dei (@DeiEndless on Twitter)

 

Related articles:

[Jun 1995] Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll: Six/Niɴe Feature — Double-Edged BUCK-TICK

[Jul 1995]  Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll: Outpouring from the heart — Part 2 of Sakurai Atsushi’s interview in the Six/Niɴe Feature

 

Outpouring from the heart

Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll
July 1995

photography Hitoshi Iwakiri (岩切等)
hair & makeup Takayuki Tanizaki (谷崎隆幸)
styling Tomoharu Yagi (八木智晴)

 

The last issue featured a special segment for BUCK-TICK’s latest album Six/Niɴe, but due to space constraints, we could only publish half of the interview with Atsushi Sakurai, even though he made the effort to share his true feelings with us. And so, this time around, it’s the continuation. Through this interview, I hope you’d uncover the key to the change they displayed in the contentious Six/Niɴe.

 

Read part 1 here

 

 

And so, here is the second half of Atsushi Sakurai’s interview. It’s a continuation from last month’s issue, so please give that a read too.

 

In the end, (music) is just entertainment, isn’t it?
I’m just very happy that I can simply entertain.

 

S (Sakurai): It’s all sorts of things. Like…… Hmm…… Someone who says they like me? For example…… It’s like…… In the end, it’s entertainment, isn’t it? Like, I’m just very happy that I can simply entertain, and things like that.

―― So, even if you’re not doing anything that doesn’t satisfy the world, you’d be happy as long as you can feed yourself.

S: Yes.

―― I suppose that’s for sure. I guess you could also say that it doesn’t matter at all whether everyone here (the artists, the manager, the journalist, the writers, etc.) are here or not.……

S: I wouldn’t go as far as to say that, though (lol). Well, I guess you could say that it’s the first time I felt like this.

―― Feeling grateful for that kind of happiness?

S: That…… what do you call it? You know how people often say, “First of all, I want to thank God,” or something like that when they receive some sort of an award? That sounds textbook, but there are times when you feel like that’s all just a lie. Somehow, the more someone says it, the more fake it sounds.

―― You mentioned someone who said they like you. Do you mean like a girlfriend or something?

S: Could be a girlfriend, or, well, fans or siblings, yeah. Someone important. Well, it could be people you work with, or you date. It’s just the people you’re together with, like, close friends and the like.

―― Hm. But that’s a very big change of heart, isn’t it?

S: That’s true.

―― In the past, you definitely gave off a stronger sense of “I’m alone”, right?

S: Well, that I’m alone, I think that was how I presented myself.

―― How you presented yourself.

S: Like, drawing sympathy [to myself], like begging for it.

―― So, that’s what you called theatrics earlier on, like a false pretense.

S: And all that other…… My apologies to others who are doing similar things, please don’t misunderstand, but if I was begging [for it], then I must be thankful, or rather, I want to be grateful [for what I received]. Or something like that.

―― And that state of mind has influenced your lyrics?

S: I suppose that’s where it seems to have started for me, personally.

―― But considering all those feelings, that actually makes it feel heavy on the whole, doesn’t it?

S: The sound?

―― Sound, lyrics. They certainly don’t have that bright, letting-go feeling.

S: I guess, isn’t that some sort of simplicity? Living and dying, likes and hates.

―― What artists have you been listening to lately?

S: All kinds of things inspire me. Records do, and movies, and manga, and so on. In this album, ISSAY-san (DER ZIBET) participated as a guest vocalist and I got to have a nice chat with him about his approach, the way he works and all that. So, you could say that I was influenced in that manner too. Having read the books and manga that were recommended to me, those he said he liked quite a lot, that also really influenced me significantly. It’s like that with movies too. Just, anything. Like a snatch thief, because I’m hungry [for more]. Even people watching in a place like this (the pub where this interview is being held) can inspire me.

―― And doing this makes you come out of your shell more and more until those false pretenses fade away along with the negative parts of you. So, do you get the desire to try and create something where you’re in complete control of everything just so that you can show 100% of who you are as you gradually revert to being your natural self?

S: That’s plain troublesome.

―― (Lol) That’s the only thing that doesn’t change, is it? For you. Since the beginning.

S: That sort of thing, working the musical instruments, it’s such a pain that I just can’t.

―― But you don’t have to play the instruments. You can just give instructions, right?

S: Mmm…… But I don’t think I can convey [my ideas]. Because I don’t know them. The technical terms. Not one bit. I don’t even know the processing for voice effects and all that. But I want to change that. A bunch of things.

―― Like?

S: Limitations like being required to finish producing an album by a particular date, things like that. Like, promotional strategies. If these things can be changed, I’d like to do it myself. For about a year or so.

―― Album production. Well, certainly it’s probably good if you could spend more on it.

S: We can’t do that.

―― But with BUCK-TICK’s present position, the mixed-media portion of your promotional strategy has grown to comprise quite a large percentage of it, right?

S: Yes.

―― Do you understand those things?

S: Yeah, I do.

―― It makes me wonder if you truly feel that it doesn’t matter whether or not your album sells. Even if you do say that, wouldn’t you still question in the back of your mind whether it’s good or not if it won’t sell?

S: No, I don’t really feel that way. It’s just that, even if it’s unpopular, we won’t have the time [to dwell on it] anyway.

―― I spoke to Imai-kun just now, and he said that it’s ultimately the buyers who judge your releases. So, this can only mean that the indication of their verdict will depend on how well your records sell. That is what was said, but does Sakurai-kun really feel that way?

S: But even if you like a particular song a lot, doesn’t the opinion change from person to person? Even if you’ve made a very good something, it doesn’t necessarily mean that it will be popular. For me, I really love ambient music that doesn’t have singing voices. But even though they make me think, “This is so good!”, it doesn’t sell very well.

―― Ah, that’s about music other than your own, though.

S: You’re talking about my own music? Ahh. I’m not particularly interested in those kinds of things. This’ll probably make me sound like I’m just being cool but the number one thing [for me] is to like what I make. Well, it’s even better if it sells well too. I’d think everyone feels the same way.

―― But frankly speaking, BUCK-TICK does sell. If you’re someone who’s living from hand to mouth, you’d probably have a desperate desire for [your music] to sell. Depending on the person.

S: Right. I suppose so.

―― For a musician, I’d assume that you’d keenly hope that if you release a record, you’d want to sell enough to at least fund your next work, or enough that you don’t have to work extra jobs. So, saying that you’re not concerned [with sales numbers] is.

S: Mm, the privilege of those who do sell well.

―― But there’s also the fact that because you’re someone whose records sell well, you must produce things that you like.

S: I think we’re doing that.

―― Right. Listening to this album, I felt that it’s an album that makes you want to listen to the next one as soon as possible.

S: Ah, really?

―― Somehow, this one gives me the feeling that you’ve yet to decide on what you’re going to do next.

S: I suppose that’s because it’s volatile, this album.

―― Probably, yes.

S: So, you want to listen to something stable?

―― Rather, your last album and even the one before made me want to take a careful good look at this world, but this time, in comparison, left me restless instead.

S: Oh, yes. I get it. But I think Imai wanted to demolish that expectation that you can listen and feel at ease.

―― Ah, there’s that too.

S: Whatever we’ve done so far has always been for ourselves.

―― Yes. But this changing direction somehow feels like a result of all the members going down different routes. That’s why I’d find myself wanting to listen to the next release as soon as possible where, hopefully, all the members would have settled on one direction and gone with it.

S: I don’t know whether we can (lol). I’d expect that we wouldn’t communicate enough again anyway.

―― But haven’t you learnt your lesson?

S: Buーut, I don’t think we ever will.

―― Hmm, based on my earlier conversation with Imai-kun, it’s not very……

S: He hasn’t leant, has he?

―― But it’s not right for me to be the one telling him that it’s not good for him to be slow with the song composition.

S: But you should’ve said it.

―― No way (lol).

S: Please tell him, it’s not fair (lol).

 

Aesthetics of Invariance

Ongaku to Hito #087
April 2001

Text: Kanemitsu Hirofumi
Photos: Ogishima Minoru (荻島稔)
Hair & Makeup: Tanizaki Takayuki, Yamaji Chihiro (Fats Berry)

 

Last year, BUCK-TICK went on a hall tour, then a livehouse tour, and finally an auditorium¹ tour following the release of their first album in two and a half years. It was a sprightly burst of activity that is very much like them (lol) but who could complain about that. The 21st century has turned out to be a little bit different for these guys who would’ve normally gone back underground after all that activity.

On 28 March, the band will be releasing ONE LIFE, ONE DEATH CUT UP, the live CD, VHS, and DVD of the performance that they gave at Nippon Budokan. In addition to that, Schwein, the Japanese-German-British coalition that Sakurai and Imai have joined will soon commence with a tour also in the works. So this month, we’ll be talking about Schwein…… or so I hoped, but they haven’t made their music yet (lol). Hence, we’ll be talking about Sakurai Atsushi’s year 2000 and his band philosophy. And then, it’ll be Schwein in the next issue…… probably.

 

 

What is it…… This wasn’t our aim, but I guess we’ve succeeded in achieving versatility

 

―― This issue is going to be published in March so it might be a little late for this, but what do you think about your tour?

Sakurai (S): Mm…… It was the first time that we divided our shows between the hall venues and the livehouses but having tried it out, I came to realise the benefits and enjoyment of performing in the two different types of venues. It was especially so with the livehouses, though. I’ve never really given it much thought until now, but I think we are more suited to [livehouses] after all. Because we’ve never really made that kind of a distinction between the two until [last year].

―― Of course, because you’re closer to the audience. There’s a sort of unity, an atmosphere about it, or something.

S: You’re right…… Mm… This is something I only realised after we’ve split our shows into these two styles, but you could say our audience hold themselves back or something when they stick exactly to where their designated seats are…… It’s like they sit and stay still (dry laugh). And that’s certainly quite, well, I don’t need to say it again, but being able to move and act however they wish…… When I get to see that from the stage, I’d sincerely feel that it was a good thing that we decided to do this. Part of it is because we’re closer, yes, and us as performers also get to feel the liberation from a regulated world that live concerts are too. Also, for us, we won’t feel like we’re putting on a performance with a formal sense of “showing” something but rather, we can leave it as unpolished.

―― So, let’s look back at your activities in 2000 again.

S: Of course, broadly speaking we changed record labels and all that, and thinking about the time when we were recording, we’ve started working on our music so we didn’t really have much time to spare, but I could definitely sense that everyone was feeling positive with the fresh start.

―― And that wasn’t like, a sense of urgency or anything like that.

S: It sure wasn’t. If we did feel anything like that, it’d be more likely that 2 or 3 years ago, we’d already be feeling, “So, anyway, we’ve released a single,” then started to wonder, “Which company should we go to?”.

―― How did the band fare during those uncertain times?

S: Mm, the pace and stance of the band itself didn’t really change from our usual, but as you’d expect, if you’re asking about things that aren’t related to music, we can’t really…… How should I put this…… We can’t really do anything on our own. I guess I can’t help saying childish things like that (dry laugh), but in the end, I’d rather leave those things to people I trust to handle, so.

―― It could be said that the band still stands in that unstable situation, or rather, you don’t even budge an inch, right?

S: That’s definitely because it’s me and the other 4…… For example, I’ve often been asked whether I’d like to go solo or anything like that, but there are a lot of good and bad points to consider and all that…… But anyway, it’s definitely because when I look around me, I see the same faces I’ve always known and they’re all feigning ignorance as if they don’t know anything.

―― Fufufu, feigning ignorance (lol).

S: Well, it’s me wondering whether they know that I’m getting offers or not (lol). Then, I’d suddenly feel at home, in a way. I can’t do anything even if they felt bothered by it, but I don’t really worry or feel negatively about it. It’s not some kind of weird confidence or anything like that but it’s just, I feel that whether they cut our contract or whatever they do to us, whatever happens we’ll somehow make things work, or rather, no matter what happens, it’ll turn out alright. My thoughts don’t really go in a negative direction. But…… Well, there are times when I’d feel uneasy, just personally speaking. Like when I’m working on the singing, or the lyrics, or the staging, or I get stuck while working on an album and I’m feeling like, “I have nothing more to offer!!”…… Those insecurities sometimes come out of nowhere, but when it really comes down to it, I can visualise in my head what I’d do for that piece of music, or the staging and all of those things on my own. As a result, I’d get so absorbed in it that I’d get into a bit of a high. You could say, that’s why my frustration disappears completely.

―― So you’ve just about never given any conscious thought to the possibility of the band breaking up?

S: …… Conscious thought…… Mm… Well, I’ve thought about those types of situations to kill time (lol).

―― And?

S: I think it sounds like a pain in the ass (lol). No matter what happens, there’s no chance we’ll ever talk about “divorce”! (Emphasis added)

―― Ahahahaha! Sounds just like what a woman would say.

S: Yeaah, I got reminded of a bunch of past experiences (dry laugh).

―― I see (lol). But, say, for example, if you wanted to “depict life and death”,  or “sing love songs”, if you had themes like that, you don’t necessarily have to stick to being in a band to do that, right? I just wonder where your motivation to make music in a band comes from.

S: Mm………… I guess it might be because it’s easy (lol). Working hard, words like, “You can’t buy hard work,” and all that, I absolutely haaate those, you know (dry laugh). And…… Mmm…… This is a band that we’ve built together from scratch after all. People keep telling me, “Go solo,” but, mm…… It’s troublesome, and I don’t really like leaving my house empty, you know?

―― What fatherly comments (lol). I guess you want to protect your family.

S: Noo, I don’t like that sort of clinginess (dry laugh). I don’t like being cheated on too though, but…… I’m happy that I’m being asked (to go solo and things like that), but I suppose, in the end, essentially, what I want to be is the vocalist of a band, you know. Besides, there’s also the fact that the other members will possess whatever I’m lacking in. And if we’re talking about someone who was a solo artist to begin with and then later decided to start a band, they’d already know the lightness of moving along freely too. I might be saying too much, but lots of bands change their lineups, and there are those who had members go solo, or start other bands, but…… the original is still the best, or something (dry laugh). There are certainly cases where things are different, and there are lots of people who do great as solo artists, but somehow that power is…… With the focus on their personal power, even if they’re performing in the form of a band, in the end, they’re still not a band, are they? It’d just look like that [solo artist] person is the only one giving his all (dry laugh).

―― Speaking of which, you’ve recently started a unit in the form of Schwein. I was hoping you could tell us more about how it came to be.

S: Hmmm…… I really don’t know! (Squarely)

―― Hahahahaha! It happened before you realised it? (Lol)

S: No, it’s not quite that but…… I think it was last year, around the time when we were doing our recording? That this topic came up. It’s not the kind of thing that just comes to mind, you know? I’m not agile, and if I’m giving my all working on one thing, anything else turns into a pain in the ass. So, I think Raymond (Watts / PIG) had given it a lot of thought, but it was only around the end of last year when things finally became reality in the form of a “unit”…… Although, even now, I still don’t know what it’ll be like (lol). Of course, as you already know, it started from SCHAFT and we did gigs together two years ago, went on tour together too. We’ve also contributed music to each others’ CDs and took part as guests too. We’ve always had that kind of relationship. Although somehow, I don’t really know why he’s so interested in us (lol), but he’d call us whenever something comes up. For Raymond, he’s got PIG to work on and perform in America too, so he didn’t actually have to go through all that trouble to deliberately invite Asians to do this (dry laugh). That was the very first thing I thought, anyway. I don’t think we’ve talked about it before. That’s why I can’t really go into detail. We don’t even have songs yet (dry laugh).

―― Ahaha. Then, is there anything that Sakurai-san personally keeps in mind for what you’ll do in Schwein? Perhaps, like wanting to do something different here, as compared to what you usually do in BUCK-TICK.

S: Mm… Personally, I’d say it’s basically the same, I think. But, although I’m doing this with Imai, both the music and environment will change completely, so I think that would change me too. That’s something to look forward to as well.

―― When we look at this combination of Raymond of PIG, Sascha of MDFMK, and Imai Hisashi, you can’t help but get the feeling that sound will be prioritised over words, so what is it that Sakurai-san thinks should be expressed in that?

S: Well, you know, as a Japanese…… Fufufu. The, what do you call it, the feeling that there’s no difference between a British and a German, I get that feeling, but there’s a nuance that only the Japanese have when it comes to song and…… I guess that’s pretty much it, though. I’m just thinking that I should just do what I need to do. My best, or maybe, un-best (lol).

―― Fuhahaha! So, I guess we’ll talk more about Schwein next month.

S: Please contact Raymond for a proper story (lol). Work on the tracking for our video(s) and all that are still going on, right, so I can’t quite transition away from BUCK-TICK.

―― Is there a need for you to switchover?

S: Yeah. Although, I don’t really think it’s particularly necessary for me to switch from the BUCK-TICK version of me to the Schwein version or something. This is more about switching from the work of “making it even better” during the tracking to the creative work in composing. Because I always start from the surface of it (dry laugh). I would want to set up my own world nicely and do things properly inside of it (lol). When it comes to composing, I would want to get into that mode and work on it all in one go, but I can’t really do that well.

―― Like thinking about things while listening to PHYSICAL NEUROSE or what (lol).

S: Fuhahahaha.

―― But anyway, why did you decide to perform that song live?

S: Ah, well, Imai was…… Initially, well, it’s how we’ve always done things but we’d brainstorm about which songs from the album and our back catalogue would be good to perform. I’d often mull over the setlist and things like that, but everyone leaves it to me, so. At that point, I’d say, “Everyone disregard the line-up and structure and tell me what songs you want to play.” Then Imai slides in and mentions that song. Although, it was a great help to me that he said it without thinking too much about it, you know. Everyone’s restraint…… Well, by now there’s no such thing as holding back or mincing our words, though (lol). They’d just tell me things like, “I’ll leave it to you.” Then, when it’s all up to me, I’d be stuck in a dilemma (dry laugh).

ーー Ahaha! I guess they just want you to decide.

S: But I’m biased, you see. I’d end up picking all the daa~rk and gloomy songs (dry laugh). We also performed LOVE ME, SPEED, and ICONOCLASM, right? Just when I was wondering what should we do with those 3 songs towards the end, that song was raised. It was actually brought up during our first tour, the hall tour, but I wasn’t quite convinced. It made me think, “It’s kind oーf, mm, I don’t know if it’ll workー?” So, it was only after we were pretty much done with the hall and livehouse shows that…… this inconceivable song came around so I’m really relieved that it did, like, “Ahh, thank goodness.”

―― Your “ultimate weapon” (lol).

S: Mhahaha! Although, I think there are quite a number of people who don’t know that song.

―― Right? But when it comes to performing such an old song, won’t you somehow…… get that sense of “incompatibility”? Looking at it now.

S: I do. Especially when I start singing, I feel it very strongly. I don’t think [the others] would get much of a sense of that since [they’re] playing instruments, though. I even found myself thinking, “Ah, how embarrassing… These words, I don’t really want to say them now.” (Dry laugh).

―― Although, it really felt like a breakthrough for you to suddenly do PHYSICAL NEUROSE right there and then, didn’t it?

S: That’s true. It would’ve never been a thing before, but what is it…… this wasn’t our aim, but I guess we’ve succeeded in achieving that sort of versatility. It’s not like we can rely on hit songs forever (lol)…… It’s probably phrased badly, but it’s something that makes me feel, “If we play this song, it’ll probably make things interesting.”

―― Like a breaking ball²?

S: Right, something like that. If we played JUST ONE MORE KISS or something at that point of the show, you can already guess that the audience will probably get all hyped but (visualising)…… Mmー I guess it’s a good thing sometimes, though (bright smile).

―― Oh! (Lol) Well, I suppose I can expect a little more from your next tour (lol).

S: Mmmー (lol).

―― Mhahaha! So, you might’ve been asked about this before, but does BUCK-TICK have a strong desire to constantly stay up to date as a band?

S: Nope, we don’t. There are probably people who like doing that, but we don’t want to burden ourselves with that kind of weight and force ourselves to carry it. I think we’re capable of accepting anything and everything if the time is right for us, but since the very beginning, we never wanted to be at the forefront of that.

―― What about when it comes to language?

S: It’s the same with language too. As long as they are words and phrases that I understand well and are fresh to me [I’d use them]. Whether they’re outdated or recent slangs, I don’t know. But if they’re fresh and I can grasp it, then anything goes.

―― I can’t really imagine Sakurai-san using words like “you’re bugging me [uzaa~i³]” anyway (lol).

S: Ahh, I hate that kind of language (dry laugh). Like, “for sure [zettee⁴]” and those kinds, right?

―― Ahaha. Chew on those words and digest them properly. 

S: If I can digest them…… I still don’t think I can make use of them after all (lol).

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

¹ This “auditorium” actually refers to the venues of TOUR ONE LIFE, ONE DEATH which was held in large convention centre venues, namely Orix Theatre in Osaka, Nagoya Congress Center, and Tokyo’s Nippon Budokan.

² In baseball, a breaking ball is a pitch that does not travel straight as it approaches the batter. It isn’t a specific pitch by that name, but is any pitch that “breaks”, such as a curveball, slider, or screwball.

³ ウザイ (uzai) is basically the Japanese slang version of describing something as annoying or irritating. It’s a very casual/informal form.

⁴ ぜってぇ (zettee) is very casual/informal kind of slang-ish version of 絶対 (zettai). It means the same thing, which is “definitely/for sure”, or something along those lines.

 

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Scans:  tigerpal from LJ

 

 

Double-Edged BUCK-TICK

An Intense Hunger For Life

Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll
June 1995

photography Hitoshi Iwakiri (岩切等)
hair & makeup Takayuki Tanizaki (谷崎隆幸)
styling Tomoharu Yagi (八木智晴)

 

It’s been 2 years since their last album, darker than darkness.
Following the release of their 2 singles, Uta and Kodou, BUCK-TICK’s new album,
Six/Niɴe will arrive on May 15.
That special withdrawn decadence which was brought to fruition in darker~
has been eclipsed by the intense hunger for life portrayed in this album.
But what does it all mean?
From demise to rebirth…… The key to this are the north and south poles of a magnet or in other words,
hidden in the album title which implies the concept of opposites.
In this issue, we’ll close in on them with a double feature of personal interviews with the members of the band
and the direct confrontation between Onojima and Imai over the single Uta!!

 

 

 

 

Individual Interviews

_______________________

Atsushi Sakurai

Interview by: Onojima Dai

This interview was held right after the conversation with Imai that comes later.
Here, there are quite a lot of differences in the nuances of what they say. And this is the first time that Sakurai so blatantly shared his opinions about his fellow band members. Although it is of course that these opinions are, ultimately, based on the fact that the members have a close relationship with each other, like family.

I do sense the mismatch between the singing and the music, and I get what you mean by that.
But the main reason behind this is really because that guy was too tardy with the songwriting.

―― What did you have in mind when you were in the process of producing this album?

Sakurai (S): It was definitely…… to stop using words that I didn’t know. Even with the applications of words and phrases, I decided that I’d stop using things I don’t know. It probably sounds weird, but I guess it feels as if doing that reveals my own stupidity to a certain extent, whether in the music or the lyrics. Things like vocabulary, it shows everyone your ability, like how you would with your musical instruments and your technique. So, it’s already become difficult for me to do that, things like trying to make myself seem like a bigger deal than I really am.

―― Why did you need to make yourself look like a big deal?

S: (Long silence) I don’t know. I don’t even know if I could make that last either.

―― Maybe you didn’t want to be looked down upon?

S: That might be the reason. But we can’t bluff, can we? Humans. Especially when it comes to this sort of…… Well, maybe that’s not true for everyone. …… Because, me, I’m no actor. Neither am I a poet, right? I’m just a member of a band, anyway.

―― Do you have some sort of complex around being a band member?

S: (Silence) No, no. I don’t.

―― For you, do you feel that you don’t want to fit into the role of the band’s vocalist or that you can’t?

S: Mmn…… (Long silence) …… I don’t know (lol). Do you think so?

―― Don’t ask me.

S: Hahahah. Well, even I don’t know myself.

―― Don’t you think that people in general all get the feeling that their present state of self isn’t their true self, or that “This isn’t who I am.”?

S: I think that might’ve gradually gone away. This might sound contradictory but I’m usually thinking, “Ah~ So this is the kind of person I am.”

―― How did you come to think like that?

S: It’s self-defense, isn’t it? It’s easier like this. To me, at least. It’s like, if I’m at ease, I can deal with anything that comes my way, I suppose.

―― Looking at the lyrics in this album, there are a lot of times when expressions like “I want proof of my life” seem to come up out of nowhere. Does this have some sort of relation to this change that youspoke of?

S: Yeah. Yeah…… But poetry, it’s nothing more than theatrics after all. If I didn’t feel that I had to write, then I wouldn’t. Ah, I might’ve written poetry but I don’t know about song lyrics.

―― Is poetry different from song lyrics?

S: I think it’s different. To me.

―― Is putting music to words itself something that feels unnatural to you?

S: There’s some part of turning my words into lyrics that feels quite unnatural. Because I have to write according to Imai’s or Hide’s music. Even for a phrase like “そうですか [I see] (so-u-de-su-ka)]”, if Imai gives me tan-tan-tan, three beats, it would turn into “そ・う・か [I see] (so-u-ka)”. I noticed that this time, because of that, I had to, as much as possible, do my best to not deviate. From what I’ve written and what I had in mind.

―― So, this album, I thought that the balance between the music and the singing was exceptionally off. That was particularly so in Uta. It’s as if the singing is losing out to the music, or they just don’t match up or something. Though, Imai-kun made it sound as if that was, to some extent, intentional.

S: I can’t, I’m not capable of production like that, of myself. That guy…… Calling him “that guy” sounds terrible. He’s capable of doing that kind of production, you see. I don’t think about those things or go that far. Although, I do sense that mismatch and I do get what you mean by that……

―― Hmmm…… I don’t know if I should say it……

S: Please say anything you want.

―― I got the feeling that there wasn’t enough communication between Sakurai-kun and Imai-kun prior to writing a song and all that, though…… Or am I wrong?

S: No, there was barely anything lacking. That more or less happened when we got to the later half of our work, but there wasn’t anything like that in beginning. Then, after it starts to take some shape, we’d decide that we like this, we don’t like this, things like that…… There’s no planning on the whole, yeah. There are positives to that but there are also things that just don’t work. I don’t think we ever said it was a good thing, though.

―― Even compared to before?

S: No, but we’ve never done that before either…… Because the songs that we wrote earlier on… Like Uta… I guess it’s just Uta. There’s nothing with that song. I didn’t want to say anything, and I was frustrated too…… Because, you see, both him and I, we hate giving in. We also hate making others bend over for us.

―― But weren’t you in perfect agreement for your previous albums and releases?

S: Were we?

―― (Lol) Well, that’s just what it sounded like to me based on what I heard. That both of your goals were aligned and the band came together to move towards the one same direction. Not that it’s in monotony, you know.

S: Mm…………

―― Though, I suppose it just so happened that the result was unanimous.

S:  Yeah. I guess you can say that. Which is why this time, I really couldn’t…… grasp it. Because even after we’ve started recording, Imai hadn’t written the songs yet. Then it was a rush, recording the rhythm section, I didn’t even know anything about the other band members’ work too, yeah. It’s too late to blame anyone for anything, but I won’t blame anyone so I’ll just blame myself (lol).

―― I thought BUCK-TICK achieved a point of perfection with darker than darkness. Then, both Imai-kun and Sakurai-kun decided to change things this time around.

S: Yes.

―― But even if you chose to change, won’t you end up looking at the disparate parts? That’s why you’d get the feeling it doesn’t come together as an album.

S: Do you feel that way?

―― Yes. Frankly speaking.

S: On the whole?

―― There are, of course, good songs but if we’re talking about the power of everything coming together to become one, as the album’s appeal as one work, I think it’s definitely your previous work that has it.

S: But, you know, the main reason for this is definitely because that guy was really too late.

―― But it’s not the first time, is it?

S: No, he really was too tardy this time (lol). We couldn’t really do much about it, you know, with the songs that came last.

―― You’ve got a schedule planned out this time around, though. With the film concert and all that, so I guess you were also in a situation where you absolutely had to stick to the predetermined release date.

S: It’s not great, is it? I especially hated that. But, you see, even though I didn’t say anything, my voice was crushed. We had no choice but to do it. Well, even if I said this, it wouldn’t have changed anything. Rather than having no release at all, we decided to bring it as close to 100% and release it, though. I think that’s the kind of mismatch problem that Onojima -san sensed. Be it between the vocals and the instruments or between different instruments. Although, there’s really nothing that can be done even if I complain about it. But although there are parts that you can’t digest, I think it’s fine as long as people still feel that it’s good. Because I feel that it’s very much a case where if you think it’s good, it’s good.

―― Do you think that the misalignment that you felt with Uta has been solved by the second half of the album’s production?

S: Mm…… Rather than solved, we just stopped caring about it.

―― Gave up?

S: It’s not that we gave up…… We thought that it sounded convincing, that it’s good like this.

―― Didn’t you wonder why you had to persuade yourself into believing that it sounds convincing? 

S: (Lol) Convincing myself…… I think it’s definitely because…… How do I put this…… It stinks but having formed such a band, I guess we’re just happy that we can do what we like, so it’s simply because of that…… Is this a boring answer?

―― No, not at all. Because it means that you’ve still got that fresh feeling.

S: No, rather than saying it’s still here, I think it’s more like I’ve been taking it for granted until now.

―― Oh? Did you have some sort of change of heart?

 

…… And that’s unfortunately where we’ll stop because we’ve run out of printing space. The latter half of this interview will be published in the next issue of this magazine. Look forward to it.

 

 

Return to Top

_______________________

Hisashi imai

Interviewer: Oshibe Keiko

It might be contradictory to the work I do, but I’m fascinated by this breakthrough album that turns “genre” into a mere empty word, so much so that it makes me abandon the thought of critiquing or analysing it. That is usually a direct reflection of an artist’s views and instincts, and yet, although it’s convincing, it doesn’t tend towards logic. That is simply an abstrusity that comes from the fact that the album is not bound by the logic of genres. That said, this new album by BUCK-TICK might just be an abstrusity  in itself. Even if we tried to make sense of it with logic, it is an album that immediately turns the pleasant feeling of sensual enjoyment into something profound. In that sense, we could probably say that this work is an album in which Imai was given the ability to tackle his instinctive urges as a composer in a more direct manner than usual.

If we’re talking about nerve-wracking, I guess it’s my bad for being tardy with the composing (lol).
I did have the intention of finishing things up early, but somehow…… I wonder what happened (lol).

―― Well, anyway. In terms of creative inspiration, what’s it like? This time around.

Imai (I): Nothing particularly new. I don’t think it’s any different than before.

―― I heard that you were still coming with new songs even after all the rhythm sections were recorded, though.

I: Because I just kept thinking that there was not enough, and just continued composing.

―― What’s “not enough”?

I: A bunch (lol). Same with the overall balance too. But what I was really worried about were the songs which came first. They were really just vague…… They had this feeling that they were somehow lacking one other thing. Because I wanted to do that. In the latter half, the songs, it was just…… we were late with those because of small details like drum patterns and bass riffs, guitar riffs, these things.

―― Were there any instances where the final product turned out to be a whole other song, or you had new techniques you wanted to try out, or anything like that?

I: In terms of techniques…… There were songs that were made with programming too, so that’s about it. There wasn’t really anything special in the way we did things. But also because it feels like somehow, we haven’t really found our way out of it.

―― Did you have some kind of vision for this album on the whole?

I: Mmm…… I can’t quite put it into words.

―― Say, for example, the title. Did you have a specific idea in mind?

I: The complete opposites of North and South…… The North and South poles. I had that sort of two-sides-of-the-same-coin idea. I kept thinking about that for some reason. Then I figured that indicating it with 6 and 9 might be the easiest way to get the message across.

―― As something which symbolises the aspect of opposites coexisting.

I: That’s right. Not that it’s a good or a bad thing. Aside from that…… I’m not too sure.

―― So it doesn’t particularly hold any deeper meaning. It’s just a symbol for what you had in mind.

I: Yeah. It’s just because I had that North, South idea in the beginning.

―― I see. So earlier, we talked about your vision for this album, but what about for the previous album? Personally, it gives me the sense of being run through. In terms of imagery, it’s like a futuristic yet decadent landscape at the end of the road.

I: In a way…… I suppose I wanted to do songs that are more stripped down, noisier, those types.

―― I think that gives this album a sense of speed that isn’t just about being fast and also a kind of exceptionally weighty feeling, but did you deliberately intend to enhance those elements for this album?

I: Those aspects of weight and speed naturally occurred without any deliberate effort this time around. So for that…… It was just a matter of letting it grow.

―― I wondered if perhaps those elements were increased as a result of taking that image which inspired you and transferring it into the music at a higher level of concentration.

I: Meaning?

―― Like, maybe you had less doubt than before when you’re putting the song together. For example, the kind of hesitancy where the idea comes to you and then you think, “Maybe it’s better not to do this.”

I: Ahh. Well, that it’s good to speed things up and just do it once I get an idea was…… something I only realised in the later half of my composition work (lol). Because before, I’ve only always been…… aware of it.

―― That said, I felt that this album turned out to be rather frank, though.

I: Well, that’s the idea (lol). But I know that it definitely feels best when the groove really comes out strong like that. It’s just that I ended up taking a whole day to think about how the intro should go, about the rhythm patterns, and things like that. And it was hard to expand from there.

―― When did you start composing for this album?

I: Around December…… I think it was around then. Probably.

―― So at what point did things start to stagnate after you started composing?

I: The first song was done quickly. Then I redid the second song about 4 times at home. That’s why I have quite a number of different tunes that no one has ever heard before, though. …… At that point…… was when I ran quite far behind.

―― No one’s ever heard them before…… What kind of music is it? Those you’ve rejected on your own.

I: No, well. It’s just kind of music that we’ve never ever done before. I thought it might feel a bit wrong if we were to go with those.

―― That it’s not quite the type for BUCK-TICK to play?

I: Nah. It’s the songs themselves.

―― Ahh. …… So, there were quite a number of songs, weren’t there?

I: There were. That’s why I think we might’ve been able to wrap things up a little earlier if we just did the songs in the order that they came to me, though.

―― You mean, like the song you’re most interested in or whichever song you’re having the most trouble with at the moment?

I: The song that I was troubling with on my own was Kodou. Because its a song that’s easy to misunderstand. Depending on the way it’s captured

―― Specifically speaking?

I: It can be poppy and melodious and cute and pretty and all that. For BUCK-TICK to do that…… I was worried about whether the band could pull it off or not. …… But I figured that if I leave it up to Acchan, he’d get it. That’s why I handed the song over as it was.

―― Ah, so it’s not from the perspective of the listener. But rather, the song could end up with a completely different impression depending on your band members’ interpretations. So, do you think that it turned out well in the end?

I: Yeah. I think so.

―― By the way, earlier, Yagami-san said that the recording atmosphere had improved a lot compared to what it was before. Does Imai-san personally also think that such a…… change has happened?

I: Because it felt like a chore during our first album, second, and until our third album. The recording. We had no time, we had to do one song a day, we’d go into the studio and when everyone’s there, we’d start. It was…… a chore (lol).

―― (Lol) So, were you simply able to enjoy the recording work itself this time around?

I: …… Although, there were times when it felt like something wasn’t quite right (lol). But I think we were able to go through with it very very well this time around.

―― It’s just that in reality, I assume it’d often be nerve-wracking.

I: If we’re talking about nerve-wracking…… I guess it’s my bad for being tardy with the composing (lol) and that was really what made it nerve-wracking. Although, it wasn’t all that stressful once we got to the recording stage.

―― But because it was so nerve-wracking, wouldn’t you think, “I am definitely going to make sure that I’ll finish this up early next time” (lol).

I: If I did things with that intention…… If I did that, we’d probably end up in a position where we’d be saying there’s no way we can be any more polished than we’d ever been (lol). But really, I did have the intention to do that, you know? It’s just that somehow…… I wonder what happened (lol).

―― (Lol) Soー. How much time do you think is enough time to compose an album’s worth of songs?

I: ………… Until I’m done.

―― Until you’re done. That sounds like you’re going to take forever, though.

I: Nah. …… Nothing like that (lol).

 

 

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Hidehiko Hoshino

Interview by: Sasaki Mika

There’s always an air of calm around Hide, reminiscent of his beautiful melodies. In this album, he has recorded 4 songs and he appears to have become more aware of his position. Is it almost time for the taciturn backseat rider’s counter attack!?

I thought it’d be great if every song would have its own strong character
and we’d be able to play around with the sound to turn it all into one album.

―― Did you expect this album to end up this lengthy?

Hoshino (H): Nope, I didn’t think that there would be so many songs. Because I thought the most we would have would be 12 or 13.

―― I wonder why it turned out like this.

H: Imai-kun is why (lol).

―― How did you feel before you started composing?

H: Personally, I didn’t feel all that…… How do I say this. I felt that I couldn’t see the entirety of it at all and that I’d just write the songs I wanted to write. We compiled it later anyway.

―― Without any discussion to say, like, let’s do something like this?

H: Yeah, we didn’t do that. Then again, in the end, even if I did discuss things with Imai-kun, the differences in our sensibilities and things like that will definitely come to the fore, so you could say that it’s absolutely impossible for any one of us to be the same as the other. Such conversations didn’t happen precisely because we did our own thing. We previously did have discussions about what kind of album we wanted to make on the whole, but this time was special; we didn’t have that.

―― So, what did Hide-kun personally hope for it to be like?

H: I imagined that every song would have its own strong character and we’d be able to play around with the sound to turn it all into one album.

―― Was this 2 year gap between your previous album and the current one planned?

H: Mmm…… I wonder. I wonder if it is (lol).

―― (Lol) What did you do last year?

H: Relaxed so much that I got tired of it.

―― You’re tired of it?

H: Tired of it (lol).

―― Did you write anything during that period of time?

H: Nope, not at all. I started composing when we started talking about releasing the first single, which was around the end of last year, I think. Around November or December. 

―― How many songs did you finish by then?

H: 2 songs. Uta’s b-side, Kimi e and one more. We dropped that one, and I originally composed Kimi e for the album but it didn’t feel quite right either so we used it as a b-side instead.

―― If Kimi e was included in the album, you’d have 5 songs in there, but this 5 was picked out of how many?

H: Around 8, I think. 3 were dropped.

―― But, by the time Hide-kun had already presented all your songs, Imai-kun’s songs had yet to be done, right?

H: Yeah. At all (lol).

―― In that situation, didn’t you think of adding more of your songs into the roster?

H: Nope, not really. (Lol) I did think of putting them in if we could, but in the end, if I wasn’t satisfied with the music as a demo tape, I wouldn’t release it anyway.

―― It appears that no matter what, it’s Imai-kun’s songs that determine the album’s direction.

H: Yeah, they do.

―― If that’s the case, then it feels like Hide-kun is always just sitting in the backseat along for the ride. Do you like being in that sort of a position?

H: Mmm…… Rather than saying I like it (lol), well, it’s the natural flow of things.

―― You can tune into what Imai-kun composes because you’d feel that it’s good enough for you too?

H: Ahh, that, I do.

―― Well then, please comment on Imai-kun’s music in this album.

H: There are a lot of cool songs. The songs in the latter half were made in a hurry but they’re really cool. Like love letter. I think this one was probably composed last.

―― But do I wonder why that person took so long.

H: Don’t you think that it’s simply because of the way he thinks? I guess he probably started late too, but it’s most likely because he works things out down to the details.

―― Does no one push him about it?

H: We do. We do, but it’s completely useless (lol).

―― What’s it like recording again after 2 years?

H: It was tiring. The hours were long this time, and there were a lot of songs too. The recording itself was very…… How should I put this? In the first half of our progress, I would go into the studio on my own and work alone and that was nice. Since there wasn’t anyone else around me, I could relax and take my time with it.

―― Do you like that kind of solitary work?

H: When it comes to recording, I prefer that. Because, after all, people sitting behind me in the studio will become a distraction. Especially when it comes to my own songs. It’s better for me to mess around however I want. Although this time, it took a long time to get to business after I was done with that.

―― Waiting around drains your motivation more (lol). That’s why it doesn’t feel like you made [this album] together.

H: Because there was a lot of solo work. Like doing things in different studios and all that.

―― Are you responsible for your own songs?

H: There is that, yes, but even Imai-kun’s songs are done by him going into a different studio to work on it on his own. We were being pressed for time so if we didn’t do that, we wouldn’t have made it in time.

―― Without thinking about how the 2 guitars would play together and things like that?

H: That was done to some extent in the demos so we just listened to that and played accordingly. We did discuss it, though.

―― And this Rakuen was a different version than the b-side to Kodou.

H: We did think of putting the single version into the album, but I got a bit selfish and asked for a version that removed the drums and bass and all that and only featured the tabla, and that was what we put into the album. Part of the reason was because I just wanted to try using the tabla as an instrument.

―― When did you decide on the album title?

H: Just recently. Around the time we were done with tracking.

―― How do you interpret this title?

H: I guess you could say it’s interesting. Deep.

―― I was hoping you’d explain this “depth”.

H: I’m also not that…… (Lol) I wasn’t the one who came up with it so I don’t really know but…… I think it’s got something to do with symmetrical opposites, like the north and south pole.

―― Maybe 9 songs are the key to the album?

H: …… Could it be? (Lol)

―― I’m asking you! (Lol)

H: Hahhahhah. Maybe not?

―― There are people saying things like, “It’s the BUCK-TICK revival!”

H: (Lol) That’s not our intention. Well, it’s true that it’s been a long while though…… Hasn’t it?

―― And there are a lot of new bands who people are labelling as post-BUCK-TICK too.

H: Really? Well, I’m not familiar with that so I’ve got no idea.

―― Aren’t you worried that you might’ve lost fans to other bands?

H: No, not really. No such thing.

―― No interest in the Japanese music scene at all?

H: None at all. Because I don’t listen to them, nor do I read the magazines.

―― So you separate yourself from the trends of the general public to create your own world?

H: Yeah, that’s probably it. Don’t you think that’s better? Besides, I think it’s good for people to respectively make the music they want to make.

―― Then, what kind of reaction to the album are you hoping for from your listeners?

H: It’d be nice if they like it.

―― That’s itー?

H: Yeah. Hahhahhah. No, really.

―― Did you think about including the general public with your core fans when you release an album?

H: Sometimes I do, in the end…… While it’s true that if we made pop music…… I don’t know if you’d call it a boundary, but there are times when I get very concerned about it, though……

―― Are you no longer bothered now?

H: Rather than now, it’s like, turning down the noise distortion on the guitar alone would give it a completely different sound. I’m doing all the things that I think are good, so I don’t really think about such things.

―― So, it’s good enough for you if you win over the undecided by doing whatever you want to do?

H: Yeah, that’s right.

―― I suppose you can only think like that if you have the confidence that you’ve made something good, right.

H: Yeah. I especially feel that this time around.

 

 

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yutaka Higuchi

Interview by: Sasaki Mika

We meet every month, but there’s no one who stays the same as much as Yuta. I think it’s a welcome addition to the band to have such a person as their bassist. Although, I would’ve liked it if he would write songs like before, if possible.

That Imai-san sure is a genius. That’s something I’ve reaffirmed when we started recording again after this break.
Because listening to the 1st and 14th songs, you wouldn’t have thought that both were from the same band, right? That’s why it’s fun.

―― What do you think of the final product?

Yuta (Y): There were so many songs that I wondered how it would turn out when we put it all together, but once we put the 1st song, the 15th and this one right in the middle (the 8th) between them when we were finishing things up, everything changed. Rather than the songs just playing one after another, they really brought about a clear image of the whole album.

―― Were these 3 songs an idea that came up at the end to bring some sort of completeness to the album?

Y: There weren’t really any songs that sounded similar or were of the same genre, so we thought they’d be good for that purpose. We’ve never made an album which started with speech either so I thought it could be interesting.

―― Is there anything in the way you produced this album that was different from what you’ve been doing thus far?

Y: Most of it stayed the same but because the songs were composed late, we were recording the rhythm parts until quite late in our schedule. At least, that’s the impression I have. But the way we did things was the same.

―― Was this the latest ever?

Y: Look, we haven’t even started recording the rhythm parts for other songs when we were already working on the tracking (lol).

 

―― Is that undesirable?

Y: It’s not that, but I was hoping that I’d have a little more time to rehearse my part.

―― Wouldn’t you feel uneasy when you can barely see the big picture for this album?

Y: I was more or less uneasy, yeah. But there wasn’t really anything like changes in the organisation [of work] or anything like that [so it wasn’t too bad].

―― You’ve said before that it’s easy to see what Imai-kun wants to do with his songs, so it’s easy when it comes to figuring out the arrangement too, right?

Y: Yeah.

―― Considering that, would you say that there’s likely a clear picture of the kind of album you’d be making in Imai-kun’s head?

Y: Hmm…… Probably.

―― Did he put that picture into words and share it with the band?

Y: Mmm…… There is a certain extent of communication with us when he’s done with a song so…… Yeah.

―― I wonder how he intended to bring out that sense of completeness.

Y: Mm…… I don’t know that much about it. About what’s in Imai-san’s mind.

―― Then, what does Yuta-kun think about it? As a member of the band.

Y: Like the vibe of the music. Since we had so many songs, I personally thought of suggesting to get rid of some if it so happened that things didn’t sound good together or anything like that. But it turned out nice when we tried lining them up anyway [so we kept them all]. It’s somehow like an atypical 2-CD set, isn’t it? The album’s got that kind of image.

―― What kind of role do you think this album will play in BUCK-TICK’s career?

Y: While we’re doing new things, this new album’s also still got the good parts of what we’ve done before. I personally don’t feel like we’ve used a different approach than our usual, so, yeah, we’re trying new things while taking all the good aspects that we’ve got since our very first album. That’s why I think it’ll be a very easy album to digest for those who have always been listening to our music.

―― So, you’re saying that’s what the album resulted in?

Y: Yeah. I think that’s unintentional.

―― When you say you’re doing something new, which songs are most representative of that?

Y: Probably these few, for sure (points at 9th, 14th, and 15th song). It feels like we’ve increased the number of different sides we have to us again. Compared to our previous album, we’ve completely switched up the atmosphere in this album, haven’t we? It feels like you can clearly see the vibe of each individual song.

―― I guess that might also be the result of the songs being worked on in batches rather than all together.

Y: I think that’s another big reason for it. We’re always working on one song at a time, but in the end, the totality of it, I suppose, turned out to be slightly different than our previous album. And this time around, the vibe of our previous album still remains in a good way. That’s why it wasn’t like we got rid of everything and started back from square one again. I guess you could say that it’s like our standard work but not quite.

―― A transitional album?

Y: …… I don’t know about that. Not yet.

―― How do you feel about making music with everyone again after 2 years?

Y: We make all sorts of remarks here and there so it was fun. I don’t quite remember exactly what they were if you want examples, though (lol).

―― Was it fun while playing too?

Y: It was. It’s just that there are too many one chord songs (lol). That’s why it can get a little bit boring playing bass, but on the contrary, I thought that made it more interesting too. Because then I could play it very thoroughly. I mostly played with my fingers this time around. I guess that was fundamentally different. I basically changed my play style. Deciding between my fingers and the pick is usually dependent on the vibe of the song, but this time, I felt that there were more songs that would be better played with my fingers so I naturally chose to go with that.

―― Which songs do you particularly like how you played?

Y: I suppose it’s these (points at 2nd, 14th, and 15th song). Ah, but I like all of them~.

―― No regrets?

Y: None.

―― You’ve done everything that you’re capable of at this point in time?

Y: I guess I feel that way too. But this time, I really felt, “Ahh, we’ve really made something great.” With the songs arranged in this order, it’s of course, don’t you think?

―― What do you think about the album title?

Y: It’s sleazy…… Actually, no (lol). What was it, something like, they’re actually the same even though they appear to be opposites. Like a sort of cycle.

―― Like a pattern?

Y: That can be rolled anyway you like. Like, something that has the same shape but turns into a completely different meaning once you roll it around. As to what it means…… I don’t know (lol).

―― Was there anything you’ve reaffirmed when you started recording again after that break?

Y: That Imai-san sure is a genius. That’s what came to mind. Because, although you’d get a particular vibe when you listen to this part (14th and 15th song), when you listen to the other songs, it’s a whole other feeling again. They bring something different that doesn’t exist in everything else you’ve heard. For example, if we look at Uta, it’s got a sound that’s unique to only Uta, right? That’s why I thought he’s really amazing.

―― So even if it takes time, it can’t be helped?

Y: Yeah (lol). Because listening to the 1st and 14th songs, you wouldn’t have thought that both were from the same band, right? It’s probably the same when we listen to the 2nd song too, though. That’s why it’s so much fun.

―― To me, I think that among the members, Yuta-kun is the one who is most aware of how people perceive you.

Y: Is that soー. I guess I am the type to care about how people see us.

―― Is it the one thing you think about the most?

Y: I wonder. But I think everyone wonders about how others perceive them, so I don’t think I’m all that conscious of it all the time, though……

―― You’re most in touch with the general public, right?

Y: But Imai-san’s the most popular, though?

―― Huuhー!?

Y: He’s popular. And he’s a people pleaser too. For me, it’s just because I talk a lot, right? The other members don’t talk at all but. Imai-san is a person who can explain things in 1 sentence where I’d take 10.

―― I see. Do you think that these 2 years were a needed break for the band to make this album?

Y: It was a good period of time for the band, wasn’t it? Not specifically because it enabled us to make this album. Well, I guess it plays a part, but I think it’s been a good 2 years. Besides, if we keep releasing things one after another, we’d look cheap. Although, if we really thought that it was good for us to release something every 3 months, then I think it’s fine, though.

―― As the big-name BUCK-TICK.

Y: We’re not big at all. We’re still rookies (lol).

―― But you’ve got tons of followers.

Y: I can’t say that. That’s for others to say. We’ve got our own hands full…… But that’s good, isn’t it? As long as everyone works hard.

―― As the headliners.

Y: I suppose so. Although we’re probably only ranked like maegashira-13¹ (lol). But I think it’s good enough if we feel that we really made a good album. Besides, this one’s got weight in it, doesn’t it? It’s over 70 minutes long. Quite something, isn’t it?

―― If you were to take a 70-minute train ride, you’d travel really far too.

Y: You’ll arrive at our hometown (lol).

 

 

Notes:

¹ In sumo, maegashira is the lowest of five ranks in the top makuuchi division. All the makuuchi wrestlers who are not ranked in san’yaku are ranked as maegashira, numbered from one at the top downwards. 13 is just one rank under the rank (14) that allows a wrestler to be promoted.

 

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Toll yagami

Interview by: Oshibe Keiko

“This is how it’s always been, but we don’t really keep to what we’ve grasped in our previous release. We do things as if we’re starting from scratch again,” said Yagami Toll. More importantly, it appears that new elements that are created through the band members interacting and influencing each other on stage will naturally tie into the next album. How has his own style evolved in that flow? That’s another part of the process we’ll find out as we talk about the album.

Even if Imai wrote JUST ONE MORE KISS for this album, we’d probably have tossed it out.
Because we prioritised our desire to do things that we’ve never done before for this album.

―― So, this album. Was there anything from your previous tour that you personally wanted to bring into it? Like something related to your drumming, or sensibilities.

Toll (T): Personally, there wasn’t anything in particular but…… Although there’s always been that wild aspect and things like that, I wanted to bring out more natural-sounding drums. That’s why I think most listeners might probably think that the drums sound muddy when they listen to it this time around. But I guess you could say that’s exactly what makes it a truly rare sound coming from the drums. When you hear most drums in the flesh, their sound would be muddy. But when it gets picked up by the mic, it’d turn into a really clean and beautiful sound, right? But that’s not reality, so there’s a part of me that feels that this muddy sound is contrarily better.

―― It seemed especially so in the intro of Kimi no Vanilla.

T: Yeah (lol). That was recorded with something like this (tape recorder for interviews). Because doing that created a really great effect.

―― That’s pretty extreme, but this kind of sound that seems as if you just walked into the studio and recorded on a whim is rather fresh, isn’t it? Gives it a unique vibe too.

T: I guess it’s because the muddiness of the drums itself makes it more real. We just did it with a simple, “How’s this?”, “Sounds good.” But it came together very well, didn’t it? That’s why I’ve had enough of processed, clear sound qualities…… then again, anything goes in these times, so I guess I just want to do things that other people don’t do. Which is why I told my friend’s kid who plays the drums, “Don’t copy me.” But the kid retorted, “There’s no way I can copy such a sound.” (Lol).

―― (Lol) On the other hand, was there ever a period of time when you sought to drum with precision for a clear sound?

T: Rather than seeking it, it naturally turned out that way. Probably like our 3rd album TABOO. I guess you could say it’s because we had a producer (Owen Paul) so I simply had to be precise. But that was also a lesson in a good way, and I get the feeling that it also led into the albums that followed.

―― Would you say that if not for that experience, it would only be much later on that you’d go in the direction that you’ve chosen for this album?

T: Yeah. It might probably only happen much later.

―― But in the past, I used to have the impression that you’d go all out drumming the 8-beat pattern, yet recently, it’s like you’re more toned down or something. For example, I noticed that you’ve shifted towards the idea that drums are supposed to be an instrument played by humans and that’s what they should be.

T: I’m not all that conscious of it, though. It’s just the way it is now. That’s why I’d say that if we’re talking half a year ago or half a year later, I might feel differently too. But, you know, our recording sessions used to be very tense, but now, I can even think about how roughly or relaxed I want to drum. In the past, I wouldn’t say that it was autonomic dysfunction but there was turmoil similar to that. It’s as if your head’s always spinning (lol).

―― Was it really that bad (lol).

T: Yeah. But I won’t be able to drum well if I get too excited either. Because that happens, I decided to get very relaxed for in darker~. Up until then, I had been drumming at full power like crazy but once I decided to do that, I somehow started to feel the groove in chunks. But I wanted to produce a rounded sound, you know. It was completely different once I started drumming with leeway to spare. It’s definitely because I could move freely when I did that. …… But for this album, I didn’t really think about that. I just wanted to drum so…… It might spell trouble for me to say this, but I don’t really know whether I did well or not yet (lol). Although, there’s a strong sense of accomplishment. But, simply put, I lose interest quickly in things that are immediately obvious. There were aspects in darker~ like that, but comparing that album to our current one, I think that album might still be easier to comprehend than this.

―― Could that partly be also due to the idea of making music with the listeners in mind having faded off?

T: But for us, we’ve never done that since the very beginning (lol).

―― Since the beginning (lol). Ever since you debuted?

T: Yeah. We’ve really been doing whatever we like. That’s why, I’m grateful that we do get sales to a certain extent, though (lol). But if we do something badly, it’s just for our own satisfaction anyway, right?

―― Then, do you get the sense that having made it this far, you can now do something like this too?

T: I don’t, not really. It’s just how things turned out when we gave it a go. We don’t even consider things like, “Shall we go with an easy to remember melody?” (Lol). Because we decide whether something is cool or not based on our own standards. Like, if one of us said, “Isn’t this tacky?”, that thing would get tossed out.

―― This perspective on how good something is, are the members of the band always in agreement over it?

T: …… Before, oftentimes Imai would say, “This will definitely be a good song so let’s do this,” and I’d retort, “This isn’t ever gonna work.” (Lol). But that doesn’t happen so much any more. In any case. We have to respect the other’s feelings (lol).

―― So, if there’s even the slightest disagreement, you’d have to put in the effort to understand each person’s opinion on what’s cool (lol).

T: Because we’re a democracy (lol). Majority wins. Whenever we have to decide on something. …… But the songs that Hide wrote in the beginning were very pop. I thought that was incredible. But Acchan said, “It’s not the kind of music we’re doing now.” And Imai’s one word of, “Old-fashioned.” (Lol).

―― (Lol) Did you decide to deliberately eliminate pop music or something like that? For this album.

T: Mm~n. That’s why I think if Imai wrote JUST ONE MORE KISS for this album, we’d probably have tossed it out. It’s not that we’re intentionally eliminating anything pop, but more than that, it’s because we prioritised our desire to do things that we’ve never done before for this album. And when I think of totality, that song comes to mind, so that’s just it.

―― Ahh, I see. By the way, how did the recording work itself go? The sense of fulfillment after completion seems to be quite high, though.

T: But it was tiring (lol). Because, so far, the rhythm portion has always been the very first thing to be recorded, right? But this time, even though we’ve started tracking the music, we were still recording the rhythms (lol).

―― That’s because there were songs that were handed in quite late, right (lol).

T: Because Imai is a slow starter (lol).

―― How was it compared to the last time?

T: It’s the first time that things dragged on so long.

―― Won’t it mess up the pace? Your own too.

T: Even if it would, there’s nothing we could do about it, right? Besides, we’ve even posted the ads (lol). When I saw it, I thought, “It’s going on sale sometime in May. Can we make it?” (lol). At first, when we finished recording 11 or 12 songs, I thought, “Ah, I guess that’s all of it.” But then, Imai said something like, “I’m working on 2 songs.” But I guess he wanted to keep working on it until he was satisfied. You know…… It happens all the time, but we were told that the manufacturer was waiting for us. They stopped production.

―― (Lol) Amazing. A band that stops even the factories.

T: Hahahaha.

―― But is this recent pace of releases ideal for BUCK-TICK? For Japan, it’s come to a point where the average is to release one album a year. Compared to that, you’re taking a little bit more time, though.

T: But that, you know, is because it’s business, right? Releasing something every year. So, thanks to this, my annual income has been cut in half (lol). Because we didn’t release anything last year too. …… Kukukuk. We’re poor (lol). I was shocked when I filed my tax return. Like, “I can only save this little.” (Lol). That’s why, from a business point of view, I’d like to push something out every half a year or so (lol). But, you know…… In the end, it’s unrelated, isn’t it? [Music and] whether it makes business sense or not.

 

 

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Direct Dialogue — Hisashi Imai vs Dai Onojima

The controversy over Uta finally comes to an end!!

Mr Onojima’s criticism of Uta from 2 issues ago caused quite a stir, prompting Mr Okamoto and Mr Ohno to bring a re-examination of the song in the last issue, but I believe, in the end, to truly settle this controversy, we had to wait for composer Hisashi Imai to make an appearance after all.
In this article, Imai shows up to answer Mr Onojima’s questions about Uta and Six/Niɴe as well.

How will he counter Mr Onojima’s scathing comments?

Uta was written in the spur of a moment. It’s only natural that there would be split opinions, but that’s fine.
I’ve come to feel a lack of freedom with the format that we’ve done our songs in thus far, because you can see already where we’re heading with it.

Back in the March issue, I wrote a rather critical review of BUCK-TICK’s single Uta/Kimi e. There were a lot of responses to it including those from the band members, so this article was written to ask them, especially Hisashi Imai, the one who leads the band in their sound direction, for their counterarguments and their creative intentions.

However, since that article was written back when I had only listened to the single, the criticism I wrote was only focused on that song in the single, so now that the album is complete and Uta has now taken its rightful place in it as one of the tracks, it doesn’t make sense for us to continue discussing just that one song. And so here, we will be looking at the overall album concept and flow, which includes Uta.

The very first thing I can conclude is, Hisashi Imai is Hisashi Imai after all. “No matter what critics may say, I will do what I want to do and when it results in something that I’m proud of, I don’t particularly care about criticism or anything like that.” That is what Imai said in a nutshell. He truly is a man who goes his own way. And that’s fine. He makes music. I talk about music. Those are the things we have to do in our respective professions.

First, we started talking about the production concept of the single Uta.

“With that guitar riff, the song was quickly finished. I wrote it without thinking too hard. We chose to feature this song as the single because it’s been quite a while [since our last release], and we thought that it would perplex listeners especially because it’s a song that sounded like a chorus without a chorus, something unlike anything we had ever done before. I think it’s only natural that there would be split opinions about this song. Like some may get surprised or wonder, ‘Uhー what’s this?’. But that’s fine, I don’t really care.”

In other words, not only did he, to a certain extent, expect criticism like mine, he is also saying that he made a controversial piece of work that was bound to stir up discussions. Regarding my comments about how the imbalance between the singing and the music was a problem, this was what he said.

“Even now, we’ve got heavy-sounding songs like Deep Slow and Ao no Sekai anyway. So I don’t like it when people tell me that. Because we’ve put in the effort to make sure that these songs won’t sound like that too. But, well, I guess what will be will be. It’s just the kind of song it is anyway.”

That is to say Imai means that he doesn’t want the verdict of whether his music is good or not to come from people who received a sample CD for free, people like me. He clearly states that the only people who are qualified to judge his music are “those who spent their own money to buy the CDs”.  Then, I asked whether he meant that his music should only be judged by record sales, he answered, “Well, yes. Because all kinds of people will be listening to it.” It appears that his reasoning is that the assessment of music is based on personal subjectivity, and the only objective standard is record sales. But it doesn’t mean that good music will definitely sell, nor does sellable music necessarily equate to good music.

Next, the production concept of the album.

“So far, we have had concepts that could be described as ‘heavy’ or ‘dark’ and so on, but I didn’t want to make something around those concepts this time. I wanted [the album] to give the feeling that something else had escaped, like an additional something to the music that BUCK-TICK has been making thus far or something. The feeling that you can see where we’re heading with the style that we’ve had until now. In other words, I’ve come to feel a lack of freedom with the standard format of songs which start with an introduction, followed by the verse, then the chorus, and a guitar solo, and so on.”

I suppose this means that the BUCK-TICK sound that they have established thus far has turned into something that is no longer inspiring to Imai. That’s why their new album is actually a collection of different types of songs with a variety of arrangements. There are songs like Uta too, which are heavy yet are in no way one-dimensional. It’s a good thing, but rather than giving me the impression that [the album] “holds a rich variety”, it feels more like an album that shows the difficulties of using trial and error instead. To that extent, I don’t get the same power of completeness that darker than darkness has from this album, neither do I sense anything close to a deep conviction. Instead, all I get is the feeling that it is still on the way to completion, with songs that sound like ambient techno that, depending on how you listen to them, feel diffusive and out of focus.

“I wonder. I wanted to include a variety of songs, and I sure did include them. But I didn’t want [the album] to feel frivolous, like we simply tried to put different songs together. Yet, on the other hand, I thought it’d be very risky for us to fill up the album purely with songs like Uta.”

Following his experience with Shaft and other external projects, I think the horizons of Imai’s own creative appetite has grown all of a sudden. Imai, who had only known nothing but the band that is BUCK-TICK until recently, has started to possess an urge to express music beyond the category of BUCK-TICK. And as a result, perhaps a gap has appeared between the things he wanted to express and the band’s range of allowance. To put it differently, therein lies the question of how he can turn what he wants to do into reality with the present band. These troubles are now more clearly visible than ever before.

“Right. So how are we going to execute what we want to do together as a band of 5? But it’s also not as if it’s impossible to perform this song without being in a band.”

However, there is one thing I’m uncertain about regarding his reason for being so particular about doing things in a band and as a band. Let’s say, even if drums and bass guitar were excluded depending on the song, while guitars and vocals were taken depending on the occasion, BUCK-TICK is still BUCK-TICK and this doesn’t diminish the importance of each member or their unity. Somehow, although the things he wants to do have long since gone beyond the restrictive category of bands, he’s giving me the impression that deliberately forcing himself to squeeze into that small frame.

Imai himself says that he believes that his band mates understands his intentions. 100%. But I’m under the impression that apparently, communication with his bandmates wasn’t always smooth this time around. It feels to me that as a result, this shows in the vocals-music balance in Uta, in the album’s overall unfocused ambiguity, in how conspicuous it is that the album is the aftermath of ups and downs, and all these things. I do wonder whether Imai had no choice but to stick to his insistence of the “format” of a band because there wasn’t enough mutual communication involved. Or perhaps, this opinion is just a little too farfetched.

After I wrote my review of Uta, I had hoped that I would change my assessment of it after listening to the album. But honestly speaking, even after I’ve now heard what Imai had to say, the murky feeling I’ve got hasn’t disappeared. I think there’s no one who praised Kurutta Taiyou, Koroshi no Shirabe, and darker~ more than me. However, when I listened to this new release, it did not hit me with an impact that got me feeling, “Amazing! They’ve won me over!” or a freshness that made my heart throb like those albums did. Those albums had a monstrous power, asense of unity that forcefully pins the listener into a corner without leaving room for negotiation. I suppose it can be said that I was overwhelmed by the immensity of their talent which grew with every new album they released.

However, even if this time’s BUCK-TICK release was “hard work”, I cannot say that it was their “best work”. Perhaps, BUCK-TICK are now at a critical juncture in their career. At least, that’s how I feel.

 

 

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Translation: Yoshiyuki
Scans: Endless Dei (@DeiEndless on Twitter)

 

Related articles:

[Apr 1995] Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll: Review of BUCK-TICK’s Uta/Kimi e Single

[Jul 1995] Pati-Pati Rock ‘n’ Roll: Part 2 of Atsushi Sakurai’s interview

【Interview】BUCK-TICK’s 22nd Album, ABRACADABRA

BARKS.jp
18 September 2020

Interview/text: Tae Omae

 

 

Acceptance and affirmation for everything in life, for everyone who wishes to live as they are

BUCK-TICK will be releasing their 22nd album ABRACADABRA on Monday, September 21; the 33rd anniversary of their career. Eureka, the vibrant rock and roll number which was released ahead of time is an anthem which repeatedly calls out “LOVE!” in celebration of life. That alone has more than powerful enough to open up a wind tunnel in these melancholy times, but the true magnificence of BUCK-TICK is found in the jet black parade of Boukyaku (忘却 / Oblivion) which closes off the world of this album. This is an all-encompassing affirmation and acceptance of every facet of life; not just the hopes and delights and thrills and joys, but also the nightmares and pain and sadness and remorse. So, how did they create this album, which seems like an amulet for all those who wish to live as they are to keep close to?   This we ask vocalist Sakurai Atsushi and guitarist Imai Hisashi.

 

 

■ “A slightly deviant vibe” or something edgy
■ I thought of aiming for the essence of something like that

 

―― Listening to ABRACADABRA, the album was beautiful and it felt like something I would use as an omamori¹ in dark and depressing times; like a safety net for the heart. When did you start work on this album? And how did it progress?

Imai Hisashi (I): Probably last Autumn?   I started writing music around spring, and that’s when it started, I suppose.

―― Was that around the time when COVID-19 brought about the mood of voluntary restraint?   Or earlier than that?

I: Earlier than that.

―― Did you already have a general concept or vision for the album at the time?

I: When I was composing, I personally had something in mind. Like, “a slightly deviant vibe“. For some reason I kept coming back to the thought of aiming for the essence of something that’s kind of edgy, or something along those lines. But even if that’s what I’m aiming for, it doesn’t mean that I want to force my way there no matter what. It’s fine to stray away from it a little too. Well, but it wasn’t all that much of a concept anyway.

―― I feel that for over 30 years, everyone in BUCK-TICK has always deviated from the norm in the sense that you’ve always created works that do not fit the mold. So were you thinking of something different this time too?

I: I’m pretty sure I did because otherwise, I wouldn’t get the feeling myself that “I want to try and put that into words”.

―― This vision of “something deviant”, how exactly was it reflected in your work?   Were there any aspects of songwriting that were considered out of the ordinary for you?

I: No, there was none of that in particular. Simply put, deviant refers to things like “no pandering”, and the like. Although, now I’m wondering whether I’ve mentioned that side of things before.

―― Do you mean that you won’t consider doing things that are derived from the consideration of what the general audience would like, and these sorts of ‘services’?

I: That’s right. Basically, as long as we think it’s good, we’d go ahead with it as it is. I feel that the initial spark came from those really small things and it eventually grew into my motivation.

『ABRACADABRA』【First Press Limited Edition】

―― This vision that Imai-san held from the very beginning, at what stage was it first shared with Sakurai-san?

Sakurai Atsushi (S): No, he didn’t at all.

I: I didn’t say anything.

S: …… I didn’t ask (smiles).

―― (Smiles). So, you were sort of just watching the music get written?

S: That’s right.

―― When did you start aligning your awareness with each other?

I: I think it’s better if we don’t have to say things to each other like, “Like this.” Once it’s said, the other party would get stuck there and even if he thought that something isn’t quite right with doing it “like this”, he wouldn’t tell me that. Though, well, he usually doesn’t really say anything to me anyway.

―― I see. Aside from the previously released singles², what was the first song that was written for the album?

I: The first ones were probably MOONLIGHT ESCAPE and Datenshi.

―― Those became singles in the end and for Datenshi, you have another version recorded, right?

I: That’s right.

Imai Hisashi

―― In the beginning [of the album], you start with the sound effects (SE) track PEACE, followed by Que Sera Sera Elegy, URAHARA-JUKU, and SOPHIA DREAM; a group of psychedelically textured songs with a strong electronic-feeling and a crisp audio impression comes one after another, but did those come about much later?

I: That’s right. After we made MOONLIGHT ESCAPE and Datenshi, those 3 are the songs that were composed right after I entered yet another creative period.

―― How did this album’s production and recording schedule get affected by COVID-19?

I: Recording was suspended. For about a month?

―― How did you feel during that period?

I: I guess, as you’d expect, you could say that things gradually grew dark. Because I was in such a bad mood, it was then when I wrote Eureka.

―― That’s the song which was released ahead of time, right? Was that unconditional strength and bright energy linked to your own desire to break past that stifling situation?

I: Yeah, I think so. Actually, I wrote a song with a much heavier guitar riff during that period, but I gradually grew sick of that gloomy feeling. And I thought, “It’s been a while since I wrote a song like Eureka. Maybe I should try that?”

―― Eureka’s lyrics even have the word ABRACADABRA, the album’s title. Did this word appear in Imai-san’s mind at the stage of this song’s creation?   Or did that come from Sakurai-san?

I: That’s right. It was from Sakurai-san that the word appeared in the lyrics.

―― Well, then, I’ll direct the question about how the word “ABRACADABRA” came about to Sakurai-san. But first, can you tell us how you felt about the situation where you had to suspend your work as a result of COVID-19?

S: For me, I had the lyrics of 1 or 2 songs to write so I was focused on that. Well, with the feeling that there’s no other option but to behave myself. While still not really understanding why…… It still applies even now, but without exaggerating it, [I had a sense of] “we should protect each other’s lives first”. Because no matter what, the studio was going to be sealed off anyway, and it’s [a place where it’s] difficult to get ventilation too. And after the state of emergency was announced, it’s like everyone stayed home to “protect themselves”.

―― How did you feel at the time?

S: I was a bit scared. Because there was this realisation slowly dawning on me that “this doesn’t only affect other people.” My mood was also definitely…… Well, then again, I’m always depressed³ to begin with (smiles).

I: (Smiles).

Sakurai Atsushi

―― (Smiles). So, it felt like [the situation] just made it worse?

S: Yes, I was depressed³ (smiles).

―― So, how did the word “ABRACADABRA” catch your eye in that situation?

S: When we had to stop recording, I was left with the lyrics to Eureka to write, and I had a lot of time to do that, about a month, so that’s what I did in that period of time. Right at the start, Imai-san had decided that the chorus was to be in English, so I had to think about whether there was any way to ride on that well while still making it “me”. I went to read various books and widened my horizons, and watched movies and all that too. While doing all that, when I opened up the web for some reason to have a look, it felt as if [the word] just came towards me.

―― Huh!   So, you just grabbed it like, “This is the one!” and reeled in it?

S: That’s right. So, while I was doing that legwork, I meant to increase the reach of my antenna to capture a wider variety of things, so that was how the word approached me.

―― For Imai-san’s part of the lyrics where you shout “LOVE!” over and over, did it reflect your mood at the time just like the music?

I: Yes, that’s right. It naturally turned out like that when I composed it so I thought it’d be fine to just leave the chorus as it is.

―― It’s very strong, isn’t it? This loving ode to life. I was overwhelmed by the inexplicable energy. Was it in part to fire yourself up?

I: When I was composing it, I did find myself thinking that this was what I wanted right now. It really just flowed naturally. After all, I did get the sense that I was feeling low. There was also anger over the suspension of recording, but honestly, I also felt reluctant about going to the studio. I didn’t really want to go.

―― There’s also the worry that you’d get infected and all of that, right?

I: Yeah. All those various things built on each other and it was with that drift that this song came about.

―― Aside from the pause in production affecting this album in reality, I wanted to ask how much of it was also influenced by the climate of these present times, but can I assume that it is quite strongly reflected in this album?

I: I think there more or less has an influence, as per usual. Because all these things are happening here and in reality.

―― What about Sakurai-san?   How much does the mood or climate of these times influence your lyrics, or perhaps, your singing?

S: I guess you could say that from the time I started working on the single last year, I didn’t want to let COVID-19 get in the way of our work until recording got suspended. So, I’d at least be careful in real life, but the album is, after all, something that I work on in my room and my own time and in my own head, and because I didn’t want something so incomprehensible to interrupt me to that extent, I purely wrote what I wanted to write. It’s a bit different for Eureka, though.

―― So, rather than writing about the goings-on in society, you dug into what was within you to try and write at your usual pace?

S: Much of it used to come from the imaginings in my head in the past, but in comparison to that, this time, [what I wrote] before COVID-19, say for example, MOONLIGHT ESCAPE  was about child abuse, and so on. With regards to those topics, I would write about a way out, or say something like, “It’s okay to run away.” Then, in Villain, it’s about the darkness of humanity. Like those who are usually all smiles but once they go online, they get all egoistical⁴ and repeatedly slander others anonymously. But [what this song is saying is], “I know all about that side of you!”. Also, the song where suicide turned into it’s subject…… (Kogoeru). It happened to overlap to the period of time when there was a report on TV about those who took their own lives, but I wrote it way before that. It makes me feel sorry about that for some reason, though……

―― But it was a coincidence.

S: Yes. But at the same time, one of those things which I’ve been wanting to write about for a long time now is “the fact that such a way of life exists in reality”.

―― No matter the subject matter in Sakurai-san’s lyrics, there’s always an open-minded take towards the idea that “it’s okay to run away”. I think it’s very kind of you to not at all put any blame on those who come to that decision.

S: No, not at all. I’m just being kind to myself (smiles).

―― But I think that this is exactly why [your music] becomes a safety net for those who have fallen into a state where their thoughts consume them, right? Do you also wish that [it’s alright to choose to run away]?

S: Yes. Because I, too, couldn’t run away no matter how much I wanted to. There are a lot of people who were in that situation in their childhood too. While we keep getting told to, “Be a man,” or “Think positive”, I believe there are definitely people who aren’t good at those things. To those people, [I want to say] something like, “It’s okay to be yourself. It’s okay to be whatever feels natural to you.” That’s why there’s also a part [of me that hopes] that maybe [this] can bring a small breath of relief to those who have negative thoughts.

―― Rather than small, I’d think it’ll be a huge relief to them. I do feel that society is filled with an atmosphere which suggests that weakness and darkness is unacceptable, and to add to that, we live in an era where the attacks are all aimed at those who are just hurting, like how you’ve depicted it in Villain. I feel that [this album] is an omamori¹ for them.

S: I’m glad to hear that.

 

■ My obsession with life is very strong, perhaps even twice as strong as a regular person’s
■ It is because we have that greed that we grow tired

 

―― Going back to the topic of the order of songwriting, MOONLIGHT ESCAPE and Datenshi were written, and following those, was Eureka the next one to be composed?

I: This time, Eureka was the last of all to be written.

―― Look at the album on the whole, I could sense the meaning behind the narrative of it with how you raised the curtains with Que Sera Sera Elegy’s “This is the start of an illusion” ⁵, and ended with Eureka’s “I’ll get rid of everything and make it all disappear” ⁶. The message I got from it is that everything in life is all an illusion, and that’s precisely why we should enjoy it as we please. But  Boukyaku (Oblivion / 忘却) comes in at the very end, bringing with it an air of indescribable impermanence. Although it was surprising that the album did not end with Eureka, it was satisfying. Did this song order come about naturally?

I: Nope. When it came to the song order, we were stuck on which of those 2 songs was better for us to end the album with and there were a lot of different opinions about it. But I do think that this form [that we’ve decided on] is really beautiful.

―― Which song did Imai-san back?

I: In the beginning, I backed Boukyaku but at the end, I was like, “As expected……”. Should I speak for the notion of making Eureka the last song?   That thought crossed my mind. I did feel that it’s definitely this one after all, though.

―― How about Sakurai-san?

S: We managed to decide on the song order with director Tanaka (Junichi)’s input as well, but Tanaka-san helped us take a good look at all of it from a bird’s-eye view so he gave us the idea for the first song when he said, “What about Que Sera Sera Elegy?”. He was like an eye-opener; as if he was removing the scales from our eyes. So, when we were trying to decide between Eureka or Boukyaku for the last song, he decided to betray Imai-san, you know? He said something like, “Put Eureka last” (smiles).

I: (Smiles).

『ABRACADABRA』【Limited Edition Vinyl】

―― Were you at it until the very last minute?

S: Yes (smiles). Imai-san and our manipulator Yokoyama (Kazutoshi)-kun planned to put Eureka last and have it link back to the first SE track Peace. But me and U-ta (Higuchi Yutaka / bassist) kept whining, “But this is better~”.

I: But I wanted you both to convince me too (smiles). Like, say, “This is better!”

S: Ahaha!

―― (Smiles). So, everyone was insidiously pestered by Sakurai-san and U-ta-san and eventually this is how it turned out.

S: Yeah. All while saying, “You traitor!” (smiles).

I: Towards U-ta, too, I kept thinking, “Tell us more firmly!” But it felt like U-ta couldn’t say it at all (smiles).

S: Exactly. Because he has no support (smiles).

Higuchi Yutaka

―― You actually wanted him to explain the reasoning behind his recommendation, right (smiles). But even though he didn’t have the words for it, he decided to make you change your mind with his passion.

I: That’s right. But, well, I really feel that this was the better choice (lol).

S: Ahaha!

―― Sakurai-san is laughing at you…… (smiles).

I: For me, I’m just the kind of person who has those very complicated feelings (smiles), but I guess I wanted to mention again the feeling of linking [the final song] back to SE Peace. Because the track Peace itself is a song that was made from the deconstruction of Eureka.

―― Oh, is that so!

I: That’s why I’d think, “Doesn’t it fit nicely?”

―― Making the album end brightly and then cycle back to the beginning. That’s one possible form in itself too, isn’t it? But I feel that the darkness, the rainy mood, and the afterglow of Boukyaku wonderfully turns the overall flow into one that says, “This is the BUCK-TICK World!” With regards to the lyrics of Boukyaku, when did you write them and what thoughts did you have in mind?

S: I think it just so happened that we finished the vocal recording for this song a mere couple of days before the state of emergency was declared. So, I guess it was definitely during a time when I, too, felt that atmosphere around us where the world and even Japan was gradually getting invaded by anxiety. But I’ve always had the notion that, “I want to write about this feeling.” Although, I don’t really know myself whether this came about because I was being influenced by the vibes around me or if it was just a coincidence. Well, I guess it’s a bit of both. Everyone, and myself included, of course, have had a lot of different encounters and experienced many other farewells too. But while those bring both joys and sadness in their own ways, it’s just how things naturally go, isn’t it? At least, that’s how I hope I’ll be able to think one day. That’s the kind of topic I wanted to write about.

―― Is this coming from an observer’s point of view? Or the perspective of your future self looking back on the current you in this time period?

S: Hm…… Perhaps. It’s one of my usual themes, though. Like, returning to the earth⁷ or returning to the womb⁷. We get born into this world, but there’s a sense of, “So many things have happened, haven’t they? And now you’re tired, aren’t you? Well, then, let’s go home.” I just think it’d be nice if that’s the kind of story I can tell.

―― In track 5, Tsuki no Sabaku (Moon Desert), you’ve written “Until we turn to bones   Until we turn to ashes” ⁸; a description which appears to make us think about our afterlife even after we’ve decomposed. Isn’t there something similar to an attachment to life implied in there?

S: No, it’s quite strong there. On the other hand, it is because we have that greed [for life] that we grow tired. I guess, maybe my obsession with life is very strong, perhaps even twice as strong as a regular person’s.

―― So, is that why when you feel “pain” while living your life, you’d accept that you’d feel “tired” or want to run away or take a rest and allow yourself to feel down?

S: Yeah. It’s like I’m telling myself that. Although I think that it’d be nice if everyone would have a listen and feel it in different ways.

―― I see…… It permeates every word [you write]. Boukyaku is a beautiful, wistful, melancholic ballad, but it’s something special to Imai-san too, right?

I: That’s right. When I was composing it, I felt that I’ve written a good one.

―― Only Imai-san can write this melody line, right?

I: That’s not true, though (smiles).

―― When you were writing this song, did Imai-san have any scenes in mind?

I: I wonder…… I didn’t have any of that in particular. Instead, I was thinking of writing a gentle song, or something like that.

―― Next, I’d like to ask about two other songs which upon the song title announcement had me excited and wondering what they would be like. Maimu Mime (Dancing Dreaming Mime / 舞夢マイム)  and Dance Tengoku (Dance Heaven / ダンス天国).  How did this series of “dance” songs come about?

I: For Maimu Mime, I had the notion of wanting to create something that sounds like a popular song from the past. When it was done, I thought, “Ah, this is already perfect for Sakurai-san’s signature worldview.” (Smiles). I got the feeling that this is where the song came from.

―― A song where one person plays the roles of both the man and the woman at the same time. It’s an explosion of Sakurai-san’s world, isn’t it?

I: No, I didn’t know exactly how it was going to turn out, though (smiles). I was looking forward to seeing what lyrics he’d come up with for this song.

―― When Sakurai-san first heard Maimu Mime, what impression did you get, and what kind of lyrics did it make you think of writing?

S: It felt like “a popular Showa-era song” and at first impression, I already decided, “Let’s keep it that way.” A lot of different scenes came to mind, like the sloppy conversations between men and women at a karaoke (smiles), and the atmosphere of Shinjuku, and so on.

―― It certainly creates the mood of an obscene and degenerate city, doesn’t it?

S: I wanted to make it a song that sounded as if it was born of Shinjuku, as if it came from that sort of world. Such a world has sorrow, the stylish backs of nihilistic men, the men and women who grow tougher and tougher…… I thought it would be good if I could build such a world from top to bottom.

―― When you’re writing song lyrics from the perspective of both a man and a woman, does Sakurai-san have certain characters in mind to draw from?   For example, someone around this age, or someone with this attribute, and so on.

S: That I do have.

―― So, the profiles of these two in the lyrics…… Ah, but it might be rude to ask.

S: I think it’d be more fun to let people imagine that part for themselves after all. Rather than having me reveal, “they’re between their late 20s and late 30s…” and so on and so forth, it’s better if [listeners] create these characters for themselves (smiles).

―― My heart skipped a beat when they said these terrible things like, “Shall we try dying” ⁹ so carelessly.

S: It sure gives the song a touch of Showa-era dramaturgy, doesn’t it (smiles).

―― Dance Tengoku is Hoshino (Hidehiko)-san’s song. What did you think about this song?

S: This song is one that Hide (Hoshino Hidehiko) wanted to do with a kind of “Here’s me knowing about avant garde too!” and that’s also evident here (smiles). I thought maybe it’d be good for the lyrics to ride on that too. This one belongs to the Showa world too.

―― This doesn’t sound like it’s Shinjuku, is it?

S: Well, this is [set] in Mishima Yukio’s Confessions of a Mask¹⁰. Like, in the final scene, the male protagonist becomes euphoric at the sight of a rugged man’s body.

―― I see. There’s a phrase that goes “Be it woman   Be it man   It doesn’t matter” ¹¹ which gives me the feeling that it’s a free world which breaks down traditional values, but in the case of Confessions of a Mask……

S: Yeah. This is a modern-day…… How should I say this?   There are all kinds of men and women so rather than discriminating them, I was hoping that [this song] would give them a sort of upbeat feeling, like “It doesn’t matter whichever way you go. Let’s just dance and have fun!”

―― This is an up-to-date LGBT perspective, isn’t it? Completely different from the gender view in Maimu Mime.

S: That’s right.

Hoshino Hidehiko

 

―― And the methods of depiction in Que Sera Sera Elegy, URAHARA-JUKU, and SOPHIA DREAM are all different but I’m getting the impression that the common motif present in all of them is the hallucinatory experience. I had all sorts interpretations, for example, was SOPHIA DREAM part of the world of Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds (The beatles)? And so on. Imai-san wrote the lyrics to Que Sera Sera Elegy and SOPHIA DREAM so what did you think of?

I: For SOPHIA DREAM, right from the start I already had the intention of making sure the words “SOPHIA DREAM” alone would make up the crux of the song. So, that’s where I started [the lyric writing process] to somehow make the whole thing feel fictional while looking down on this world from up above.

―― A young girl looking down from the sky; is that image similar to the album jacket’s artwork?

I: Yeah, probably. That’s the kind of picture or rather, image I had in mind.

―― What about Que Sera Sera Elegy?

I: For this song, words which matched the the melody somehow come to me at the same time while I was composing it so I decided, “I’ll compose and write at the same time as far as I can.” That’s how I ended up writing it and this is what it turned into in the end.

―― Is it rare that both the music and the lyrics come to you at the same time?

I: That in itself isn’t all that rare, though. Also, I guess you could say that the A-melody was more like a rap so, I suppose it’d be quite the hurdle for Sakurai-san to “put words to this” rhythm even if I asked him to after all.

―― So this is because you felt that it’d be difficult.

I: Yeah. Because I also felt that it might feel unnatural no matter what other words were applied to it. That’s why I thought of doing it myself right from the start.

―― When it comes to such a song, you won’t let Sakurai-san listen to it until it’s done?

I: No, not really. Even when I get to a point when I’m wondering, “What should I do with the lyrics?”, in the end, I might decide, “I should ask him to write it after all,” but there are also times when I’d decide, “I think I’ll write it after all.”

―― So, it depends case by case. URAHARA-JUKU’s lyrics are by Sakurai-san, so how did those come about?   These lyrics bring up scenes of youths put in danger, though.

Yagami Toll

S: For this song, I’ve moved from Shinjuku to Harajuku (smiles). It’s a poppy and glittery place for the kids but I think it’s dangerous to yearn for such places blindly. This came from the impulsive anger that I, too, felt when a young girl’s abduction and captivity was being reported in the news. I wanted to tell the story of a girl who does various things…… even selling her body. Ultimately, the song is saying, “But you should be careful.” Only you can protect yourself.

―― A warning.

S: That’s right. In the end, the girl pushes the bad guy away in Omotesando. To let him get struck by a car.

―― She fights back properly.

S: But it’s like, “You go home and sleep. I’ll take the rap” (smiles). That’s the kind of story it is.

―― This time, you’ve included different versions of a few previously- released songs. There is Cube Juice-san’s Kogoeru Crystal CUBE ver. (Kogoeru is the B-side to the previously released single, MOONLIGHT ESCAPE) where he handled the manipulations, and Kemonotachi no Yoru YOW-ROW ver. and Datenshi YOW-ROW ver. Only these songs had names attached to their titles, but I thought it was unusual. I think it would’ve been fine for them to be recorded as album versions without any additional notes, but why did you choose to name them like this?

I: I guess…… I thought it’d be complicated if we were to just bring the titles across like that. Like, if we do that, it’ll give people all sorts of impressions [based on the title alone].

―― Do you mean that naming the songs with an adjective like, “〇〇~ Electria ver.” would limit their imaginations?

I: Exactly. That’s why, even if we were to name it in a way that says, “This is what it is,” and highlight it, for example, simply stating that what YOW-ROW made is YOW-ROW’s arrangement, there will also be those who say, “Is his name enough?” And also it’s honestly a pain in the ass to think about every single track as a mix or something like that (smiles).

―― (Smiles). Because that person’s arrangement is something unique too, and it doesn’t need any other adjectives to describe it, right? It also got me wondering if you’re treating them like family because it was quite impactful to look at the list of songs and see names aside from the band members’.

I: Ahh, that’s because we’ve been enjoying having them work on a variety of things for us over the past few years.

―― So there were no qualms about putting their names there?

I: Yes, that’s right.

 

■ Although it’s probably impossible create a “tour mood” with the film concert
■ I’m happy if it gives them an excuse to come all dressed up, and make it as unordinary¹⁴ as possible

 

―― I was surprised by your unusual decision to release this album in all formats available. You’ll be releasing your first vinyl record in about 22 years and your first cassette tape in about 28 years in addition to a CD, high-resolution streaming, and even download/streaming services. What are your thoughts regarding this?

S: I didn’t think anything of it in the beginning (smiles). I thought we were going to release it normally in CD format. Regarding the vinyl record, it came about because designer Akita (Kazvnori)¹² who thought of expressing [the design] with a large jacket. To date, there were a few times when he has given us LP-sized photographs when we didn’t have anything of that size, and there was once when he helped us out when we did. But this time, too, he gave it to us in this form.

―― We can enjoy it in high-resolution sound quality and yet at the same time, there’s a cassette tape version too. It sure is nice for the recipients to freely choose whether they want to enjoy [the album] through state-of-the-art technology or through a nostalgic item.

S: It was Imai-san who said he wanted to release a cassette tape. Cassette tape specialty shops are gradually growing in number these days, and record stores are still around too, right? I think that these are things that those who still love such items can enjoy after all. But I don’t have a player that can play this time’s LP, though (smiles).

―― And this is where the BUCK-TICK portable vinyl player comes in, right (smiles). And it’s still getting a flood of pre-orders. Is Imai-san particular when it comes to cassette tapes?

I: On occasion, I catch word that cassettes are becoming a serious fad. I think kids these days know nothing about cassettes. But I guess it’s fun to have it as an item anyway, and they look like they’re having fun to me. That’s how it really was in the beginning, right? That’s why during the meeting, I thought, “I guess I’ll just mention it.” (Smiles).

―― As the main composer, how does Imai-san feel about the high-resolution versions?

I: When I had the chance to listen to it in the studio, I thought that it was really great in terms of sound quality.

―― There is a lot of audio information in BUCK-TICK’s works in recent years so there’s always a discovery where I notice that there’s another sound after listening to it a number of times. I’ve had the opportunity to listen and compare, and I thought that being able to listen in high resolution suits both the characteristics of the music and the needs of the listener.

I: Yeah, I think so too.

『ABRACADABRA』【Limited Edition Cassette Tape】

 

<BUCK-TICK Portable Vinyl Player>
<BUCK-TICK Portable Cassette Tape Player>

―― And it appears that the orders are flooding in for pre-orders of the BUCK-TICK vinyl record player and cassette tape player which were also designed by Akita-san. Those are attractive items that definitely get people thinking, “I definitely want it!”

I: That’s right. I want them myself (lol).

―― Although there are enthusiasts, this is an attempt to create an attachment to the music players of the previous era which are generally getting used less and less. There’s a trend in the world where everything is becoming more and more data-driven, and I think this is a wonderful antithesis to that.

I: Indeed, I think that’s true.

―― I’m wondering whether this is fundamentally linked to your holding of the film concert tour. How did it come about? This form of pre-recording a live and then screening them in various concert halls around the country?

I: We first found ourselves in a situation where we could no longer go on tour and we started wondering, “What should we do?” Since it’s no longer possible for humans to to actually travel to each location at that stage, this was the only option we had. We just decided that we’d do our best and hold a tour the best way we can.

―― I think you could’ve chosen to not to do a tour that uses live venues but instead, for example, held a live with everyone in Tokyo with everyone and then streamed it, or something like that. I wanted to ask what was your main reason for not doing so, and what you had in mind [when coming to this decision].

I: That’s, that, isn’t it?   Grown-up problems¹³…… (smiles).

―― So, basically, it’s too late to cancel it (smiles). That’s a given, and it can’t be helped after all. In a worst case scenario, if an artist only performs and talks alone in their own room  to stream, it would be difficult for them to continue their activities, right? I suppose it could be said that even if it’s just in the form of a recording, giving people the opportunity to go to a live show and actually go to live venues at each location also creates jobs for the staff and other related persons. I had the feeling that perhaps the decision to do this film concert tour isn’t only about yourselves, but also considers the future of the team on the whole. What do you think?

I: I think in terms of how we’re going to do it in future, I guess you could say that this is one way or something like that. Of course, you could say that live broadcasts can reach everyone without barrier, and it can reach everywhere all in one go. But this tour came about because we’re in this situation, and I guess we want to try out a variety of methods. I guess that’s what it is, I think.

―― What about Sakurai-san? What do you think about your tour taking this film concert tour type of shape?

S: We heard about the event organisers’ situation from them, and when we asked, “What is the best way for us to go about this?”, what they suggested to us was this film concert tour. In the end, it’s certainly not possible for us to travel to each location, so at the very least, we’ll let our staff work but with sufficient measures to prevent infection, of course. And we also provided information to encourage visitors to the venues to take extra care. I think we were able to do it in a better form, as close to best as possible. Although it might be a little impossible to let everyone who is coming to the venue feel the “tour mood”, they can still come to the venue all dressed up. I’ll be glad if we can make it as unordinary¹⁴ as possible for them.

―― Preparing for the day ahead of time, leaving home to go to the venue and meet your friends, talking about the live show on the way home…… All of these have become difficult to do now, but all the time spent going through this series of these unordinary¹⁴ events is part of the joys of going to a live show, isn’t it?

S: That’s right. I’d like to let them have a taste of that feeling even if just a little. Although it’s a little frustrating for us that we can’t go to each location.

―― Is there only one recording for this film concert tour?

I: Yes, we’re already done. With a setlist made for the film concert.

―― On Monday, September 21, the anniversary of your debut, you will be holding your first no-audience, live online broadcast concert called ABRACADABRA LIVE ON THE NET. Is the content for this completely different from the film concert?

I: We’re performing the new songs for both events, but everything else is completely different.

―― I believe this no-audience, live online broadcast concert was decided because the members had a strong desire to do this. How did you come to this decision?

I: When everyone gathered for a meeting regarding the film concert, we already had the desire to do a live broadcast, so we suggested it there and then.

―― I see. So you’ve been thinking about the two sides of this and the film concert from the very beginning.

I: Yes. We solidified it from there.

―― What does Sakurai-san think about the no-audience, live online broadcast concert?

S: If there are people who tell us, “We want to see it,” then there’s no reason for us to not do it any more, is there? Even for the recording of the film concert, I thought, “I don’t know if I’d be able to muster up this much energy when there’s no audience……”. I just feel that I receive a lot of energy from the audience when we do concerts with an audience.

―― It made you notice the irony of it.

S: That’s right. The cheers and the applause and the eye contact. I was reminded that these were what inspired me to get up on stage.

―― Speaking of no-audience live concerts, you had experience in it with SATELLITE CIRCUIT in 1991, right?   A groundbreaking experiment in the early days of satellite broadcasting, it was held as a centerpiece event to commemorate the inauguration of WOWOW, and was broadcast live across the country.

I: That’s right, yes.

―― Do you still remember how you felt at the time when you took on this challenge? And how you felt watching it after it ended?

I: Personally, I had fun doing it. That’s why I wonder if that feeling will resurface again this time.   That said, honestly…… I did find myself wondering which [camera] is it (smiles).

―― What does Sakurai-san remember about it?

S: Uhh…… Sorry, I thought, “That’s bland.” (Smiles).

―― (Smiles). Something’s missing if you’re not standing before an audience?

S: That’s definitely it. Where to look, what to say…… I was even wondering whether an MC was even necessary. But even now I’m being told that the MC I gave back then was out of context (smiles).

I: (Smiles).

―― It was a legendary MC, wasn’t it (smiles). Do you come prepared in advance for what you were going to talk about?

S: No, even now I still don’t prepare anything when it comes to the MC.

―― Most of us decide on what to say dependnig on the atmosphere in the venue. Is Sakurai-san that type of person?

S: That’s right. That’s why I end up talking about unnecessary things too (smiles).

―― Well, then I guess we still don’t know what you’re going to say on Monday, September.

S: …… Maybe nothing (smiles)?

―― Please say something (smiles). I do want to sigh and say, “When will be able to go back to the good old style of live concerts?”, but what does BUCK-TICK envision the future format of live performances to be?   I suppose you’re going to see how it goes with this attempt first.

I: That’s right. With regards to live streams, I guess the good thing about them comes through because of this present situation that we’re in. If this isn’t the case, I don’t think we’d do that.

―― BUCK-TICK is also very popular abroad, and it’s big that those fans who can’t really attend live shows usually are able to watch now, right?

I: That’s very true. Given that, I do wonder how it’d turn out since there are no capacity limits at all too. I also wonder about whether there will be more different ways to do this in future.

―― We’re in a situation where COVID-19 has not only affected live shows, but also questions the very existence of music and puts the arts and entertainment industry in jeopardy. Considering all of this, was there any part that made you re-examine your feelings towards music?

I: I feel that in this situation, the form with which we bring [our work] to our fans and music lovers is gradually changing and refreshing itself.

―― This was also a period when we keenly felt that even though we’re feeling down, music is definitely something that gives us a lot of support. In that sense, did your trust in music as a medium or personal feelings of, “That’s what we’re creating,” grow stronger?

I: I think it did grow stronger, and there were more opportunities for me to think especially about those things.

―― What about Sakurai-san?   As new methods to distribute music come about, was there any part of you that reconsidered the significance of the existence of music, or renewed your feelings about it?

S: I think everyone did have those thoughts, but I only imagine that things will get better. That’s why we take measures to step up towards that end, and so on. I think the most wholesome thing for us is really to interact with the audience at concerts with our music, though. Until we can return to that, we can only bear with it because COVID-19 infections are life-threatening. I hope to someday meet everyone again on a concert tour. Also, for me, music is something that has been saving me since I was a child. So, this isn’t part of our earlier conversation, but [music] was also a place where I can escape to. And that’s why I hope that each person’s method of listening and enjoying music remains the same. I’d be happy if that’s the kind of existence [that music] can have.

―― Looking back, at the time of 9.11, you you depicted your wish for a peaceful world with Kyokutou yori Ai wo Komete, and after the Great East Japan Earthquake, you released the album Yumemiru Uchuu to be close to those who have been hurt by the disaster. Considering the state of the world now, who are the people you’re hoping to support and help the most with this album?

S: Ah, no, that’s…… We’re not being presumptuous here thinking that we can do something about things from where we are. We have something that we’ve created ourselves here, and we just think that it’d be nice if various people happen to to feel that, “This really resonates with me now.” This is something that belongs to the listeners and if we happen to cross paths, then that’s good in itself too. Like, if they encounter our music and think, “How poignant,” and things like that…… I really think that’s enough. Because we can’t actually be close to them or anything like that, right? That’s why I think that as long as there are people who enjoy our music and like it, it’s enough.

―― Does Imai-san feel this way too?

I: I do. I mean, I don’t think about it that much, though.

―― Looking back on this album again, were there any discoveries you made following its completion?   Things that unintentionally turned out a certain way, and the sort.

I: Since we had to suspend activities, and had our recording progress in various ways we’ve never done before, there was a part of me that, although sure that we’d complete the album, also had no idea about what kind of album it would turn out to be. I think that conversely made it an album that I looked forward to.

―― What about Sakurai-san?

S: The stories I wrote, definitely…… Or rather, it’s most certainly not positive or forward-looking either. There isn’t even a message that says anything like, “Let’s cheer up”, though. How appropriate it would be to say, a negative multiplied by another negative makes a positive (smiles).

―― No, it’s definitely appropriate. It’s lovely.

S: My energy leans towards the negative, but when it is multiplied with those who feel a little down, we’d be like, “Oh, yeah! Let’s go!” Well, if only it’s like this (smiles). If only I could generate affirmative courage, even if just a little. Like what you said today, the way you called [the album] an omamori…… That’s a good one (smiles). It’ll make me happy if those people can listen to this album like an omamori.

―― Aside from “Make everything disappear!”, the chant “Abracadabra” appears to have a variety of different interpretations, even one that says it dispels plagues. Don’t you feel that this can be taken in many different ways?

S: That’s right. You could say that for me, I simply mean to say, “This is just a verbal spell, but this is all I can do. My apologies.” Like, if many different people cast many different spells, that should do something, right? (Smiles).

―― But words are important, aren’t they? I feel that words and music have a soul. We’re still not sure about how the annual year-end live concert will turn out, but when I hear Sakurai-san’s “Have a happy new year” and Imai-san’s guitar phrase when he leaves the stage, I feel like I’ve received a lovely gift (smiles).

S/I: (Smiles).

―― Lastly, regarding this album’s artwork, what were the keywords that the band shared with Akita-san?

I: No, well, we had a meeting with designer Akita-san, and he told us the idea with which he wanted to proceed. At the time, we had a few different ideas floating around, but among all of that, we felt that this one’s good.

―― It’s a very bright jacket, which is an oddity among your works which have been mostly dark, isn’t it?

I: That’s also something I mentioned to Akita-san in the beginning. I thought it’d be nice if we had a rainbow in there.

―― It’s beautiful and it feels fresh. How does Sakurai-san feel about this?

S: I think that it’s a good thing that it isn’t dark. For this time (smiles).

―― Why do you think so?

S: Like the lyrics that Imai-san wrote, it is “hopeful”, and it’s also related to my lyric of “like a rainbow” in Boukyaku. In this way, I can convey the things that I’m embarrassed about through Akita-san’s art work.

―― What a wonderful collaborative effort.

S: It sure is. It’s because I already trust him.

―― Well then, we’ll first look forward to the album’s release and the no-audience, live online broadcast concert on Monday, September 21. Thank you!

S/I: Thank you.

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

* Do note that any lyric translations featured here are subject to change.

¹ Omamori (御守 or お守り) are Japanese amulets commonly sold at Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples, dedicated to particular Shinto kami as well as Buddhist figures, and are said to provide various forms of luck or protection.

² I believe the interviewer was referring to Kemonotachi no Yoru/RONDO.

³ The word used here was 沈んで (shizunde), used to refer to something sinking.

⁴ The phrase used here is 鬼の首を取った (oni no kubi wo totta), literally, to have chopped a demon’s head off. It’s a saying that typically refers to a person boasting, or being overly prideful or triumphant over inconsequential things.

⁵ A line from Que Sera Sera Elegy: 幻想の始まりだ (gensou no hajimari da).

⁶ A line from Eureka: 全て消えて失せろ (subete kiete usero).

⁷ “Returning to the earth” as in the cycle of life and how people all decompose and effectively return to the earth. “Returning to the womb” as in 胎内回帰 (tainai kaiki) the unbirthing thing.

⁸ A line from Tsuki no Sabaku: 骨になるまで 灰になるまで (hone ni naru made   hai ni naru made).

⁹ A lie from Maimu Mime: 死んでみるか (shinde miru ka).
n
¹⁰ Mishima Yukio was a Japanese author, poet, playwright, actor, model, film director, nationalist, and founder of the Tatenokai. Mishima is considered one of the most important Japanese authors of the 20th century.
Confessions of a Mask is his second novel. First published in 1949, it launched him to national fame even though he was only in his early twenties.

¹¹ A line from Dance Tengoku: 女でも 男でも どっちでもいいのさ (onna de mo   otoko de mo   docchi demo ii no sa).

¹² Kazunori Akita or Kazvnori Akita have worked on BUCK-TICK’s album and single covers for a long time now. You can see all his works here: https://www.instagram.com/kazvnoriakita/

¹³ The actual phrase was 大人の事情 (otona no jijou), which is an excuse for not explaining something (lol). It can be translated as “adult matters”, “grown-up business”, or basically, “none of your business”.

¹⁴ Meaning to imply, not an ordinary day.

 

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Source: https://www.barks.jp/news/?id=1000189126

The “Plague Repelling Spell” BUCK-TICK Speaks Of

BARKS.jp
18 September 2020

 

The latest issue of the “rock magazine to read”, ROCK AND READ #091 will hit the shelves on September 19. This issue’s front features Sakurai Atsushi and Imai Hisashi of BUCK-TICK who will be releasing their 22nd album, ABRACADABRA on the 33rd anniversary of their major debut, September 21.

Also joining Sakurai Atsushi and Imai Hisashi within the pages are Hoshino Hidehiko, Higuchi Yutaka, and Yagami Toll. All 5 members of the band will talk about the album ABRACADABRA and each track on it individually.

ABRACADABRA, their first original album to be released in 2 and a half years was finally completed after a brief pause in recording activities because of COVID-19, but at the same time, it has turned out to be an album which was aptly born out of such a production situation. Furthermore, the interviews are said to give a fulfilling glimpse to the behind-the-scenes of the album’s production with content like the messages which Sakurai conveys through his lyrics and why the album has been given the title of a plague repelling spell of Abracadabra.

In addition, the magazine includes an article which discusses the “Buck-Tick Phenomenon (Bakuchiku Genshou)” that occurred 33 years ago in 1987. It will re-examine all of this while looking back on the intent behind the stickers which were pasted everywhere to announce their 1 April 1987 concert at Toshima Public Hall, the significance of their major debut with their 21 September 1987 Buck-Tick Phenomenon at THE LIVE INN (Bakuchiku Genshou at THE LIVE INN) concert video, their Tokyo Dome performance in 1989, and their documentary movie Gekijouban BUCK-TICK ~Bakuchiku Genshou~ (The Buck-Tick Syndrome I).

 

■『ROCK AND READ 091』, releasing Saturday, 19 Sep 2020 

■ Related links
ROCK AND READ Official Twitter

 

 

 

 

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Source: https://www.barks.jp/news/?id=1000189036

“Kogoeru” to be Ending Theme of Yamishibai (Iki)

Natalie.mu
14 August 2020

 

It has been announced that BUCK-TICK’s new song, “Kogoeru”, will be the ending theme song of the TV Tokyo late-night drama Yamishibai (Iki) [Shadow Picture Show – Live] premiering on Wednesday, 9 September.

Adapted from the popular horror anime Yamishibai directed by Iguchi Noboru, Yamishibai (Iki) is a live-action drama produced by TV Tokyo and Dear Stage. The ending theme song “Kogoeru” is a striking new song with lyrics written by Sakurai Atsushi (vocals) and music composed by Hoshino Hidehiko (guitar), with chilling lines that serve to highlight the sense of dread present in the drama. This is one song where BUCK-TICK’s style of pop-sense and dark world view shine.

Sakurai shared a few comments in response to the band’s involvement with the provision of the ending theme song. With regards to the song itself, he explained, “This song is about a sorrowful soul who wanders between that world and this, and from this world to the next.”

“What a blessing it is that (this song) is to be the lullaby which draws everyone to the edge of darkness in the aftermath of Yamishibai. I will be waiting for you on Wednesday in September, before the dead of night at Yamishibai (Iki). Do your best to make sure you don’t forget.”

Comment from Sakurai Atsushi (BUCK-TICK)
It is a great honour that this time, BUCK-TICK’s Kogoeru
has been chosen to be the ending theme song for Yamishibai (Iki).
I hope that we can contribute some deadly flowers to the world of television drama, even if just a few.
This song is about a sorrowful soul who wanders between that world and this, and from this world to the next.
What a blessing it is that (this song) is to be the lullaby which draws¹ everyone to the edge of darkness in the aftermath of Yamishibai.
I will be waiting for you on a Wednesday in September², before the dead of night² at Yamishibai (Iki).
Do your best³ to make sure you don’t forget.”

 


Premiering: Wednesday, 9 September 2020 at 25:28~25:58*
(※25:28~25:58 on every Wednesday thereafter)

 

 

 

 

Notes:

¹ Instead of using the modern-day reading of 誘う, さそう (sasou), Sakurai has seemingly deliberately chosen to use いざなう (izanau), an archaic and more uncommon reading of it which is more exclusive to poetry or literary works these days. A notable instance where Sakurai chose to use the “izanau” reading that I can remember off the top of my head is in Ai no Souretsu (lyrics).

² Here, Sakurai used 長月 (nagatsuki) rather than the usual 九月 (kugatsu). Nagatsuki the name that was used for September in the old Japanese which was adapted from the Chinese lunar calendar. Nagatsuki literally means “the long month).
On the other hand, Sakurai used 丑三 (ushimitsu) to state the approximate time of the show’s broadcast. Under Japan’s ancient time-telling system, Ushimitsu is the period between 2:00 AM and 2:30 AM. Certain hours of the day such as Ushimitsu-doki (the dead of night) and Omaga-doki (twilight hour) were thought to serve as boundaries to the sacred area. Omega-doki is probably around 6 PM, dusk.

³ Sakurai used 努努 which reads “yume yume”. I’d bet my coin it’s a wordplay which, once again, revolves around 夢 (yume) – dream. Because, of course it is.

* Yet another interesting thing about Japan is that they denote hours past 24, as seen above (25:28). Basically it’s to state that a particular show starts after midnight or a place’s business hours extend beyond midnight. So in this case, 25:28 will be 1:28 AM. Just subtract 24 from the hour.

 

Translation: Yoshiyuki
Source: https://natalie.mu/music/news/392069